sex discrimination – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ Tue, 29 Mar 2022 04:41:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cflweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png sex discrimination – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ 32 32 Florida’s ‘Don’t Say Gay’ Bill Could Jeopardize Education Money https://cflweb.org/floridas-dont-say-gay-bill-could-jeopardize-education-money/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 13:51:37 +0000 https://cflweb.org/floridas-dont-say-gay-bill-could-jeopardize-education-money/ On March 8, the Florida Legislature voted to pass the Parental Rights in Education Bill – colloquially known as the “Don’t Say Gay” Bill (HB 1557) – which prohibits schools in the state from discussing sexual orientation or gender identity with students. third year and limits topics to only “age appropriate” discussions – which are […]]]>

On March 8, the Florida Legislature voted to pass the Parental Rights in Education Bill – colloquially known as the “Don’t Say Gay” Bill (HB 1557) – which prohibits schools in the state from discussing sexual orientation or gender identity with students. third year and limits topics to only “age appropriate” discussions – which are not defined – after this point. Students, parents and lawmakers have denounced the bill as blatantly homophobic and transphobic, ostracizing LGBTQ+ students and spawning a culture of intolerance in schools. But by passing this law, Florida is also putting its schools between a rock and a hard place: Schools may now have to decide whether to violate federal law by conforming to state law. Either way, students will suffer the consequences.

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Federal Civil Rights Act prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded educational programs, provides that “no one” shall, “on the basis of gender, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be discriminated against in an education program or activity. united in Bostock v. County of Clayton– in which the court found that Title VII, a civil rights law prohibiting sex discrimination in employment, also prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity – the Department of Education (ED) issued an Interpretation Notice on June 16, 2021, clarifying that Title IX “also prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity,” and ED will enforce this prohibition. Interpretation boards are telling schools nationwide that anti-LGBTQ+ discrimination will not be tolerated.

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Daily Mail apologizes to creative director Jo Wallace as libel case settled https://cflweb.org/daily-mail-apologizes-to-creative-director-jo-wallace-as-libel-case-settled/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 13:43:32 +0000 https://cflweb.org/daily-mail-apologizes-to-creative-director-jo-wallace-as-libel-case-settled/ Jo Wallace’s libel case against the Daily Mail and the Mail Online has been settled, with ‘substantial damages’ being paid to the creative director over false allegations in the publisher’s report into the case of sex discrimination JWT. The Daily Mail also agreed not to repost the accusations or images, to cover Wallace’s legal costs […]]]>

Jo Wallace’s libel case against the Daily Mail and the Mail Online has been settled, with ‘substantial damages’ being paid to the creative director over false allegations in the publisher’s report into the case of sex discrimination JWT.

The Daily Mail also agreed not to repost the accusations or images, to cover Wallace’s legal costs and to issue an apology.

Representatives for Wallace pointed out that the story “falsely alleged that plaintiff was responsible for gender discrimination in firing two straight white men in an attempt to erase their culture at the advertising agency for which they were all working. The allegation was extremely damaging to the Claimant’s reputation. »

He added: “Additionally, the articles published photographs which included seven photographs…taken without her permission…from her private Instagram account. Some depicted her on vacation, including sunbathing in a bikini, others showed intimate moments between the Claimant and his wife.

In addition to this charge of copyright infringement, the representatives claimed that Wallace had been subjected to a campaign of “threats, abuse and hate online, even receiving a threatening message that she is felt obligated to report to the police for her own protection”.

It ended thus: “The defendant’s publications had a lasting effect on the plaintiff because the articles were not only shocking and embarrassing, but because of their publication and the impression they made, she suffered a substantial harm to both her career and her reputation. In addition, the applicant is particularly distressed by the impact the articles have had on her family.”

Representatives of the defendant newspaper said: “The defendant, through me, sincerely apologizes to the plaintiff for the distress, embarrassment and upset caused to her by the publication of the Daily Mail article and the photographs impugned in the articles. The defendant admits that there was no truth to the allegations made in the Daily Mail article and that its copyright in the photographs was infringed. The defendant is happy to release clocks on time and to apologize to the plaintiff for the violation of her rights and for the distress caused to her by the publication of the articles.”

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Women are still angry – even as the public sector leads the way https://cflweb.org/women-are-still-angry-even-as-the-public-sector-leads-the-way/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 19:15:36 +0000 https://cflweb.org/women-are-still-angry-even-as-the-public-sector-leads-the-way/ The old stereotype that feminists are angry is coming true right now. Will women ever be happy? Well, no, not with the current state of gender equality in Australia. Recent data shows that the gender pay gap stands at 22.8%, that men are twice as likely to be in the highest income brackets as women, […]]]>

The old stereotype that feminists are angry is coming true right now. Will women ever be happy?

Well, no, not with the current state of gender equality in Australia. Recent data shows that the gender pay gap stands at 22.8%, that men are twice as likely to be in the highest income brackets as women, that women make up only 20 % of CEOs and that more than 50% of women have been sexually harassed.

Last year’s Global Gender Gap Report ranked Australia 50th out of 156 countries on gender equality, down from 15th.and in 2006. Although figures for this year are not yet available, Australian women may have fallen further. The pandemic has affected women disproportionately, increasing gender inequality as women have lost their jobs, received less government assistance than men, and taken on a greater share of domestic and care work.

Last year we saw an outpouring of anger from women, culminating in the March for Justice. Since then, the Australian government has taken steps to improve gender equality. As reported this week, the government has increased funding for domestic and family violence prevention, consent education campaigns and men’s behavior modification.

Although essential, these initiatives do not go far enough and the women are still angry. This week, a coalition of women leaders came together to call on the Australian government to do more. To close the gender pay gap, keep women safe at home and at work, provide accessible early childhood education and care, expand paid parental leave, introduce 10 days of paid violence leave family and implement the National Plan for Women and Girls.

This coalition also calls on the government to implement a key reform of Sex Discrimination Commissioner Kate Jenkins [email protected] report. The recommendation to include a positive duty in the Sex Discrimination Act would oblige employers to take proactive measures to prevent sex discrimination and sexual harassment.

Government intervention in all these areas is welcome. Organizations also have their role to play, of course. Over the past few months, APS has advanced several important initiatives to advance gender equality, including:

  • The APS Gender Equality Strategy was released late last year and focuses on advancing gender equality through leadership and accountability, making workplaces more respectful, changing gender stereotypes, increasing flexible working arrangements, including use by men.
  • Revision of the Maternity Leave (Commonwealth Employees) Act 1973. This is long overdue, as current legislation is outdated and reinforces traditional gender roles. This review offers the opportunity to extend paid parental leave in APS, as my colleagues and I have recommended.
  • Increased scrutiny of non-disclosure agreements – Agency heads are now required to consult or report to the APS commissioner before entering into an agreement with an employee that includes a non-disclosure provision. Non-disclosure provisions prevent people who have been sexually harassed from talking about the abuse. The removal of non-disclosure provisions was an important recommendation of the [email protected] report.
  • Attached to the Agency for professional equality between women and menalso following the [email protected] report, APS agencies will report progress on gender equality to the WGEA. This is also important, as monitoring, evaluation and reporting are key to seeing what worked and what areas need attention.

As the Australian Government takes steps to advance gender equality, we can see that APS is leading the way in this area. In an election year, a comprehensive policy to advance gender equality in Australian society and across all industry sectors could see all sectors become employers of choice for women.


READ MORE:

Gender equality data and indicators are key to changing workplace culture, review finds

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Judge rejects offer to reinstate UMN men’s gymnastics as lawsuit continues https://cflweb.org/judge-rejects-offer-to-reinstate-umn-mens-gymnastics-as-lawsuit-continues/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 23:13:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/judge-rejects-offer-to-reinstate-umn-mens-gymnastics-as-lawsuit-continues/ March 3 – A federal judge has denied a University of Minnesota student-athlete’s request to reinstate the men’s gymnastics program while his trial is pending. The Board of Regents voted in October 2020 to eliminate men’s gymnastics, along with tennis and indoor athletics, to reduce costs and better balance the number of sporting appearances between […]]]>

March 3 – A federal judge has denied a University of Minnesota student-athlete’s request to reinstate the men’s gymnastics program while his trial is pending.

The Board of Regents voted in October 2020 to eliminate men’s gymnastics, along with tennis and indoor athletics, to reduce costs and better balance the number of sporting appearances between men and women under the title IX.

Gymnast Evan Ng sued a year later, accusing the U of sex discrimination and seeking a preliminary injunction ordering the U to rejoin the team.

U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson this week denied the injunction. She said an injunction is meant to maintain the status quo while a lawsuit is pending, but Ng waited more than a year to seek it, long after the program was scrapped; no gymnastics coach and only four former gymnasts remain at the U.

Nelson also rejected the injunction because Ng is unlikely to win his case. She cited a similar case to Title IX in the Eighth Circuit, Chalenor v. University of North Dakota, which sought to reinstate men’s wrestling at the University of North Dakota in 1999.

“The factual circumstances here are essentially the same as at Chalenor. The University asserts that budgetary and gender equity issues lead” to the program’s demise, Nelson wrote.

“As in Chalenor, the plaintiff claims that the budget issues are pretenses because the Friends (group of alumni) offered to fund the program…But the Eighth Circuit has already rejected those arguments and, therefore, it does not there is no chance of success on the merits of Plaintiff’s Title IX claim.

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Counseling is key to ending sexual harassment https://cflweb.org/counseling-is-key-to-ending-sexual-harassment/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 05:56:28 +0000 https://cflweb.org/counseling-is-key-to-ending-sexual-harassment/ Australian company boards are ‘essential’ to stamping out sexual harassment in the workplace despite their reluctance, the Sex Discrimination Commissioner has said. Addressing the Australian Governance Summit on Wednesday, Kate Jenkins noted that only 19% of Australian companies agree that the board has the primary role in preventing and responding to sexual harassment. Ms Jenkins […]]]>

Australian company boards are ‘essential’ to stamping out sexual harassment in the workplace despite their reluctance, the Sex Discrimination Commissioner has said.

Addressing the Australian Governance Summit on Wednesday, Kate Jenkins noted that only 19% of Australian companies agree that the board has the primary role in preventing and responding to sexual harassment.

Ms Jenkins said that couldn’t be further from the truth.

“Boards feel that we can’t regulate the culture, that it’s a management issue, that HR should deal with it,” Ms Jenkins said.

“The time has come to end this hands-off approach to advice. Advice is at the heart of the change needed.”

Ms Jenkins said Australians were less likely to make formal complaints of sexual harassment at work, so company boards needed to be proactive.

She said organizations should look at tip lines and anonymous reporting because workers were more likely to come forward if they believed their jobs were not at risk.

The commissioner said companies could then track this information and identify common problems.

“If you’re expecting complaints, you’ll probably think you don’t have a problem,” Ms Jenkins told the Melbourne audience.

“When you look at our sexual harassment surveys and break them down by industry, you will realize that sexual harassment is quite prevalent in yours.”

Ms Jenkins also stressed the importance of diversity on boards, saying it would ensure the right questions are asked and key issues are not missed.

The commissioner said tackling workplace harassment isn’t about being the “fun police”.

“There’s this narrative that we have to make a joke,” Ms Jenkins said. “We’re not saying get rid of the fun.

“We say get rid of disgusting and unacceptable sexual comments that are hurtful.”

Ms Jenkins said the findings of the Commission’s latest national inquiry into sex discrimination will be published later this year.

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HRC launches ‘Reality Flag’ campaign to strengthen equality law https://cflweb.org/hrc-launches-reality-flag-campaign-to-strengthen-equality-law/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 15:04:25 +0000 https://cflweb.org/hrc-launches-reality-flag-campaign-to-strengthen-equality-law/ The Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest LGBTQ civil rights organization, announced the launch of a nationwide multimedia campaign to promote congressional approval of LGBTQ non-discrimination legislation known as the equality law. In a Feb. 23 statement, HRC says the campaign will include, among other things, a series of “powerful” social media and TV video […]]]>

The Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest LGBTQ civil rights organization, announced the launch of a nationwide multimedia campaign to promote congressional approval of LGBTQ non-discrimination legislation known as the equality law.

In a Feb. 23 statement, HRC says the campaign will include, among other things, a series of “powerful” social media and TV video ads created by Emmy Award-winning director Joey Soloway, which tell how the LGBTQ people are affected. by discrimination.

At the center of the campaign, as the videos show, is an American flag with 29 of the 50 stars removed to draw attention to the 29 states that lack comprehensive legal protections for LGBTQ people, which the HRC calls the “flag of reality”.

During its official campaign launch on Feb. 23, HRC unveiled an 85-foot-long version of the Reality Flag on the exterior wall of its DC headquarters, which HRC says is located just six blocks from the White House.

“The Reality Flag campaign is designed to highlight the inequalities that LGBTQ+ people face every day – in our own voice, said Joni Madison, Acting Chair of HRC. “From discrimination in housing and education to denial of government and health services, LGBTQ+ people face barriers to simply existing every day,” Madison said in a statement.

“That has to change,” she said. “The Reality Flag not only calls out to the 29 states where basic freedoms are still lacking for millions of people, but represents a symbol of hope that communities can rally together to implement meaningful change.”

The HRC’s Reality Flag campaign comes at a time when most political observers unaffiliated with staunch supporters and opponents of the Equality Act believe the bill has no chance of passing the US Senate anytime soon. , even though it passed the United States House in February 2021 by a vote of 224 to 206. In the House vote, only three Republicans joined the 221 Democrats in voting for the measure.

Observers note that although Democrats have a slim Republican Senate majority of 50 Democrats-50 with Vice President Kamala Harris poised to break a tie vote in favor of Democrats, the longstanding Senate filibuster rule that Democrats can’t change means the Equality Act needs a 60-vote majority to pass.

Forty-nine of 50 Senate Democrats have signed on as co-sponsors of the Equality Act. Maverick Democratic Senator Joe Manchin of West Virginia has become the only Senate Democrat to say he cannot support the Equality Act as it currently stands due, in part, to what Manchin says is its provisions for transgender non-discrimination in school sports and the use of school toilets.

Sources familiar with the Senate told the Washington Blade last May that even if the filibuster rule were eliminated, other Democratic senators from swing states would likely join Manchin in refusing to support the equality law. due to efforts by some Republicans to turn transgender rights into an inflammatory corner issue.

The official Congress website Congress.gov states that the Equality Act calls for prohibiting “discrimination on the basis of sex, sexual orientation and gender identity in areas such as public housing and facilities, ‘education, federal funding, employment, housing, credit and the jury system’. .”

The Congress.gov site adds, “The bill prohibits an individual from being denied access to a shared facility, including restrooms, locker rooms, and locker rooms, that is consistent with the gender identity of the individual. ‘individual.”

Several moderate GOP senators, including Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine), have said they support the principle of freedom from discrimination for LGBTQ people and would be willing to vote for a revised equality law that includes this which they call religious rights protections and some changes to transgender provisions.

Some Republican watchers have said enough Republicans would likely join Democrats to reach the 60 votes needed to pass the Senate Equality Act if Democrats accept the changes proposed by moderate Republicans.

However, other Republicans, including the national LGBTQ GOP group Log Cabin Republicans, have said the equality law should be scrapped altogether following the landmark 2020 U.S. Supreme Court ruling known as the name of Bostock c. Clayton County. The ruling states that Title VII of the US Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits sex discrimination, also prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

Proponents of the Equality Act have argued that legislation is still needed to ensure LGBTQ people are fully protected from discrimination in other areas such as housing and public accommodations.

Representatives from both sides have said negotiations have been underway over possible changes to the Equality Act since at least the start of last year, but nothing has emerged from those negotiations reported this week.

Many LGBTQ advocacy organizations, including the HRC, said the GOP had suggested changes to the Equality Act related to “religious freedom,” which supporters of the bill say means a right to discriminate against LGBTQ people on religious grounds in a non-religious setting such as a private business open to the public, is unacceptable.

Most LGBTQ advocacy groups have also declared unacceptable GOP proposals to weaken or remove protections for transgender people in legislation, saying these proposals are being promoted by people who have been misled or are misleading themselves. even mislead others to believe cisgender women in sports and in public restrooms. as well as in school bathrooms and showers would be adversely affected by the current version of the legislation.

With both sides in what most Capitol Hill watchers consider a complete stalemate, Senate Democrats, including Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (DN.Y.), have not indicated their will to put the Equality Act to a vote in the Senate this year.

Schumer’s office did not respond to a Blade inquiry last week asking if Schumer would consider bringing the Equality Act to the Senate for a vote this year or next year if Democrats retain control of the Senate during midterm elections of 2022.

With that as a backdrop, David Stacy, HRC’s Director of Government Affairs, told The Blade in a February 25 statement that passing the Equality Act remains a high priority for HRC and the LGBTQ+ community. .

“Passing legislation through the US Senate is not easy,” Stacy said. “In the meantime, support continues to grow for the bill, and we believe the Reality Flag campaign will continue to generate the awareness and education needed to continue to build support and pressure for action,” a- he declared.

“Since our launch, we’ve already seen people say they had no idea LGBTQ+ people didn’t already have these protections, and that’s what we aim to do here: educate people and inspire them. to take action at the grassroots level across the country – call their senators and make it clear to them that it’s time we need to do that,” Stacy said. “Some people may be ready to give up. We’re not. “, did he declare.

In its three-page statement announcing the launch of its Reality Flag campaign, HRC says the campaign is produced in partnership with a team of advertising and public relations agencies affiliated with international marketing and communications giant WPP.
“While the campaign aims to galvanize public support for the Equality Act and inspire public action on RealityFlag.com, it also highlights the importance of raising and showcasing the real stories and lived experiences of LGBTQ+ people affected by discrimination,” the statement continued.

It says stories about individual LGTQ people will primarily be featured in “video vignettes” created by television writer and director Joey Soloway, the Emmy Award-winning creator of “Transparent,” an original television comedy-drama series from ‘Amazon Studios on a Transgender. wife and her family. Soloway identifies as non-binary and gender non-conforming.

“These stories…will be amplified through both an advertising campaign, including partnerships with 20 national media platforms, achieving over 30 million impressions expected at launch, including TV, print, billboard, video, audio, film, OOH, social media and search,” the HRC statement read.

Access to some of the video ads planned for the HRC Reality Flag campaign is available at RealityFlag.com.

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Understanding the rules is everyone’s business, especially your boss’s business. https://cflweb.org/understanding-the-rules-is-everyones-business-especially-your-bosss-business/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/understanding-the-rules-is-everyones-business-especially-your-bosss-business/ Alison Mau is a senior reporter at Thingand weekly columnist for the Sunday Star-Times. OPINION: In a week when daily Covid-19 cases topped 12,000 and war broke out in Eastern Europe, a little article about menstrual discrimination in a Kiwi workplace might have escaped your notice. Understandable – pandemic and war are not trivial things. […]]]>

Alison Mau is a senior reporter at Thingand weekly columnist for the Sunday Star-Times.

OPINION: In a week when daily Covid-19 cases topped 12,000 and war broke out in Eastern Europe, a little article about menstrual discrimination in a Kiwi workplace might have escaped your notice. Understandable – pandemic and war are not trivial things. But neither is the health (and dignity) of about half the population.

In a way, it’s a tricky story to tell – for legal reasons, there can be no names attached, and very few details either. What we know, goes like this:

In 2020, a customer services office worker, Sarah*, took a sick day off due to a period-related illness. We don’t know what the exact symptoms were that led to Sarah’s sick day, but menstrual symptoms can include intense and painful cramps, migraines, body aches, fever, back pain – all of which will sound familiar to anyone, male or female, who has had the “flu”. Symptoms for those with endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome, or a list of other conditions may be more severe.

KIDSCAN

Being able to discreetly access sanitary items makes life much easier, say pupils at a school in Hastings. They were part of a KidsCan trial that provided educational kits, as well as vintage products. (First published in 2020)

READ MORE:
* Woman criticized by director for taking sick leave for menstrual pain settles complaint
* More than 100 Department of Education psychologists on strike due to staffing ‘crisis’
* Once parental leave was controversial, now menstrual leave policies are sparking debate
* Menopause: The taboo of work that makes women suffer in silence

Sarah claims she was criticized by her manager for taking the day off sick. Understanding her rights under Aotearoa New Zealand’s anti-discrimination laws, she filed a complaint with the Human Rights Commission (HRC). At that time, when a complaint has been filed, the HRC will help facilitate mediation between the parties if both agree (mediation is voluntary). If this is not taken up for any reason, or does not result in a resolution.

As OHRP attorney Nicole Browne told me, there are pretty strict rules for this; OHRP has a responsibility to put public money to good use, which means that only important cases succeed.

OHRP lawyer Nicole Browne said Sarah* had clearly been discriminated against because of her gender.

Thing

OHRP lawyer Nicole Browne said Sarah* had clearly been discriminated against because of her gender.

Browne described Sarah’s case as “a really clear case of gender discrimination“.

“We’re unlikely to take a losing case unless there’s really strong public interest.”

So why was Sarah’s case so important? Let’s deal with the big picture first.

Periods are a common experience, but one that is rarely talked about. As one blogger put it in 2020: “Periods are a bodily function, just like being hungry or thirsty. When you are hungry, you eat. When you are thirsty, you drink. When you have your period, you are ashamed.

The shame that society places on menstruation applies to almost everything that comes out of a woman’s body – sweat, leaking breast milk, etc. – but menstrual blood tops the list. I’d like to say that I openly and confidently walked up to a colleague and asked him in a Ordinary voice (instead of a furtive whisper) if they have a spare pad, but that would be a lie.

There are fathers and brothers and sons and boyfriends who are still too uncomfortable to buy sanitary products, writes Alison Mau.

Natracare/Unsplash

There are fathers and brothers and sons and boyfriends who are still too uncomfortable to buy sanitary products, writes Alison Mau.

This is an absurd taboo, based on the belief – believed to have been first mentioned in writing in the Latin Encyclopedia in AD 73 – that bleeding (but only this type of bleeding) is dirty and unsanitary. Which is not the case. But consider how incredibly sticky this myth has been. Sticky to the point that it’s only in very recent history that menstrual poverty and sick leave options have been brought up publicly. There are fathers, brothers, sons and boyfriends who will still feel too uncomfortable buying tampons and sanitary napkins for the women in their lives, as if a bundle wrapped and wrapped on a supermarket shelf was, in itself, somehow dirty.

Not their fault. Blame it on the patriarchal society. But absurd.

We are beginning to address this stigma and its effects. Since the middle of last year, schools have been able to access free period products for their pupils through the Ministry of Education. The ministry’s website notes that as of June 2021, 1,619 schools and kura have joined the program, “meaning that nearly 90% of estimated students who have periods are in schools that have opted in.”

Sector workers I have spoken to say the program is working well and will keep students in school who might otherwise miss classes because there is no money for towels or pads.

Auckland Girls Grammar School is one of those that have signed up to roll out the government's period product to schools in June 2021.

David White / Stuff

Auckland Girls Grammar School is one of those that have signed up to roll out the government’s period product to schools in June 2021.

Many working women want their organizations to follow this example, and some women-led workplaces do, but not all of us can work for women-led organisations.

Which leads to situations like that of Alisha Coleman, in 2017. Coleman, a 911 call center employee in the United States, sued her employer under US civil rights law after being fired for leaking menstrual blood at work.

Coleman, who was postmenopausal and experiencing unexpected heavy periods, settled with her employer after the American Civil Liberties Union appealed a court ruling that she had failed to prove sex discrimination under of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.

It’s impossible to read Coleman’s case without imagining the distress she must have felt at the time. But Coleman nailed it in his statement after the case was settled.

“I hope my speaking out will encourage other women who believe they have experienced discrimination in any form to come forward.”

And so, back to Sarah, whose settlement with her former employer is important for the same reason.

Women at work may not be getting a massive reprimand, but a series of microaggressions.” But that tells people like Sarah, “your symptoms don’t deserve sick leave. It’s ingrained sexism.”

The idea of ​​periodic leave (as opposed to “normal” sick leave) continues to be divisive. But organizations that have embraced it, in Australia and elsewhere, have described it as a “win-win” situation.

Workers feel more supported and productive and, most importantly, they don’t abuse ‘privilege’. The 13 female workers at the Victorian Women’s Trust, for example, have taken just eight days of periodic leave between them in the three years since the scheme was introduced to the trust in 2016. The women know when their symptoms are going to work is a bad idea, and they should be trusted to make that call.

For people who menstruate (and I include those who were born female but no longer identify as such), Sarah’s case is important because it calls for putting women down for things they don’t. cannot biologically control.

And that raises the flag for others in his situation, who may not know there is a way to fight back.

*This is not his real name.

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Georgia Senate Passes Bill 435, “Save Girls’ Sports Act” https://cflweb.org/georgia-senate-passes-bill-435-save-girls-sports-act/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/georgia-senate-passes-bill-435-save-girls-sports-act/ The bill is now returned to the House for consideration. ATLANTA — A state Senate bill that would bar transgender athletes from participating in gender-aligned school sports is becoming law in Georgia. Senate Bill 435 cleared a major hurdle this week. While the “Save Girls’ Sports Act” still has some way to go before impacting […]]]>

The bill is now returned to the House for consideration.

ATLANTA — A state Senate bill that would bar transgender athletes from participating in gender-aligned school sports is becoming law in Georgia.

Senate Bill 435 cleared a major hurdle this week. While the “Save Girls’ Sports Act” still has some way to go before impacting Georgia schools, the bill has already surpassed a nearly identical bill from last year’s session.

The bill seeks to require Georgian students to participate in high school sports based on the sex listed on their birth certificates, prohibiting “a person whose sex is male from participating in any interscholastic or intramural sports reserved for women“.

The bill applies a definition of gender at odds with the global medical consensus, which views gender as “socially constructed” and not immutable from birth.

The Georgia bill states that gender “means the biological sex of a person which is to be recognized solely on the basis of a person’s reproductive biology and genetics at birth.”

The bill passed the Senate on Thursday and is now heading to the House for consideration.

Governor Brian Kemp showed his support for the bill in his State of the State address, saying, “I strongly support [legislation] to ensure equity in school sports.

The legislation, sponsored by more than two dozen Republicans in addition to Kemp, has cultivated controversy across party lines since its introduction.

“We segregate athletes based on their wrestling weight or age group or height, said Rep. Philip Singleton (R-Sharpsburg), who introduced a similar bill at a previous legislative session. “Their biological sex is a category in which they are separated so that there is parity on the sports field.”

Lambda Legal, an LGBTQ civil rights legal organization that houses an office in Decatur, said the bill would harm students and violate federal law.

“The exclusion of transgender students from athletics is not only harmful to these students, it also violates federal law and puts schools at great risk of liability. For example, SB 435 would effectively bar transgender students from participating in athletics, in violation of Title IX, the federal law prohibiting sex discrimination in education,” said Lambda Legal Southern Regional Director Michael Shutt, in a press release.

Senate Bill 266, nearly identical to this year’s Save Girls’ Sports Act, was passed by the Senate Education and Youth Affairs Committee in last year’s legislative session. The bill, however, failed to make it to the Senate. With support from conservative Peach State leaders through an election year and more than two dozen Republican co-sponsors, this year’s version has already surpassed its predecessor.

With a split of 102 Republicans to 77 Democrats in the Georgia House of Representatives, the GOP has the power to establish it as law.

For Jen Slipakoff of Kennesaw, the mother of a 14-year-old girl who transitioned to kindergarten, the bill unnecessarily targets transgender children.

“I think trans kids already go through their lives feeling like all eyes are on them, feeling different, like they don’t belong. And what do we do? We enact a law that literally says you don’t belong,” Slipakoff told 11Alive’s Doug Richards.

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Appeals court reviews Florida transgender restroom case https://cflweb.org/appeals-court-reviews-florida-transgender-restroom-case/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 03:09:22 +0000 https://cflweb.org/appeals-court-reviews-florida-transgender-restroom-case/ TALAHASSEE – In a closely watched case that could have national repercussions, a federal appeals court on Tuesday peppered lawyers with questions in a lawsuit over whether a northeast Florida high school should have barred a transgender student to use the boys’ toilets. The lawsuit has drawn the attention of dozens of the nation’s largest […]]]>

TALAHASSEE – In a closely watched case that could have national repercussions, a federal appeals court on Tuesday peppered lawyers with questions in a lawsuit over whether a northeast Florida high school should have barred a transgender student to use the boys’ toilets.

The lawsuit has drawn the attention of dozens of the nation’s largest corporations, 70 sexual assault and domestic violence organizations, a myriad of LGBT advocacy groups and the US Department of Justice.

The case also became a battleground for 40 states and the District of Columbia who signed briefs in the case, which stemmed from a St. Johns County School Board policy that prevented Drew Adams from using the boys’ toilets.

Adams and her mother sued in 2017 after Nease High School asked her to use a gender-neutral one-stall bathroom or a girls’ bathroom. A U.S. District Judge sided with Adams, leading the St. Johns County School Board to take the case to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

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The full federal appeals court heard arguments Tuesday after a three-judge court panel ruled in favor of Adams in July. The Atlanta court later overturned the panel’s decision and ordered what is called an “en banc” hearing, or full hearing.

The arguments centered on whether the school board’s policy violated constitutional rights to equal protection and Title IX, a federal law that prohibits discrimination based on sex. The board argued that the restrictions placed on Adams were necessary to address students’ privacy and safety concerns.

“The question here is whether the policy discriminates against transgender students, and isn’t it true that transgender students must use either the birth-assigned sex toilet or a unisex toilet?” Judge Robin Rosenbaum asked Jeffrey Slanker, an attorney who represents the school board. “Why doesn’t this discriminate against transgender students? »

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“I would not concede that the policy discriminates against a student,” Slanker said, adding that the policy “had nothing to do with Mr. Adams’ gender identity or the identity of type of students”.

The school district ruled that Adams must use the bathroom of the gender identified on the district’s enrollment documents. Adams enrolled in the school district as a girl in fourth grade and came out as a transgender boy to his parents in eighth grade, according to court records. He graduated from high school as the case continued.

“Andrew Adams was treated differently because he was identified as a gender at birth and identifies as male today,” Tara Borelli, an attorney at Lambda Legal who represents Adams, told the appeals court on Tuesday, adding that it is “precisely what” a 2020 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in a case known as Bostock v. Clayton County “declares sex discrimination to be impermissible”.

But some judges have worried about how far schools should go to accommodate students.

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“What happens when you have a gender-fluid student who is anatomically, biologically male and identifies on Monday as female and wants to use the bathroom?” Justice Barbara Lagoa, a former Florida Supreme Court justice, asked.

Borelli pointed to a policy she says has been in place for “many, many years” in Broward County.

“What they do is they try to make sure the request is genuine,” she said.

Earlier court testimony “showed that no one ever discovered any issues with the suitors,” Borelli said.

But Judge Kevin Newsom pressed Borelli about a hypothetical student who “really doesn’t belong with the boys, is bullied by the boys, and asks for accommodation to attend the girls’ PE class and claims he will be emotionally traumatized” if he is not allowed to do so.

“Isn’t that also sex discrimination according to your theory?” Newsom asked.

“You know, I’m not sure I’ve heard of such a hypothetical student, and it certainly wouldn’t speak to a transgender student,” Borelli said. “The evidence here in this case is that a transgender student is someone who consistently, persistently and insistently identifies as a different sex than their sex at birth. … I’m not sure the answer would be d send that student to the girls’ locker room, your honor.

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Elizabeth Hecker, an attorney with the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, said there may be other ways for schools to address a cisgender student in the scenario Newsom described without breaking the law. Anti-Discrimination Title IX.

“Whereas here the only way to fix Mr. Adams’ hurt was to let him use the men’s room because not being able to was what hurt him,” Hecker said.

Judge Charles Wilson asked Slanker how the school would deal with students who had “anatomical changes” between grades 11 and 12.

“Does the policy say anything about that?” He asked.

“The policy is quite simple. It just says a biological male should use the male chamber, biological females should use the female chamber, Slanker said.

In a brief filed in October, the school board argued that its policy “stands up to constitutional scrutiny because it is grounded in real and enduring gender differences. Recognizing these differences when making political decisions is not a form of gender stereotyping. School board policy is simply not the type of stereotype-based classification that the equal protection clause prohibits.

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But the Justice Department disputed the council’s justification, relying in part on the Bostock decision which found that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects employees from discrimination because they are gay or transgender.

“First, prohibiting Adams from using the boys’ restroom does not reinforce the school board’s asserted interest in privacy, because the boys’ restrooms at Adams High School have individual, private stalls designed to prevent exposure of a student’s anatomy,” Biden said. the administration’s attorneys wrote in a November brief. “Second, the school board’s refusal to accept updated documents to determine a transgender student’s gender is arbitrary.”

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U.S. Women’s Football Scoring Equal Pay Settlement, Skim https://cflweb.org/u-s-womens-football-scoring-equal-pay-settlement-skim/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 23:11:23 +0000 https://cflweb.org/u-s-womens-football-scoring-equal-pay-settlement-skim/ The United States Women’s National Soccer Team (USWNT) has just scored one of its biggest goals yet – a major equal pay victory. On February 22, the team colonized their pay discrimination lawsuit against the U.S. Soccer Federation for $24 million – also securing equal pay in sports for future athletes. Here’s your Skimm on […]]]>

The United States Women’s National Soccer Team (USWNT) has just scored one of its biggest goals yet – a major equal pay victory. On February 22, the team colonized their pay discrimination lawsuit against the U.S. Soccer Federation for $24 million – also securing equal pay in sports for future athletes. Here’s your Skimm on how we got here and how it could impact women on and off the court.

Started out by… being severely underpaid

For decades, the United States women’s soccer team dominated the men’s. The USWNT have won the World Cup four times since the program began in 1985. They also won gold medals at the Summer Olympics in 2004, 2008 and 2012. Meanwhile, the men’s team did not reach a semi-final since 1930. And did not win a medal since 1904. And yet, the women’s team was paid less. These facts kicked off a legal battle that has been in the headlines for years and ultimately ended in a major gooooaaaal.

Psst…to learn more about the gender pay gap, see our guide.

In 2016, five players (including stars Megan Rapinoe, Carli Loyd and Alex Morgan) filed a complaint with the EEOC. They accused the United States Soccer Federation of pay discrimination, saying they earned about 40% of what the men’s team earned. Yes, 40%. Three years later, 28 team members file a class action lawsuit trial. To say that the federation violated the Equal Pay Act and Title VII Civil Rights Act. And accused him of “institutionalized gender discrimination.” That same year, the team won the Women’s World Cup — to famous applause from the fans.”equal payin the stands. A moment that drew widespread attention for their push for equal pay in sport.

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And it wasn’t easy… but now we’re here

Over the past two years, players have faced number of bumps on the ground, uh, road to equal pay. But in February, the two sides finally reached an agreement. The fine print: US Soccer has agreed to pay $22 million in back wages to the players in the case. An additional $2 million would go into a fund that players would use for post-career goals and charitable efforts (each player can request up to $50,000). And, most notably, the federation promised to pay the men’s and women’s teams equally in the future. Including for all tournaments like the World Cup.

“Justice comes into the next generation without ever having to go through what we’ve been through,” Rapinoe said. on CBS Mornings. “It’s equal pay across the board from now on.”

But the decision hinges on the ratification of a new contract between US Soccer and the players’ union. The contract would resolve all remaining claims in the sex discrimination lawsuit. And then the settlement would be approved by a district court in the coming weeks. Ahead of Equal Pay Day on March 15, it’s a goal worth celebrating. And as Rapinoe said: “I think we’re all going to look back on that moment with incredible pride. If you don’t pay attention to that right now and what’s going on in women’s sport, you’re sleeping on all. “

theSkimm

The rulebook for women’s soccer in the United States is a historic victory, not just for the players, but for the women of the sports world. Given that American women still earn a fraction of the salary of their male colleagues (think: around 80 cents on the male dollar), we hope the success of the women’s team sets a long-awaited example in other industries as well. .

Skimmed by Macy Alcido, Maria McCallen and Kamini Ramdeen-Chowdhury

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