sexual orientation – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ Tue, 29 Mar 2022 04:40:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cflweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png sexual orientation – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ 32 32 In Georgia, a Republican bill attacks trans youth and obscures US history in classrooms https://cflweb.org/in-georgia-a-republican-bill-attacks-trans-youth-and-obscures-us-history-in-classrooms/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 01:54:05 +0000 https://cflweb.org/in-georgia-a-republican-bill-attacks-trans-youth-and-obscures-us-history-in-classrooms/ On February 11, the Georgian Senate passed and approved new legislation intended to clamp down on discussions of gender identity and critical race theory in K-8 private schools. The bill passed 32 to 20 along party lines. Summarized in a single bill, it is the latest in a nationwide series of GOP attacks on teachers […]]]>

On February 11, the Georgian Senate passed and approved new legislation intended to clamp down on discussions of gender identity and critical race theory in K-8 private schools. The bill passed 32 to 20 along party lines. Summarized in a single bill, it is the latest in a nationwide series of GOP attacks on teachers who teach students about gender and racial inequality in schools.

Although Senate Bill 613 (inappropriately titled “Common Humanity in Private Education Act”) does not affect public schools the way it is currently drafted, other bills are in circulation that would affect public education, such as HB 1084 and SB 377. Private Schools In Georgia, it also already lacks a significant number of discrimination protections that public schools have; SB 613 would serve to intensify this problem.

Forcing an ahistorical narrative of slavery

The bill is drafted in terms aimed at ensuring that private schools “treat students of all racial and ethnic backgrounds equally and individually” to frame the new regulations as protection against racism, implicitly “racism” towards whites. But this verbiage disguises the true nature of the legislation. Towards the end, the bill explicitly prohibits private schools from teaching:

“That the advent of slavery in the territory that is now the United States constituted

the true foundation of the United States; Where

That in terms of their relationship to American values, slavery and racism are anything other than deviations, betrayals, or breaches of the genuine founding principles of the United States, which include freedom and equality…”

In fact, slavery could not be more fundamental to the founding of the United States and the development of capitalism on the continent. Many Founding Fathers owned slaves, and the principles of “freedom and equality” were meant to apply only to whites, especially white men. The social and political rights that black people in the United States enjoy today – like the right to vote – only exist because of militant struggle. These freedoms exist not because of the founding principles of the United States, but despite them.

By loosely referring to “critical theory” of race as a regressive force without providing a definition, the bill exposes private school teachers to repression if they portray America’s heritage as having been everything. except benevolent towards black people and indigenous people.

This legislation is part of a coordinated nationwide attack and response against the anti-racism movement that has put 35 million people on the streets following the murder of George Floyd in the summer of 2020.

“Don’t Say Gay”

SB613 also prohibits classroom discussion of gender identity, saying it leads to discrimination based on a “hierarchy of oppressors and oppressed” and is “destructive to the fabric of American society.” This language is borrowed from similar bills proposed by the GOP across the country, such as Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” bill.

The claim is that school children are not “of the age of discretion” for discussions about sexual orientation and gender, and that such discussions will lead to confusion. The underlying assumption is that all children are cisgender and heterosexual until they reach an “appropriate age” to learn more.

Rather than preventing confusion in children, these drastic measures will only make it worse. When children don’t receive a comprehensive education about gender and sexual orientation, it doesn’t make them any less gay or trans. Instead, they grow up not knowing why they don’t “fit in” with most of their peers. ‘

Trans children who go through puberty of their assigned sex suffer from depression and anxiety at significantly higher levels than their cisgender counterparts, leading to a higher likelihood of suicide attempts. If they are not taught in the first place that being transgender is a possibility, they will not know the source of their anguish and that there are answers and solutions.

Blocking all teaching about sexual orientation and gender identity does not remove the “hierarchy”, but makes things worse for gay and trans youth. They are more likely to be stereotyped as outcasts by their classmates and to experience discrimination.

The working class will not be divided

This backlash against anti-racism and the LGBT rights movement aims to divide working people against each other, but Georgian teachers are not backing down without a fight.

“After the 2020 uprising, many systemic racial issues were exposed in America,” said Jermaine Stubbs, a teacher and organizer in Atlanta. “The fear of the dismantling of the system is frightening [the lawmakers]. Children learning the true history of America would not only benefit them, but it could lead to a real dismantling of that history. [capitalist] system.”

Local educator groups are already organizing to fight classroom restrictions, such as United Campus Workers of Georgia, Gwinnett Educators for Equity and Justice, and more.

The Democratic Party’s failure to fight and end these reactionary bans reveals a critical lesson: only a broad independent movement of workers and students can defend against these vicious right-wing attacks and secure our most basic rights. . History has proven that when we fight, we can win!

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Florida’s ‘Don’t Say Gay’ Bill Could Jeopardize Education Money https://cflweb.org/floridas-dont-say-gay-bill-could-jeopardize-education-money/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 13:51:37 +0000 https://cflweb.org/floridas-dont-say-gay-bill-could-jeopardize-education-money/ On March 8, the Florida Legislature voted to pass the Parental Rights in Education Bill – colloquially known as the “Don’t Say Gay” Bill (HB 1557) – which prohibits schools in the state from discussing sexual orientation or gender identity with students. third year and limits topics to only “age appropriate” discussions – which are […]]]>

On March 8, the Florida Legislature voted to pass the Parental Rights in Education Bill – colloquially known as the “Don’t Say Gay” Bill (HB 1557) – which prohibits schools in the state from discussing sexual orientation or gender identity with students. third year and limits topics to only “age appropriate” discussions – which are not defined – after this point. Students, parents and lawmakers have denounced the bill as blatantly homophobic and transphobic, ostracizing LGBTQ+ students and spawning a culture of intolerance in schools. But by passing this law, Florida is also putting its schools between a rock and a hard place: Schools may now have to decide whether to violate federal law by conforming to state law. Either way, students will suffer the consequences.

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Federal Civil Rights Act prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded educational programs, provides that “no one” shall, “on the basis of gender, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be discriminated against in an education program or activity. united in Bostock v. County of Clayton– in which the court found that Title VII, a civil rights law prohibiting sex discrimination in employment, also prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity – the Department of Education (ED) issued an Interpretation Notice on June 16, 2021, clarifying that Title IX “also prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity,” and ED will enforce this prohibition. Interpretation boards are telling schools nationwide that anti-LGBTQ+ discrimination will not be tolerated.

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With anti-trans law gone, Guyana’s trans community seeks to reform society – Erasing 76 Crimes https://cflweb.org/with-anti-trans-law-gone-guyanas-trans-community-seeks-to-reform-society-erasing-76-crimes/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 15:29:32 +0000 https://cflweb.org/with-anti-trans-law-gone-guyanas-trans-community-seeks-to-reform-society-erasing-76-crimes/ Now that Guyana’s old anti-trans law has been repealed, Guyana’s transgender community is tackling the task of eliminating anti-trans attitudes from society. Healthcare workers during the Guyana Trans United briefing on February 25, 2022 in Georgetown, Guyana. (Photo courtesy of GTU) Guyanese transgender woman Marcia John (pseudonym) prepared to leave a transgender support group meeting. […]]]>

Now that Guyana’s old anti-trans law has been repealed, Guyana’s transgender community is tackling the task of eliminating anti-trans attitudes from society.

Healthcare workers during the Guyana Trans United briefing on February 25, 2022 in Georgetown, Guyana. (Photo courtesy of GTU)

Guyanese transgender woman Marcia John (pseudonym) prepared to leave a transgender support group meeting. She took off her black wig and replaced it with a bandana and a hat. Her employer only allows her to perform her duties if she presents herself as a man.

“I have no choice,” she said. “I have to work.”

In 2018, the Caribbean Court of Justice ruled that an 1893 Guyanese law banning cross-dressing was unconstitutional. Last August, lawmakers officially removed this section from the law books. But for Ms John and other transgender women, it hasn’t been enough to transform the way they navigate social spaces. Intolerant attitudes persist, with sometimes disastrous consequences for the well-being and livelihoods of transgender people.

Led by the University of the West Indies Advocacy Project, the cross-dressing law challenge began with a constitutional action filed in the High Court of Guyana in 2010. Eight years and two appeals later, litigants have won a historic victory.

GTU leadership during a media training in Georgetown, Guyana in 2018. (Photo by Cedriann Martin courtesy of UNAIDS)

“At the heart of the right to equality and non-discrimination is the recognition that a fundamental objective of any constitutional democracy is to develop a society in which all citizens are respected and considered equal”, ruled the last Caribbean Court of Appeals in 2018.

Reflecting on the impact of the landmark law reform effort, Guyana Trans United (GTU) project coordinator Alessandra Hereman said the main benefit has been greater visibility.

“The increased media presence of the community during the build-up to the case brought transgender issues into the public space. People have realized that transgender Guyanese exist and are part of our society. Some thought we should be treated equally and others clung to their religious beliefs. But transgender issues were brought to the fore and became part of the public discourse, she said from the GTU’s Georgetown office.

Formed in 2012, GTU has worked over the past decade to facilitate the dialogue and awareness that is needed alongside major legislative and policy reforms to create a safe and empowering social context for transgender people. They contribute to the ongoing effort to change the attitudes and perceptions of healthcare providers regarding sexual orientation and gender identity. This work strengthens community access to health services, including HIV prevention, testing and treatment. With support from UNAIDS, GTU has also trained journalists in ethical and accurate coverage of transgender people and their issues.

<strong>Alessandra Hereman, Guyana Trans United Project Coordinator.  (Photo courtesy of Stabroek News)</strong>” width=”394″ height=”394″ data-lazy-srcset=”https://76crimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Alessandra-Hereman.jpg 394w, https://76crimes.com /wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Alessandra-Hereman-300×300.jpg 300w, https://76crimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Alessandra-Hereman-290×290.jpg 290w, https:/ /76crimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Alessandra-Hereman-192×192.jpg 192w, https://76crimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Alessandra-Hereman-384×384.jpg 384w , https://76crimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Alessandra-Hereman-110×110.jpg 110w, https://76crimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Alessandra-Hereman- 220×220.jpg 220w, https://76crimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Alessandra-Hereman-364×364.jpg 364w, https://76crimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/ Alessandra-Hereman-48×48.jpg 48w, https://76crimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Alessandra-Hereman-96×96.jpg 96w” data-lazy-sizes=”(max-width: 394px) 100vw, 394px” data-lazy-src=”https://76crimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/Alessa  ndra-Hereman.jpg?is-pending-load=1″ srcset=”data:image/gif;base64,R0lGODlhAQABAIAAAAAAAP///yH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAAIBRAA7″/><noscript><img loading=Alessandra Hereman, Guyana Trans United Project Coordinator. (Photo courtesy of Stabroek News)

“Legislative reform is essential, but it is not a stand-alone solution,” said James Guwani, Director of the UNAIDS Subregional Office for the Caribbean. “Alongside strategies such as judicial oversight and political advocacy, there must be community dialogue and targeted efforts to increase social inclusion.

Currently, the GTU has two main law and policy reform priorities. First, Guyana’s Prevention of Discrimination Act 1997 makes no mention of sexual orientation or gender identity.

“Employers are using the lack of this protected status to discriminate against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people. Changing this legislation would mean that if you violate the rights of an LGBT person, there would be a redress mechanism. Having that in place will tell people that you can’t discriminate because there will be consequences,” Ms Hereman explained.

The CARICOM Secretariat, through the Pan-Caribbean Partnership Against HIV and AIDS (PANCAP), has developed a Model Anti-Discrimination Law to guide Caribbean countries in creating anti-discrimination laws. PANCAP continues to advocate with regional stakeholders, including policymakers, for countries to adopt the model as it provides for the protection of people against discrimination, including discrimination involving harassment, victimization and defamation due to HIV status, sexual orientation, etc. hopes the model will lead to improved access to healthcare for key populations with the overarching goal of a Caribbean free of AIDS and new HIV infections, in which all people are happier, healthier, productive , safe and respected. Next on GTU’s list is revising the teachers’ code of conduct to include the needs of LGBT students.

“They need to know that they have a duty to create an enabling environment for all students so that LGBT students have the opportunity to learn without bullying,” Ms Hereman said.

The absence of gender recognition legislation and the criminalization of same-sex sexual relations remain challenges in the context of Guyana and the wider Caribbean. The United Caribbean Trans Network has launched a campaign around gender identity recognition, while the Society against Sexual Orientation Discrimination is working to remove Sections 351-353 of the Criminal Law (Offences) Act, which make sexual relations between men punishable by life imprisonment. However, the GTU prioritizes issues that it believes are central to transgender people’s ability to obtain an education and access employment. Exclusion from these spaces increases their vulnerability to poverty, violence and disease.

“We occupy the lowest socio-economic level of society. Guyana is now an oil producing nation. LGBT people should also have opportunities,” Ms Hereman insisted.

Thanks to Alturi for finding this UNAIDS article.

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HRC launches ‘Reality Flag’ campaign to strengthen equality law https://cflweb.org/hrc-launches-reality-flag-campaign-to-strengthen-equality-law/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 15:04:25 +0000 https://cflweb.org/hrc-launches-reality-flag-campaign-to-strengthen-equality-law/ The Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest LGBTQ civil rights organization, announced the launch of a nationwide multimedia campaign to promote congressional approval of LGBTQ non-discrimination legislation known as the equality law. In a Feb. 23 statement, HRC says the campaign will include, among other things, a series of “powerful” social media and TV video […]]]>

The Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest LGBTQ civil rights organization, announced the launch of a nationwide multimedia campaign to promote congressional approval of LGBTQ non-discrimination legislation known as the equality law.

In a Feb. 23 statement, HRC says the campaign will include, among other things, a series of “powerful” social media and TV video ads created by Emmy Award-winning director Joey Soloway, which tell how the LGBTQ people are affected. by discrimination.

At the center of the campaign, as the videos show, is an American flag with 29 of the 50 stars removed to draw attention to the 29 states that lack comprehensive legal protections for LGBTQ people, which the HRC calls the “flag of reality”.

During its official campaign launch on Feb. 23, HRC unveiled an 85-foot-long version of the Reality Flag on the exterior wall of its DC headquarters, which HRC says is located just six blocks from the White House.

“The Reality Flag campaign is designed to highlight the inequalities that LGBTQ+ people face every day – in our own voice, said Joni Madison, Acting Chair of HRC. “From discrimination in housing and education to denial of government and health services, LGBTQ+ people face barriers to simply existing every day,” Madison said in a statement.

“That has to change,” she said. “The Reality Flag not only calls out to the 29 states where basic freedoms are still lacking for millions of people, but represents a symbol of hope that communities can rally together to implement meaningful change.”

The HRC’s Reality Flag campaign comes at a time when most political observers unaffiliated with staunch supporters and opponents of the Equality Act believe the bill has no chance of passing the US Senate anytime soon. , even though it passed the United States House in February 2021 by a vote of 224 to 206. In the House vote, only three Republicans joined the 221 Democrats in voting for the measure.

Observers note that although Democrats have a slim Republican Senate majority of 50 Democrats-50 with Vice President Kamala Harris poised to break a tie vote in favor of Democrats, the longstanding Senate filibuster rule that Democrats can’t change means the Equality Act needs a 60-vote majority to pass.

Forty-nine of 50 Senate Democrats have signed on as co-sponsors of the Equality Act. Maverick Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia has become the only Senate Democrat to say he cannot support the Equality Act as it currently stands due, in part, to what Manchin says is its provisions for transgender non-discrimination in school sports and the use of school toilets.

Sources familiar with the Senate told the Washington Blade last May that even if the filibuster rule were eliminated, other Democratic senators from swing states would likely join Manchin in refusing to support the equality law. due to efforts by some Republicans to turn transgender rights into an inflammatory corner issue.

The official Congress website Congress.gov states that the Equality Act calls for prohibiting “discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation and gender identity in areas such as public housing and facilities, ‘education, federal funding, employment, housing, credit and the jury system’. .”

The Congress.gov site adds, “The bill prohibits an individual from being denied access to a shared facility, including restrooms, locker rooms, and locker rooms, that is consistent with the gender identity of the individual. ‘individual.”

Several moderate GOP senators, including Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), have said they support the principle of freedom from discrimination for LGBTQ people and would be willing to vote for a revised equality law that includes this which they call religious rights protections and some changes to transgender provisions.

Some Republican watchers have said enough Republicans would likely join Democrats to reach the 60 votes needed to pass the Senate Equality Act if Democrats accept the changes proposed by moderate Republicans.

However, other Republicans, including the national LGBTQ GOP group Log Cabin Republicans, have said the equality law should be scrapped altogether following the landmark 2020 U.S. Supreme Court ruling known as the name of Bostock c. Clayton County. The ruling states that Title VII of the US Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits sex discrimination, also prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

Proponents of the Equality Act have argued that legislation is still needed to ensure LGBTQ people are fully protected from discrimination in other areas such as housing and public accommodations.

Representatives from both sides have said negotiations have been underway over possible changes to the Equality Act since at least the start of last year, but nothing has emerged from those negotiations reported this week.

Many LGBTQ advocacy organizations, including the HRC, said the GOP had suggested changes to the Equality Act related to “religious freedom,” which supporters of the bill say means a right to discriminate against LGBTQ people on religious grounds in a non-religious setting such as a private business open to the public, is unacceptable.

Most LGBTQ advocacy groups have also declared unacceptable GOP proposals to weaken or remove protections for transgender people in legislation, saying these proposals are being promoted by people who have been misled or are misleading themselves. even mislead others to believe cisgender women in sports and in public restrooms. as well as in school bathrooms and showers would be adversely affected by the current version of the legislation.

With both sides in what most Capitol Hill watchers consider a complete stalemate, Senate Democrats, including Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (DN.Y.), have not indicated their will to put the Equality Act to a vote in the Senate this year.

Schumer’s office did not respond to a Blade inquiry last week asking if Schumer would consider bringing the Equality Act to the Senate for a vote this year or next year if Democrats retain control of the Senate during midterm elections of 2022.

With that as a backdrop, David Stacy, HRC’s Director of Government Affairs, told The Blade in a February 25 statement that passing the Equality Act remains a high priority for HRC and the LGBTQ+ community. .

“Passing legislation through the US Senate is not easy,” Stacy said. “In the meantime, support continues to grow for the bill, and we believe the Reality Flag campaign will continue to generate the awareness and education needed to continue to build support and pressure for action,” a- he declared.

“Since our launch, we’ve already seen people say they had no idea LGBTQ+ people didn’t already have these protections, and that’s what we aim to do here: educate people and inspire them. to take action at the grassroots level across the country – call their senators and make it clear to them that it’s time we need to do that,” Stacy said. “Some people may be ready to give up. We’re not. “, did he declare.

In its three-page statement announcing the launch of its Reality Flag campaign, HRC says the campaign is produced in partnership with a team of advertising and public relations agencies affiliated with international marketing and communications giant WPP.
“While the campaign aims to galvanize public support for the Equality Act and inspire public action on RealityFlag.com, it also highlights the importance of raising and showcasing the real stories and lived experiences of LGBTQ+ people affected by discrimination,” the statement continued.

It says stories about individual LGTQ people will primarily be featured in “video vignettes” created by television writer and director Joey Soloway, the Emmy Award-winning creator of “Transparent,” an original television comedy-drama series from ‘Amazon Studios on a Transgender. wife and her family. Soloway identifies as non-binary and gender non-conforming.

“These stories…will be amplified through both an advertising campaign, including partnerships with 20 national media platforms, achieving over 30 million impressions expected at launch, including TV, print, billboard, video, audio, film, OOH, social media and search,” the HRC statement read.

Access to some of the video ads planned for the HRC Reality Flag campaign is available at RealityFlag.com.

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What the equal pay case in American football means for the sport https://cflweb.org/what-the-equal-pay-case-in-american-football-means-for-the-sport/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 00:17:31 +0000 https://cflweb.org/what-the-equal-pay-case-in-american-football-means-for-the-sport/ In a case that has implications for the sports world, the US Women Soccer Players Association recently won a settlement for discrimination and unequal pay. There is still a long way to go before equal pay in sport, a sector in which the pay gap between men and women is widening year by year. Research […]]]>
  • In a case that has implications for the sports world, the US Women Soccer Players Association recently won a settlement for discrimination and unequal pay.
  • There is still a long way to go before equal pay in sport, a sector in which the pay gap between men and women is widening year by year.
  • Research for the World Economic Forum shows that diversity and inclusion in sport increases its societal value.

After six years of legal action, the US Women Soccer Players Association recently won a settlement over discrimination and unequal pay. American football’s governing body agreed to pay $24 million and pledged to match salaries and bonuses to match the men’s team. The Association congratulated not only the lawyers but also the athletes themselves “for their historic success in the fight against decades of discrimination”. This is a big step towards equal pay for women in sport.

But there’s still a long way to go before the sports industry closes the gender pay gap. While the general gender pay gap has remained relatively constant over the past two decades, the sports pay gap has grown year over year. The difference in earnings between the highest paid male and female athletes in major sports such as football, basketball, tennis, golf or baseball can be staggering. For example, Golden State Warriors player Stephen Curry was on track to earn over $40 million in salary during the 2019-20 season. That same year, DeWanna Bonner, the WNBA’s highest-paid player, was entitled to a base salary of $127,500.

Statistics tend to show that there is less market and public interest in women’s sports competitions, leading to speculation that they generate less money. However, Dr Laura Claus from the UCL School of Management argued that “the market follows with the money athletes are paid. More salary for athletes makes them more attractive to the public, as evidenced by professional footballers. So you could say we have to pay women more first and then the market will even out.

Research for the World Economic Forum’s Power of Media initiative, published in a report due to launch in March 2022, shows that diversity and inclusion in sport brings increased societal value. The report will measure how well consumers see themselves represented in film and television, games, news and magazines, and sports, and whether these industries contribute to community and society.

Over the past five years, there have been more initiatives to support female athletes. Visa signed a groundbreaking agreement with the US Soccer Association in 2019 that allocated over 50% of funds to the women’s team. This created media coverage and discussion about investing in women’s sport. Such initiatives are important for creating debate and raising questions about equality issues. They also allow athletes to use their positions to seek greater equality.

While the general gender pay gap has remained relatively constant over the past two decades, the sports pay gap has grown year over year.

While the general gender pay gap has remained relatively constant over the past two decades, the sports pay gap has grown year over year.

Image: Adelphi University, New York

Over the past year, several sports organizations have contributed to investments that will have a positive impact on women’s sport. The Women’s National Basketball Association (NBA) declared a capital increase of $75 million through the sale of shares in the league. The Premier Hockey Federation has committed to investing $25 million in the women’s hockey league over the next few years to improve its overall positioning, competition and fan experience, with a focus on player salaries . The US Golf Association will increase the prize money for the Women’s Open to $10 million this year and $12 million over the next 5 years, nearly double the previous amount.

The COVID-19 pandemic and recent social and political unrest have created a deep sense of urgency for businesses to actively work to address inequality.

The Forum’s work on diversity, equality, inclusion and social justice is led by the New Economy and Society Platform, which focuses on building prosperous, inclusive and just economies and societies. In addition to its work on economic growth, recovery and transformation, labour, wages and job creation, and education, skills and learning, the Platform takes an integrated and holistic approach to diversity, equity, inclusion and social justice, and aims to combat exclusion, prejudice and discrimination based on race, gender, ability, sexual orientation and all other forms of human diversity.

The platform produces data, standards and information, such as the Global Gender Gap Report and the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion 4.0 Toolkit, and pilots or supports action initiatives, such as Partnering for Racial Justice in Business, The Valuable 500 – Closing the Disability Inclusion Gap, Hardwiring Gender Parity in the Future of Work, Closing the Gender Gap Country Accelerators, the Partnership for Global LGBTI Equality, the Community of Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officers and the Global Future Council on Equity and Social Justice.

The rules of American football have huge implications not just for football but for sports in general. Other sports will have to step up their efforts to achieve equality. As US Women’s Soccer Captain Megan Rapinoe said, “For us, this is just a huge win in making sure we not only right the wrongs of the past, but also prepare the next generation for something.” we dreamed of. We are truly in the midst of an incredible turning point in women’s sport.”

It is time for sports organizations, sponsors, leagues and international governing bodies to work together and achieve the goal of an equal, diverse and inclusive environment.

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EHRC is here to support the rights of all – no matter who says otherwise | Kishwer Falkner https://cflweb.org/ehrc-is-here-to-support-the-rights-of-all-no-matter-who-says-otherwise-kishwer-falkner/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/ehrc-is-here-to-support-the-rights-of-all-no-matter-who-says-otherwise-kishwer-falkner/ I15 years have passed since the establishment of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, the independent body charged with protecting and promoting equality and human rights for all in Britain. We regulate and enforce human rights and equality laws and advance rights through carefully considered recommendations for reform. Although we have made significant progress over […]]]>

I15 years have passed since the establishment of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, the independent body charged with protecting and promoting equality and human rights for all in Britain. We regulate and enforce human rights and equality laws and advance rights through carefully considered recommendations for reform. Although we have made significant progress over the past 15 years, there will always be more to do.

We have many and varied stakeholders – skilled and effective advocates who encourage and challenge us to address the equality and human rights issues that matter to them. Our relationships with civic organizations, activists and those they represent are vitally important in informing our thinking and priorities. But with our broad mandate and so many people and groups advocating for so many issues, it’s inevitable that we can’t please them all all the time.

My position and integrity as chair of the EHRC has come under particular criticism from some stakeholders, who perceive that the commission has undergone a shift in its approach. I can’t speak to how the previous president ran things, but I can say that what matters to me, to the board and to our new CEO is that we are committed to maintain our independence, impartiality, evidence-based decision-making, and to resist undue influence from any quarter.

This has put us at odds with some of our stakeholders recently, but that’s nothing new. The EHRC has often been criticized over the years and it is not a comfortable place to be – for our Commissioners, for our committed staff or for stakeholders who disagree with us. But it is an inevitable part of our role in regulating a legal framework that recognizes nine protected characteristics, often with competing rights and needs.

We have a legal obligation to consider equality and human rights for all and this includes how the rights of one person or group may be affected by the rights of another. We do not allow our decisions and actions to be influenced by the loudest voices in any particular debate. We are accountable to Parliament and held to high standards in fulfilling our mandate.

The legal basis for our governance, including the process for appointing the Chair and Commissioners, is enshrined in our founding law and has not changed since the EHRC was established. This applied to my appointment as to those of my predecessors under previous Labour, Coalition and Conservative governments.

The latest pressure comes from polarized debates over the rights of transgender people, who face hate crimes and barriers to changing their legal sex, such as excessively long wait times for gender identity clinics. . This is wrong and we have been lobbying the government to do something about it. We have also defended the rights of transgender people in the workplace, in recent legal interventions with employers.

Where we have changed our position on trans self-identification or gender recognition law, we have done so because new evidence of the tension between trans and women‘s rights is emerging. Just last week, there were seemingly conflicting legal judgments about what “sex” means in law. Other files are in preparation. Recently, public responses to our strategic plan have shown a huge increase in concern about these competing rights.

Last month I wrote to the Scottish Government advising it needed further consideration of specific aspects of the proposals, to address issues raised around data collection, gender-segregated service provision and new case law. I said absolutely nothing to suggest any hesitation in our commitment to trans rights.

We have also been accused of obstructing the ban on “conversion therapy”. Not true. Conversion therapy is harmful and the EHRC supports its end for both sexual orientation and being transgender. We have advised the UK Government that a lack of legal definitions of terms such as ‘being trans’ risks ambiguity over what will be covered by the ban and what will not.

We have recommended that Parliament carry out a thorough review of the legislation to ensure not only that harmful practices are prevented, but also that transgender people can receive the advice and support they need.

Debate on contested issues is necessary and I admire all those who defend rights and causes, fight discrimination and seek equality and justice. They help our country shape a fairer future. And U.S. too.

So I ask those – and this is a minority – who seek to undermine the EHRC: what do they hope to achieve and who do they think will protect and advance equality and human rights in our country? if they wish?

Baroness Falkner is Chair of the Equality and Human Rights Commission

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Supporting working women and families https://cflweb.org/supporting-working-women-and-families/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 23:07:37 +0000 https://cflweb.org/supporting-working-women-and-families/ Minnesota Catholic Conference staff are monitoring a flurry of bills, including paid family leave and a constitutional amendment that would give judges the power to create new patterns of discrimination based on the ambiguous concept of gender. Rebellion against the sexes We talk a lot today about “identity politics”. The urgent question is what identity […]]]>

Minnesota Catholic Conference staff are monitoring a flurry of bills, including paid family leave and a constitutional amendment that would give judges the power to create new patterns of discrimination based on the ambiguous concept of gender.

Rebellion against the sexes

We talk a lot today about “identity politics”. The urgent question is what identity should guide our policy. The Church proposes that our primary identity is as children of God created in his image – and created male and female. We are all brothers and sisters, and we should treat each other accordingly, living together in right relationship; that is, in justice and truth.

Others propose that we define ourselves primarily by racial identity or a fluid construction of ‘gender’. The latter creates an internal war against human nature by manipulating, instead of receiving, the divine gift of creation. It undermines the ability to form and participate in the natural family, thereby creating a society of atomized individuals beholden to the state.

These principles were central to MCC’s testimony against a proposed constitutional amendment to mandate gender equality. This so-called Equal Rights Amendment (HF 726) states: “Equality before the law shall not be restricted or denied on the basis of sex.”

With Promoters, we share the goal of ending unjust discrimination against all people. But making reasonable distinctions based on gender is often appropriate. In addition, the state’s human rights law already prohibits discrimination based on gender (including sexual orientation).

The proposed amendment seeks to empower judges to impose constitutional mandates in the name of equality that are unlikely to be enacted by statute, as well as to erode the conscience and religious liberty protections built into the human rights.

Potential impacts of the amendment include the imposition of state-subsidized fertility treatments or surrogacy arrangements for same-sex couples; mandating publicly funded gender transition therapy and surgery; further entrench abortion as a “right”; and allowing men to participate in women-only activities and spaces, compromising the safety and well-being of women.

Paid care leave

Polls show that Americans are increasingly delaying or giving up on starting a family due to economic insecurity. A 2018 New York Times survey found that 44% of respondents said they could not afford to have more children and 39% said not having enough paid family leave as a barrier to growth. of their family.

Business trade associations and labor advocacy groups have been deadlocked for years over a family leave proposal favored by House Democrats that would use a new payroll tax to create the equivalent of a workers compensation style system for paid vacation (HF 1200). MCC has communicated to lawmakers that HF ​​1200 is a reasonable way to create a family leave program, but the bill has no chance of passing the Republican-controlled Senate.

In an effort to break the deadlock, MCC participated in the hearing of the bill to remind lawmakers of the urgency of the issue and encourage them to find common ground for the common good. There are multiple ways to build a paid leave program, and for anything to succeed, it must recognize the reciprocal relationship and foster solidarity between employers and employees.

“Inside the Capitol” is an update from the staff of the Minnesota Catholic Conference.

Key words: Human Rights Act, identity politics, Minnesota Catholic Conference, paid caregiver leave, paid family leave

Category: Practicing Catholic

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LGBTQ rights group suspends Dallas hospitals from equality index after cuts to transgender care https://cflweb.org/lgbtq-rights-group-suspends-dallas-hospitals-from-equality-index-after-cuts-to-transgender-care/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 11:00:59 +0000 https://cflweb.org/lgbtq-rights-group-suspends-dallas-hospitals-from-equality-index-after-cuts-to-transgender-care/ The Human Rights Campaign, a national LGBTQ rights organization, suspended two Dallas hospitals from its healthcare inclusiveness rating system after the facilities closed the state’s only comprehensive medical program for transgender children to new patients. In a letter to leaders of Children’s Health and the University of Texas Southwestern sent Wednesday afternoon, the HRC said […]]]>

The Human Rights Campaign, a national LGBTQ rights organization, suspended two Dallas hospitals from its healthcare inclusiveness rating system after the facilities closed the state’s only comprehensive medical program for transgender children to new patients.

In a letter to leaders of Children’s Health and the University of Texas Southwestern sent Wednesday afternoon, the HRC said the program’s closure and lack of public communication about the decision led it to suspend hospitals from the 2020 Biennial Health Care Equality Index and “Best Performing” designations. .

Genecis – which stands for Gender Education and Care, Interdisciplinary Support – was a highly acclaimed seven-year program created by hospitals to provide transgender and gender-diverse young people with healthcare, including mental health counseling and hormone therapy.

“Decisions that have been made regarding the provision of medical care to transgender and gender-diverse youth put the lives of young people at risk – and require us to take action regarding both Children’s Medical Center Dallas and the status from the UT Southwestern Health Care Equality Index. said Jay Brown, HRC Foundation’s senior vice president for programs, research and training.

Until this change, Children’s Health and UT Southwestern scored 90 and 95 out of 100, respectively, on the HRC’s Healthcare Equality Index for their focus on caring for LGBTQ patients, visitors and employees. On its website, UT Southwestern points to the “best performer” designation as evidence of its focus on equity and access.

Late Wednesday evening, the two hospitals issued a written statement, saying they “remain committed to providing care and a welcoming environment for everyone, regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, social status or condition. cost-effective, and to ensure that our patients receive the care they need. The safety and privacy of our patients is our top priority.”

The hospitals said care for adult transgender patients continues in endocrinology, psychiatry and other departments at UT Southwestern, while pediatric care continues in specialty clinics. “As previously stated, the decision to remove branding from this care provides a more private and isolated experience for patients and families,” the hospitals said.

In November, hospitals said they would no longer accept new patients for puberty suppression or hormone therapy to treat gender dysphoria.

On Wednesday, hospitals said pre-existing care for pediatric patients had not been interrupted. “Additionally, we continue to accept new pediatric patients for psychiatric evaluation and other diagnoses, including the diagnosis of gender dysphoria. New pediatric patients are being seen in the appropriate specialist departments,” the hospitals said. “Similar to many other providers in the region, we will not initiate pediatric patients on hormone or puberty suppression therapy for this diagnosis.”

Republican politicians in Texas have increasingly thrust the medical treatment of transgender children into the spotlight in recent months as they enter a competitive re-election season next year.

Earlier this year, after state lawmakers unsuccessfully attempted to change state law to ban gender-affirming care, Gov. Greg Abbott encouraged child protective services to redefine the abuse to include surgery for trans youth.

The decision to close Genecis for new patients was criticized by more than 400 Texas doctors and healthcare professionals who signed a November letter to both hospitals denouncing the decision.

According to leading medical and child welfare groups in the state and nation, denying adolescents gender-affirming medical treatment risks causing psychological distress and increasing the risk of abuse and abuse. of stigma.

Health care for current Genecis patients will now be managed and coordinated by various specialized departments of Children’s Health and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, hospital officials said. They added that all references to Genecis have been removed from hospital websites to provide more security for these current patients.

The HRC has requested a meeting with hospital management in mid-November to discuss closing Genecis to new patients. The meeting was scheduled for early December and then canceled, according to the letter.

The organization then sent specific questions to the hospitals and received no response, the letter said.

“We would like to see some transparency about what is happening. But, more importantly, parents and children seeking care really want to know,” said Tari Hanneman, director of the HRC Foundation’s Health and Aging Program, in an interview. “There is a lot of fear and confusion about being able to access this care and a lack of clarity from institutions about what care is being provided.”

UT Southwestern and Children’s voluntarily participated in the HRC Equality Index, Hanneman said. They submitted a survey and other evidence to support their commitment to providing inclusive care for LGBTQ patients. HRC then gave the hospitals their previous scores, which are among the best for healthcare facilities.

Unless there is a ‘change of course’, HRC officials say they will apply a 25-point deduction that is part of the ‘responsible citizenship criteria’ to hospitals’ 2022 scores. Both hospitals will be featured in this year’s Health Care Equality Index report, due out in late March.

The HRC has invoked the point deduction for “responsible citizenship criteria” only once in the almost 15 years of the index’s existence. In the 2018 Index, Johns Hopkins Hospital received the 25-point deduction for “Johns Hopkins Medicine’s failure to address HRC concerns about deeply troubling anti-LGBTQ misinformation expressed and posted by members of the faculty,” according to the HRC website.

HRC also criticized UT Southwestern and Children’s Health for not providing the same access to treatment for trans and non-trans patients.

“This is discrimination and it is against your policy of non-discrimination of LGBTQ+ patients,” her letter reads.

West Campus Building 3, 2001 Inwood Rd., at UT Southwestern Medical Center on Wednesday, August 28, 2019 in Dallas.  (Smiley N. Pool/The Dallas Morning News)
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Biden’s latest proposal would force insurers to pay for gender ‘transition’ https://cflweb.org/bidens-latest-proposal-would-force-insurers-to-pay-for-gender-transition/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 19:06:36 +0000 https://cflweb.org/bidens-latest-proposal-would-force-insurers-to-pay-for-gender-transition/ President Joe Biden has sought to inject gender ideology into our laws since his first day in office. He might prefer a massive bill like the Equality Act that elevates the categories of “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the status of race and sex. But that effort has stalled in the Senate. So, for […]]]>

President Joe Biden has sought to inject gender ideology into our laws since his first day in office. He might prefer a massive bill like the Equality Act that elevates the categories of “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the status of race and sex. But that effort has stalled in the Senate. So, for now, his administration is looking for ways to insert the concepts of sexual orientation and gender identity into existing legislation.

The last? In January, the US Department of Health and Human Services proposed a rule that would add language of sexual orientation and gender identity to the Affordable Care Act of 2010. According to the department, these changes will ensure that people who identify as LGBT receive “medically necessary” care. This includes “gender-affirming” surgeries and hormonal “therapy”.

In fact, the department’s proposed rule circumvents the law and treats questionable treatments as essential health benefits in qualified health plans. This not only contradicts the best science and the best medicine, it is a disaster for insurers, for medical providers and, above all, for those who struggle with gender dysphoria.

Sex, gender and discrimination

The rule has legal issues, but we shouldn’t let that distract us from the fact that it gets to the heart of what it means to be human. To see this, it helps to keep a few definitions in mind.

The first is “sex”. Humans are a sexually dimorphic species. With very few exceptions (such as those resulting from disorders of sexual development, sometimes called “intersex”), everyone is clearly male or female. It’s biology. It is also common sense, as revealed by the testimony of each culture at each time and in all places of history.

Many people also affirm the gender binary of male and female for religious reasons. The book of Genesis, for example, says that God created us “male and female.”

The next term is “gender, which is best considered the social and psychological correlate of sex, as argued by sexologist Debra Soh. “Masculine” and “feminine” refer to sex. “Masculine” and “feminine” refer to gender.

Then there is “gender identity,” which comes from the lexicon of gender ideology. According to a popular definition, gender identity refers to the understanding and experience of a person of their own gender.

Note the circularity. Once detached from biological sex, gender identity can mean almost anything. Hence the current taxonomy of 72 genera – subject, of course, to expansion.

This subtle change in terms is essential. Behind “gender-affirming care” lies the hope of aligning the recipient’s body with their gender identity. Such “care”, however, is cosmetic at best. She can’t do the impossible: change someone’s sex with chemicals or scalpels.

The Department of Health and Human Services rule would indeed erase a key aspect of our humanity. In other words, it would replace biological sex as a criterion for medical care with a fluid and illusory notion of gender identity. This, in turn, would also serve as a precedent for other policy changes elsewhere in the administrative state.

Consciousness and reality of sex

Despite the infiltration of gender ideology into government bureaucracies, many people still know – for rational, scientific, medical and/or religious reasons – that sex is immutable. Doctors and government officials, they believe, should recognize sex as a human reality, not treat it as a fashion choice or, even less, as a tumor that can be surgically removed.

Many insurers, medical professionals and health insurance policyholders hold this view. And they will want nothing to do with chemical and surgical interventions for “gender transitioning” purposes. The new HHS rule, if approved, would force many medical professionals to violate their medical expertise and religious beliefs.

While supporters of the rule say it will comply with the Religious Freedom Restoration Act 1993 – which severely limits government interference in religious beliefs – the rule considers treatments that exclude religious interventions. gender assertion as “allegedly discriminatory”. But this can only conflict with the religious and medical consciences of many people and therefore break the law.

In any case, opinions based on reasonable medical, moral and religious beliefs and on the best interests of the patient have nothing to do with abhorrent discrimination. The federal government should not treat them as such.

Neither medically necessary nor helpful

But what if, as the proposed rule claims, “clinical evidence supports medically necessary gender-affirming care” and shows that such coverage “can significantly improve health and well-being? ” patients ?

Proponents claim gender-affirming care is medically necessary because the presumed alternative to hormones or surgeries is suicide. Thus, the explicit goal of this so-called care is to improve mental health, and therefore to prevent suicide.

Despite activists’ claims, clinical evidence shows otherwise. A 2019 study of the largest data set of patients who underwent gender-affirming surgeries “demonstrated no benefit of surgery over subsequent health care related to mood disorders or mood disorders.” ‘anxiety”. Likewise, he found no benefit from chemical interventions, such as cross-sex hormones.

The most in-depth follow-up study is much more disturbing. He reports that those who have undergone gender-affirming surgeries are, after 10 to 15 years, 20 times more likely to commit suicide than their comparable peers.

There are also serious risks for those who receive medication and surgery for the purpose of gender transition. Puberty blockers cause a decrease in bone density and prevent “sex steroid-dependent and adolescent brain organization and maturation.” Those who use cross-sex hormones have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, depression, and permanent sterilization, among others. “Sex reassignment” surgeries carry even more serious risks that lead to long-term complications and deterioration of mental health.

Misreading Bostock

Despite all of these issues with this HHS rule, the 2020 Supreme Court decision in Bostock v. Does Clayton County require it?

The Department of Health and Human Services seems to think so. It bases the proposed rule on two other directives. The first, “Preventing and Addressing Discrimination Based on Gender Identity or Sexual Orientation,” is an executive order that Biden issued on his first day in office. The second is the Ministry’s May 10, 2021 notice of execution.

In both documents, the administration cites the Supreme Court’s decision as grounds for expanding the meaning of sex discrimination to include sexual orientation and gender identity. However, this is a distortion of the court’s reasoning.

According to Judge Neil Gorsuch, the court proceeded “on the basis that ‘sex’ meant what the employers suggest, referring only to the biological distinctions between men and women. »

Gorsuch underscored the narrowness of the decision by stating that the ruling only applied to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which only deals with employment issues. He thus anticipated and postponed future efforts to apply Bostock to all civil rights regulations.

Additionally, the court pointed out that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act serves as a “super law.” Accordingly, in many contexts, the law protects actions that might otherwise violate a rule of non-discrimination. In appropriate cases, Gorsuch noted, the law could apply even to employment. Once again, Gorsuch sought to anticipate misreadings of the Bostock court ruling.

The new rule relies on such misreading. It lacks a legal basis for amending the proposed non-discrimination provisions and contradicts the ordinary meaning of sex discrimination laws.

Costly damage

From its misinterpretation of Bostock to its flawed medical evidence, this new rule is clearly the result of gender ideology, not sound science and good reason. If approved, the rule would further undermine evidence-based medical research and healthcare involving gender dysphoria.

This would force insurers, medical providers, and people enrolled in qualified health plans to pay for and/or perform harmful procedures that many of them would violate their medical expertise and religious beliefs. In short, the rule would violate basic American rights and harm the very people it seeks to help.

This piece originally appeared in The Daily Signal

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Tesla sued by black, gay worker claiming ‘unchecked’ racism (1) https://cflweb.org/tesla-sued-by-black-gay-worker-claiming-unchecked-racism-1/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/tesla-sued-by-black-gay-worker-claiming-unchecked-racism-1/ A black gay woman who worked in a Tesla Inc. The factory accused the electric vehicle maker in a lawsuit of “festering” racism while ignoring racial and homophobic slurs and the physical injuries it endured. Kaylen Barker, a former contract worker who inspected brake parts, is the latest to complain that Tesla ignores discrimination based […]]]>

A black gay woman who worked in a Tesla Inc. The factory accused the electric vehicle maker in a lawsuit of “festering” racism while ignoring racial and homophobic slurs and the physical injuries it endured.

Kaylen Barker, a former contract worker who inspected brake parts, is the latest to complain that Tesla ignores discrimination based on race, sexual orientation and gender at its factories. According to his complaint, his abuse occurred even as Tesla was defending another contract worker’s discrimination case in court – which the company lost and was ordered to pay $137 million in damages.

A white co-worker hit Barker with a hot grinding tool while calling him the n-word, ‘stupid, stupid’ and a ‘b—-‘, according to his complaint, filed in state county court on Tuesday. of Alameda, California. The co-worker was fired after Barker complained to Tesla’s human resources department, but was “shockingly rehired” about two weeks later “without any warning or explanation,” she said in her statement. complaint.

“I feel like I was tortured and sent back in time before African Americans had civil rights,” she said in a statement. Barker, 25, said she was “physically, mentally and emotionally abused” because she was “an African-American lesbian”.

Barker was hired to work at Tesla’s sub-assembly plant in Lathrop, Calif., by a staffing agency in February 2021. She was fired Oct. 29 after filing complaints with supervisors, the complaint says. – a decision that she qualifies as reprisals. She refused to sign a “document falsely admitting to dissent” even though human resources pressured her to do so daily for nearly a month before her dismissal, she said in her lawsuit.

Tesla, which does not have a public relations department, did not respond to an emailed request for comment.

Nearly three weeks before Barker was fired, the former Tesla human resources chief said a jury was wrong to award Owen Diaz $137 million for racial abuse at his factory in Fremont, California. Valerie Workerwho left Tesla earlier this year, said the company had “come a long way” in the fight against workplace harassment since 2015 and 2016.

Read more: Tesla looks like a ‘plantation,’ says lawyer who won lawsuits for workers

“Tesla says it’s changed, but it’s not a different company,” Barker’s attorney, Bernard Alexander, who also represented Diaz, said in an interview. “Now we have an employee,” who was discriminated against during and after the Diaz trial and “Tesla did next to nothing to protect her,” he said.

Tesla’s Fremont factory has long been the subject of racial and sexual harassment complaints. Many complaints never make it to court because full-time Tesla employees sign agreements requiring workplace disputes to be dealt with in closed-door arbitration, which itself has drawn fire Tesla investors.

In May, a former black employee won a rare $1 million discrimination award in arbitration for the company’s failure to stop his supervisors from calling him the “N-word.” The award Diaz won is considered one of the most significant verdicts in a race discrimination case by a single plaintiff.

Tesla challenged Diaz’s verdict as “unprecedented” and said in a court filing that it “has no relation to the actual evidence at trial.” A California federal judge has signaled that he will likely reduce the jury award, but has yet to issue a final decision on Tesla’s request for a new trial and reduced damage award.

(Adds complaint details to third and fifth paragraphs.)

–With the help of Dana Hull and Robert Burnson.

To contact the reporter on this story:
Malathi Nayak in San Francisco at mnayak21@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story:
Katia Porzecanski to kporzecansk1@bloomberg.net

Joe Schneider, Peter Jeffrey

© 2022 Bloomberg LP All rights reserved. Used with permission.

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