Trans Issues – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://cflweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Trans Issues – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ 32 32 Tucson nonprofit seeks community of small houses for transgender women of color | Local news https://cflweb.org/tucson-nonprofit-seeks-community-of-small-houses-for-transgender-women-of-color-local-news/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/tucson-nonprofit-seeks-community-of-small-houses-for-transgender-women-of-color-local-news/ “What we want is to build communities” Jones began fighting for transgender rights while attending Phoenix Community College. During her transition, her access to the fitness center locker rooms was revoked and she found herself having to speak out. “It was the first time that I became an activist,” she said. After graduating from social […]]]>

“What we want is to build communities”

Jones began fighting for transgender rights while attending Phoenix Community College. During her transition, her access to the fitness center locker rooms was revoked and she found herself having to speak out.

“It was the first time that I became an activist, she said.

After graduating from social work, Jones began working as a speaker, teaming up with nonprofits that advocate for transgender rights, as well as the rights of sex workers.

A few years ago, she started her own nonprofit, named after her late friend and longtime activist Sharmus Outlaw.

Project Outlaw began working to change policies, rather than providing direct services to those in need, but Jones said she had always had a vision to create a community of small homes for transgender women.

“Sharmus, although she was an amazing political person, because she was a black transgender woman, she didn’t have a safe place to live,” Jones said.

“I wanted to make mini-houses after going to South Africa for an international AIDS conference,” she added.

During his trip, Jones saw shipping containers that had been turned into offices and mobile HIV testing sites, quickly realizing that they could also be used as homes.


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Why isn’t JK Rowling at the Harry Potter reunion? https://cflweb.org/why-isnt-jk-rowling-at-the-harry-potter-reunion/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 20:40:35 +0000 https://cflweb.org/why-isnt-jk-rowling-at-the-harry-potter-reunion/ JK Rowling is a notable omission from the upcoming Harry Potter reunion, and there’s a pretty clear reason she was snubbed. She single-handedly created one of the most distinguished fictional worlds in the history of literature, cinema and popular culture. But the author of Harry Potter JK Rowling not invited to star in upcoming franchise […]]]>

JK Rowling is a notable omission from the upcoming Harry Potter reunion, and there’s a pretty clear reason she was snubbed.

She single-handedly created one of the most distinguished fictional worlds in the history of literature, cinema and popular culture.

But the author of Harry Potter JK Rowling not invited to star in upcoming franchise reunion special, Harry Potter 20th Anniversary: ​​Return to Hogwarts, which leaves the frenzy this evening.

It is one of the most controversial snapshots in recent memory. The special will bring together everyone from the film’s main trio, Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint and Emma Watson, to extended cast and directors, as they revisit the Warner Bros. setting in London and discuss the franchise’s enduring legacy. of films.

At first glance, it seems weird not to feature Rowling, who was responsible for concocting this world even when she wrote Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone on an old manual typewriter in 1995.

But the sparkle around Rowling – reportedly worth $ 1.5 billion thanks to her editing work – has started to wane in recent years, starting in late 2019 when she made damning comments about the community. transgender, who was widely considered to be transphobic.

Despite widespread backlash, Rowling has repeatedly doubled down on her comments and continues to spark controversy with her steadfast stance.

When did it all get out of hand?

In December 2019, Rowling made headlines for publicly supporting Maya Forstater, a researcher fired for tweeting that “men can’t turn into women.”

Forstater’s comments, which had been deemed “unworthy of respect” by an employment tribunal, were later backed up by Rowling on her Twitter account.

“Dress however you see fit,” Rowling wrote. “Call yourself whatever you want. Sleep with any consenting adult who gets you. Live your best life in peace and security. But forcing women to quit their jobs for saying that sex is real? #IStandWithMaya. ”

Amid the Black Lives Matter protest movement and the Covid-19 pandemic last year, Rowling doubled down on her transphobic messages.

Posting an article on Twitter with the headline “People Who Have Their Periods,” Rowling joked about the wording, writing, “People who have their period. I’m sure there was a word for these people. Someone is helping me. Wumben? Wimpund? Woomud? “

After resisting the backlash, Rowling once again maintained her sentiment.

“If the sex isn’t real, there is no same-sex attraction,” she tweeted. “If sex is not real, the lived reality of women around the world is erased. I know and love trans people, but erasing the concept of sex takes away the ability for many to discuss their lives in a meaningful way. It is not hate to speak the truth.

“I respect the right of every trans person to live in a way that they feel is genuine and comfortable,” she continued. “I would walk with you if you were discriminated against on the basis of being trans. At the same time, my life has been shaped by being a woman. I don’t think it’s obnoxious to say it.

Rowling doubles in stunning statement

In a 3,600-word statement posted to her website on June 10, 2020, Rowling did not back down, arguing that she needed to speak out on these issues because she believed trans rights eroded the rights of biological women.

“I knew perfectly well what was going to happen when I supported Maya. I must have been on my fourth or fifth cancellation by this time. I expected threats of violence, to be told that I was literally killing trans people with my hate, to be called c ** t and b *** h and, of course, that my books be burnt, ”she began.

“I am a former teacher and founder of a children’s charity, which gives me an interest in both education and safeguarding. Like many others, I am deeply concerned about the effect the trans rights movement is having on both.

“As a highly banned author, I am interested in freedom of expression and have defended it publicly, even to Donald Trump.

“Where things start to get really personal. I worry about the huge explosion of young women wanting to make the transition and also the growing number of women who seem to be in detransition (back to their original sex), because they regret having taken measures that have, in some cases irrevocably altered their body, and took away their fertility.

“Some say they decided to make the transition after realizing that they were attracted to the same sex, and that the transition was in part driven by homophobia, either in society or in their families.”

It’s safe to say the statement didn’t go well.

Harry Potter stars speak out

Daniel Radcliffe – who played Harry Potter – led comments against Rowling’s statement.

“Jo is unquestionably responsible for the course my life has taken,” Radcliffe wrote in a statement released by The Trevor project, an organization that works in crisis prevention for LGBTQ youth. “As a human being, I feel compelled to say something right now… Transgender women are women. Any statement to the contrary erases the identity and dignity of transgender people and flies in the face of any advice given by professional health associations who have much more expertise on this subject than Jo or I.

“I am deeply sorry for the pain these comments have caused you. If these books have taught you that love is the most powerful force in the universe, capable of overcoming anything; if they taught you that strength is in diversity, and that dogmatic ideas of purity lead to the oppression of vulnerable groups …

“If you’ve found something in these stories that touched you and helped you at any point in your life, then it’s between you and the book you’ve read, and that’s sacred. And in my opinion, no one can touch it.

Stream Harry Potter 20th Anniversary: ​​Return to Hogwarts on BINGE starting January 1. New customers get a 14-day free trial. Register on binge.com.au

Around the same time, Watson also made a statement, tweeting: “Trans people are who they say they are and deserve to live their lives without being constantly questioned or told they are not what they are. ‘they claim to be. I want my trans followers to know that me and so many other people around the world see you, respect you and love you for who you are.

Finally, Grint also launched its own response in a statement.

“I strongly support the trans community. Trans women are women. Trans men are men. We should all have the right to live in love and without judgment, ”said Grint.

Recent tweet leaves fans fed up

Rowling shared an article in mid-December of London time which was titled: “‘Absurdity’ of rapists recorded by police as women”. The article explained how Scottish police would register rape suspects as women if that is how they identify themselves, even if they have not legally changed their gender.

Rowling tweeted: “War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is a force. The convicted person who raped you is a woman.

Thousands of fans immediately attacked Rowling, with many accusing her of having an unhealthy fixation on trans issues.

“You literally have a castle and you spend your time doing that,” podcaster Rob Rousseau wrote.

“What an odd hill to die on Rowling,” added producer Brett Erlich.

Rowling has yet to comment on her snub about the reunion, but despite the impact of her comments, she said she won’t back down.

“I have now received so many death threats that I could line the house with them, and I haven’t stopped talking,” Rowling wrote in a recent tweet.

“Maybe – and I’m just saying this over there – the best way to prove that your movement is not a threat to women is to stop harassing us, harassing us and us. to menace.”

Harry Potter 20th Anniversary: ​​Return to Hogwarts Preview January 1

Originally published as Why JK Rowling was snubbed from the Harry Potter reunion


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Judges told they can ban press from reporting former name of transgender defendant https://cflweb.org/judges-told-they-can-ban-press-from-reporting-former-name-of-transgender-defendant/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 11:02:29 +0000 https://cflweb.org/judges-told-they-can-ban-press-from-reporting-former-name-of-transgender-defendant/ Judges are told they can ban the press from reporting the former name of a transgender defendant – or even make the court appearance completely secret The privacy rights of trans accused must be upheld in court, according to guidelines 540-page “Equal Treatment Reference Book” provides the judiciary with the latest advice If necessary, reporting […]]]>

Judges are told they can ban the press from reporting the former name of a transgender defendant – or even make the court appearance completely secret

  • The privacy rights of trans accused must be upheld in court, according to guidelines
  • 540-page “Equal Treatment Reference Book” provides the judiciary with the latest advice
  • If necessary, reporting bans should be made on the disclosure of birth names and history
  • Even witnesses may be compelled to use correct pronouns to testify










Judges have been told they can ban the disclosure of a transgender defendant’s former name – or keep his court appearance in total secrecy.

The “Egal Treatment Bench Book,” a 540-page document produced by the Judicial College, advises courts to avoid using gendered language and pronouns whenever possible and offers guidance for dealing with trans issues in court. courts.

The document is produced by the Judicial College – responsible for training county, crown and higher court judges in England and Wales, and court judges in England and Wales, Scotland and North Ireland.

It states that a person’s “sex at birth or transgender background” should not be disclosed unless it is “necessary and relevant to the particular legal process”.

The directive continues: “In the rare circumstances where it is necessary in the proceedings to disclose a person’s previous name and transgender background, the court may consider imposing reporting restrictions to prevent disclosure of such information. more broadly or order a private hearing. “

The Bench Book states that the Gender Recognition Act 2004 (Section 22) “explicitly prohibits the disclosure of ‘protected information’ when a person has applied for or obtained a gender recognition certificate.

The law makes an exception when the disclosure is for the purposes of a proceeding in a court or tribunal, but this exception “should be interpreted narrowly,” says the Bench Book.

College president and Court of Appeal judge Lady Justice King (pictured) said the guidelines are a “living document” that has served as a key benchmark for the courts

The “Egal Treatment Bench Book,<a class=” a 540-page document produced by the Judicial College, advises courts to avoid using gendered language and pronouns whenever possible and offers guidance for dealing with trans issues in court. courts. It states that the “genre à la naissance ou les antécédents transgenres” d’une personne ne doivent pas être divulgués à moins que cela ne soit “nécessaire et pertinent pour la procédure judiciaire particulière”” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

The “Egal Treatment Bench Book,” a 540-page document produced by the Judicial College, advises courts to avoid using gendered language and pronouns whenever possible and offers guidance for dealing with trans issues in court. courts. It states that a person’s “birth gender or transgender background” should not be disclosed unless it is “necessary and relevant to the particular legal process”

Judge slammed victim for refusing to call her trans attacker “she” in court

A judge criticized the assault victim for refusing to call her transgender attacker “her” in court.

Tara Wolf, 26, punched Maria MacLachlan, 61, at Speakers’ Corner in Hyde Park in 2017 when protesters clashed over trans women‘s rights.

She was ordered to pay £ 430 in fines and costs after a judge said the language of the transgender debate was “adversarial to say the least”.

Ms MacLachlan, who describes herself as a ‘gender critical feminist’, had her £ 120 Panasonic camera ripped off by Hooded Wolf, who identifies as a woman.

Wolf claimed she was terrified that images of her would be used to denounce her as transgender and acted in self-defense.

She denied being beaten up but was found guilty by Hendon magistrates.

In delivering his verdict in April 2018, District Judge Kenneth Grant called Miss MacLachlan unsightly for failing to call Wolf “her” during the two-day trial.

He said: “When I asked Miss MacLachlan to name the accused as herself, she reluctantly did so.

“After asking her to refer to Miss Wolf as her out of courtesy, she continued to refer to Miss Wolf as him and him.

“The language of debate is antagonistic and hostile.

Wolf admitted before attending the rally that she posted on a Facebook event page: “I wanna fuck TERFS [Trans-Exterminatory Radical Feminists] they are no better than FASH. [Fascists]’.

Wolf, of Stratford, east London, denied being beaten up but was found guilty by magistrates in Hendon and ordered to pay a fine of £ 150, a victim fine surcharge of £ 30 and costs of £ 250 lawsuit.

Its latest revision also advises courts to avoid using gendered language and pronouns whenever possible, The temperature reports.

It also raises the scenario of an offender who has changed their sex and their right to be returned to court using their preferred pronoun.

The guidelines read: “There may be situations where a witness’s rights to refer to a trans person by pronouns corresponding to their assigned sex at birth, or to otherwise disclose a person’s trans status, come into play. in conflict with a trans person’s right to privacy. ”

He continued: “In the rare circumstances where it is necessary in the proceedings to disclose a person’s previous name and transgender background, the court may consider imposing reporting restrictions to prevent disclosure of such information. more broadly or order a private hearing. “

College President and Court of Appeal Judge Lady Justice King said the guidance is a “living document” which has served as a key benchmark for the courts and has been “admired and envied by magistrates across the country. whole world “.

Among its suggestions for more neutral language, the college advises judges to use the term “flight attendant” instead of “flight attendant” and “president” instead of “president”.

“It is important to respect a person’s gender identity by using appropriate terms of address, names and pronouns. Everyone has the right to respect for their gender identity, their private life and their personal dignity, ”he adds.

The guide also stated, “The term ‘queer’ is quickly being accepted as an umbrella term for those who are not narrowly heterosexual and non-cisgender (that is, identifying with their birth sex).

“Stonewall indicates that the term queer has been picked up by young people in particular who do not identify with traditional categories around sexual orientation and / or gender identity.

“He also became associated with various artistic and cultural movements around the world and entered the academic discourse.

‘Nevertheless [the term queer] is still considered pejorative by some people from LGBT communities, and it is therefore to be avoided ”.

In criminal cases involving violence against women, the college said, “Some people object to the term ‘victim’ because it can imply passivity and helplessness. They may prefer the word “survivor” which can express resilience. ”


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Article on the arts: best music documentaries of 2021 – and some disappointments https://cflweb.org/article-on-the-arts-best-music-documentaries-of-2021-and-some-disappointments/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 19:00:25 +0000 https://cflweb.org/article-on-the-arts-best-music-documentaries-of-2021-and-some-disappointments/ By Noah Schaffer This list consists of recent music documentaries that I have released over the past year – a few hiccups as well as the most notable. Local theaters may have reopened this year, but I only saw one movie in person (and it wasn’t a documentary). Again, this list consists of recent musical […]]]>

By Noah Schaffer

This list consists of recent music documentaries that I have released over the past year – a few hiccups as well as the most notable.

Local theaters may have reopened this year, but I only saw one movie in person (and it wasn’t a documentary). Again, this list consists of recent musical material that I have streamed throughout the year. Independently produced and distributed films often spend well over a year on the festival circuit, so some of them may have official studio release dates of 2020, while others have debuted at. festival at the end of this year and will likely not be readily available in all markets for some time to come. If a specific movie looks interesting but is not currently available, it’s worth visiting the movie’s website to see if the movie has a mailing list or social media feed that lists streaming and viewing opportunities. in person to come.

The best:

A scene from The kings of rumba.

The kings of rumba – Africa and the Caribbean have had a musical conversation for decades. One of the most glorious results of the confab: the sound of the Congolese rumba which developed when musicians living under Belgian colonial rule took over Afro-Cuban rhythms. Grand Kallé, Dr Nico and the famous prolific Franco are among those who were part of the heyday of Congolese rumba. They are presented with a surprising amount of high-quality footage and interviews from the surviving musicians of the time. While documentary makers on little-known genres often feel the need to be included in the mix, Kings of Rumba filmmaker Alan Brain cleverly withdraws from the film and simply lets the Congolese tell their own story of the enduring music they made under brutal colonial oppression.

A scene from Poly styrene: I’m a cliché.

Poly styrene: I’m a clichéThe explosion of punk rock in the late 1970s was perhaps only after the emergence of The Beatles and Dylan in the 1960s as the most documented era in pop music history. So, there is a high bar for any filmmaker trying to find a new angle. But there are nooks and crannies of that story that are still worth exploring, as evidenced by the story of Poly Styrene, a biracial teenager whose band X-Ray Spex turned heads in a musical world largely dominated by white men. The X-Ray Spex didn’t last very long, and struggling mentally, Styrene avoided the limelight until a well-received comeback shortly before her death in 2011. Like many music documentaries, the the subject’s offspring played a role in its achievement. Memories aren’t always easy, but they are revealed in an empathetic way, which makes for a captivating film regardless of music interest. [The movie is slated to screen at the Brattle in early February and on Showtime in June.] Artistic fuse review

Summer of the soulQuestlove is perhaps the most ubiquitous presence as a talking head in music docs – for example, he appears in recent films about Doc Severinsen and Herb Albert, both of which were endearing but too numerous to make this list. What he does with the astonishing footage from the 1969 Harlem Culture Festival gives hope that he’ll spend more time on the other side of the camera – and songs like Sly and the Family Stone and the 5th Dimension that don’t. have not done it in this film will one day see the light of day. Instead of relying on critics or younger artists, Questlove found audience members – a group often overlooked in art documentaries – and gave them the opportunity to talk about the impact and inspiration of the film. festival. Even though the story of how the images were discovered didn’t really match the marketing of the movie, Summer of the soul earned its hype as one of the most essential musical documentaries of all time. Artistic fuse review

Fanny: The right to rock – If there is one group ahead of its time, it is Fanny. The hard rockers of the early ’70s weren’t just an all-girl group that toured extensively years before the Runaways or Go-Gos, the group included queer and Asian-American members. There’s plenty of pristine footage from the band in their prime, as well as flawless interviews with most of the members, including West Massachusetts-based June Millington. The film does not always put the group in context and it does not understand why the rediscovery of the group was so late. (Like Ann Powers done in this essay.) But the film still offers an excellent introduction.

No ordinary man – Billy Tipton is certainly not known for his jazz career, which consisted of companion work and a pair of nice but mundane cocktail piano records from the mid-1950s. But his death in 1989 made headlines. newspapers when it was discovered that he was apparently born to a woman, unbeknownst to his longtime wife or adopted children. Snippets of how Tipton’s story was covered at the time underscore how sensationalized transgender issues were. But in the years that followed, Tipton grew into something of a weird icon – a The west coast jazz band named after Tipton have released 14 albums. Billy Tipton Jr. is interviewed about his father’s legacy, but much of this refreshing, unconventional film consists of young gay actors reading a script about Tipton’s life and discussing what they take away from his story. .

Harmonies of lampposts – The sounds of doo-wop group harmony played a major role in the development of early rock, but are often overlooked when pop history is told. This well-crafted documentary goes a long way to remedy that. Considering the advanced age of the artists interviewed, the filmmakers made the film just in time. The story, from its gospel roots to its impact on Motown and beyond, is perfectly told.

A scene from Listening to Kenny G.

Listen to Kenny G – The smooth jazz soprano saxophone star has long been an easy punching bag to criticize, making it an excellent documentary subject. The information about the man here isn’t particularly revealing – he’s even richer than we thought, thanks to the fact that he was an early Starbucks investor, and he really enjoys winning. Where the film shines is how it balances the perspective of jazz critics like Ben Ratliff and Will Layman with the appreciation Kenny G listeners have for the role his songs have played in their lives. (Not explicitly stated, but clearly obvious, is how smooth jazz has long attracted a large, black, middle-class audience.) No Coltrane lover is likely to come away with a new desire to hear more music. of Kenny, but those prone to musical snobbery would be wise to consider the film’s points on what makes music good or bad. Artistic fuse review

Bitchin ‘: The Sound and Fury of Rick James – Rick James passed away as a sort of Dave Chappelle punchline. This film gives him his credit as a significant pioneer of funk and pop without ignoring the demons that led to his long cocaine addiction and multiple stints in prison for offenses including the horrific kidnapping and abuse of women. Casual fans may be particularly surprised by the story of James’ early years in Canada playing with Neil Young. Ultimately, the film does more than make a case for James as a key transitional figure, even if it shows just how another artist he was whose own life rarely had the kind of happiness his music brought. to others.

Disappointments:

Brian Wilson: long road promised – Almost everything that should be avoided in a musical documentary is on display here. The creative genius behind the Beach Boys has been the subject of seemingly endless film and book projects before. The main excuse for making the film seems to be that the infamous Wilson was interviewed for 70 hours – all on car rides or having lunch with a friend. Rolling stone journalist. But apparently so little interest came from these discussions that the film had to be stuffed with snippets from old Wilson interviews and, worst of all, celebrity talking heads like a Jonas Brother and a guy from the Foo Fighters who is transported when Dave Grohl is not available. A scene where Wilson is filmed sitting in silence during a recent studio session while his abusive father’s audio is played seems particularly exploitative.

Mr. Saturday night – Robert Stigwood was one of the most successful film and music impresarios of the 1970s thanks to Saturday night fever, Fat, and the RSO label. But by the mid-1980s he had cashed and his label was gone, with Stigwood spending the rest of his life dodging taxes on a yacht in the Caribbean. The film eschews talking heads for audio interviews and old footage – conveniently masking the number of those interviews that are picked up from other sources. In the end, Stigwood turns out to be too much of a conundrum for the filmmakers; it’s basically a portrait of a guy who really succeeded until he wasn’t. The coverage of the end of the reign is particularly unsatisfactory; for example, a lawsuit filed by its golden geese, the Bee Gees, is being ignored. The story of Nick Cohn, the journalist whose New York magazine article leads to film Saturday night fever turns out to be more interesting than anything about Stigwood himself.


Over the past 15 years Noah schaffer has written about otherwise unrecognized musicians from the worlds of gospel, jazz, blues, Latin, Africa, reggae, Middle Eastern music, klezmer, polka and far beyond. He has won over 10 awards from the New England Newspaper and Press Association.


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DPP and LDP agree to strengthen their collaboration https://cflweb.org/dpp-and-ldp-agree-to-strengthen-their-collaboration/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 16:00:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/dpp-and-ldp-agree-to-strengthen-their-collaboration/ FRUITS AND FRIES: The two sides agreed to collaborate on the chip supply chain, which would be a strategic effort to strengthen national security, a DPP lawmaker said. By Jason Pan / Journalist An agreement to strengthen collaboration in the semiconductor manufacturing industry was reached yesterday as the ruling parties of Taiwan and Japan held […]]]>

FRUITS AND FRIES:
The two sides agreed to collaborate on the chip supply chain, which would be a strategic effort to strengthen national security, a DPP lawmaker said.

  • By Jason Pan / Journalist

An agreement to strengthen collaboration in the semiconductor manufacturing industry was reached yesterday as the ruling parties of Taiwan and Japan held a second “two plus two” videoconference, during which Japan held a second “two plus two” videoconference. reaffirmed its support for Taiwan’s candidacy to join the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP).

The meeting focused on foreign affairs and economic policies, with MPs from the Progressive Democratic Party (DPP) Lo Chih-cheng (羅致政) and Chiu Chih-wei (邱志偉) taking part in Taipei, while the Liberal Party- Democrat (LDP) of Japan was represented by Head of Foreign Affairs Division Masahisa Sato and Head of Economics, Trade and Industry Division Akimasa Ishikawa.

At the start of the meeting, Sato held a sugar apple from Taiwan to express his strong support for the country’s agricultural products, Lo said, adding that at an event in Japan last week, Ishikawa held an orange from Taiwan. for the same reason.

Photo: Chien Hui-ju, Taipei Times

Taiwan is playing a leading role in advanced and mature processing technologies for chip production, while “the semiconductor industry has become a silicon shield protecting our nation,” Chiu said at a conference release after the meeting.

“It is also a priority concern for Japan, as IC chip shortages and supply chain disruptions have affected Japan’s economic development,” he said, adding that the two sides had agreed. bilateral collaboration on the chip supply chain, which would constitute a strategic effort to strengthen national security.

“Taiwan and Japan have a very close relationship in terms of history and good mutual friendship between our peoples, he said. “The two countries also have close ties in business and commerce, regional geopolitical security, and regional economic development.”

The two sides agreed that collaboration in the semiconductor industry and its supply chain management would help build a more comprehensive framework and strengthen cooperation, Chiu said.

Quoting Sato, he said the Japanese Diet has passed legislation for 5G mobile network technology and is expected to introduce new legislation soon to strengthen the Japanese semiconductor industry.

Lo said there had been enthusiastic discussions on bilateral cooperation on foreign affairs initiatives and economic policies.

“The talks focused on the issue of Taiwan’s application for membership in the CPTPP,” Lo said. Congressman Sato made special mention that before the general election in Japan in October, the PLD had in its party platform that it would welcome Taiwan to join the trade bloc, but no mention of the intention of China to accede to it. “

“It is clear that the PLD has a policy of supporting and welcoming Taiwan to join the CPTPP … although we also discussed the challenges that need to be overcome for this decision,” he said, adding that ” the two sides have agreed not to reveal details regarding this matter to outsiders.

Yesterday’s meeting was the second virtual “two plus two” dialogue between the DPP and the LDP after a meeting in August, during which they discussed military and national defense issues.

Comments will be moderated. Keep comments relevant to the article. Comments containing abusive and obscene language, personal attacks of any kind or promotion will be removed and the user banned. The final decision will be at the discretion of the Taipei Times.


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Rebecca Juro, trans activist and journalist, dies at 59 https://cflweb.org/rebecca-juro-trans-activist-and-journalist-dies-at-59/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 20:59:25 +0000 https://cflweb.org/rebecca-juro-trans-activist-and-journalist-dies-at-59/ Voices from LGBTQ media and other community leaders reacted with shock and dismay to news of the death of Rebecca Juro, an uncompromising transgender activist, print journalist and internet radio host, on December 17. Juro, who was 59, died of lung cancer following a recurrence of the disease. Born in New York, she spent her […]]]>

Voices from LGBTQ media and other community leaders reacted with shock and dismay to news of the death of Rebecca Juro, an uncompromising transgender activist, print journalist and internet radio host, on December 17.

Juro, who was 59, died of lung cancer following a recurrence of the disease. Born in New York, she spent her youth living alternately with her mother in New Jersey and her father in Manhattan, and lived in both places as an adult. Since 2016, she lived in Philadelphia.

Juro became a trans woman in 1997 at the age of 35, and over the decades since, has become one of the most recognizable voices in LGBTQ media. Media she contributed to included Gay City News, The Advocate, MSNBC.com, The Huffington Post, South Florida Gay News, Windy City Times, The Bilerico Project, and LGBTQ Nation.

In 2006, Juro started “The Rebecca Juro Show, an internet radio show that was an early example of how the web and later podcasting would help diversify voices from mainstream media.

Reacting to the news of Juro’s death, Bil Browning, his editor at Bilerico and LGBTQ Nation, wrote on Facebook: “The world has lost a warrior today. I find myself without words big enough to say about the woman who refused to shut up.

Browning went on to echo a phrase Juro has used over and over again to characterize his work: “While your voice may not be heard anymore, Rebecca Juro, thanks in part to your inspiration and determination, the T is not silent. “

Rebecca Juro holding a sign with her trademark mantra.FACEBOOK / REBECCA JURO

Juro’s death was announced on Facebook by his brother Steve Juro, who wrote: “Sad news… my sister Rebecca Juro passed away last night. She has lived a difficult and multifaceted life that has taken her down a number of different paths. She was a writer, an ardent defender of trans issues, a companion of my mother, a punk rocker (groupie Joan Jett, see photo), and many other things…. She would always fight for what she believed. She was battling lung cancer, thought she was beating him, but it took it. She will be missed and always remembered.

Dawn Ennis, a transgender journalist who was Juro’s pair and friend, wrote simply, “Heartbroken… No words.

Diego Miguel Sanchez, a trans man who leads advocacy, policy and partnerships at PFLAG and previously was senior policy adviser to Congressman Barney Frank, wrote on Facebook: “Becky, stay in power and thank you for being a great sister, leader, friend, and fierce fighter in all the fields that matter. We miss you and your legacy lives on.

Cathy Renna, communications director of the National LGBTQ Task Force, told Gay City News: “She was a great journalist and as a trans journalist she was a trailblazer. Rebecca was never afraid of anyone or anything and asked the tough questions to hold us all accountable. I received her questions several times, but I respected her more after an interview. She also educated so many of us about the trans community in a shameless way that wasn’t as common as it is today. It’s a loss for our community and the LGBTQ media.

In an article on LGBTQ Nation In January this year, Juro, noting that this is the first time Democrats have controlled the presidency and both houses of Congress since 2010, wrote of the urgency to protect the rights of trans-Americans and to reverse the tide of ‘attacks, both physical and political, on their safety and dignity.

“At the age of 58, I reached the point in my life when the transgender friends and allies that I have fought with and worked with are starting to die,” she wrote. “Whenever this happens, I remind myself of the truth that I have less time in front of me than behind me. If it is the same with our heads of government, I wish I could enjoy the same civil rights and equal treatment under the law in my country as cisgender Americans before I die, no matter how many people there are. ‘years that I have left.

There is no guarantee, Juro reminded his readers, that Democrats have more than two years before the midterms of 2022 to make changes at the federal level.

In a 2016 interview with Dese’Rae L. Stage for livethroughthis.org, Juro recalled the attraction she found in punk music and drugs as a teenager living with her father on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. When she was 18, she left her father’s apartment to move into an ORS where she paid $ 90 in rent per week.

During this time, she said, she didn’t feel safe saying the words “I’m a girl. There was nothing else, no social acceptance, no internet, none of that.

She continued, “I felt like the way to deal with this was to fix myself, to masculinize myself.”

Rebecca Juro with rocker Joan Jett.FACEBOOK / STEVE JURO

As a young adult, Juro said: “I discovered Joan Jett. Joan Jett was a big deal for me, because I was still grappling with the transgender issue. Although, of course, I didn’t know how to call him transgender at the time.

At the end of 2014, Juro, writing shortly after the death of Leslie Feinberg, explained in Avocado how Feinberg’s 1996 book “Transgender Warriors” “Saved My Life”.

Just months after Feinberg’s book came out, Juro, who “had no idea how to start living the life I wanted”, attempted to kill himself by rolling over the side of a bridge. Realizing that she didn’t really want to die, Juro ran away at the last minute and was in a Barnes & Noble a few hours later, where she ran into “Transgender Warriors”.

Reading this book led to an email correspondence with Feinberg, who encouraged Juro to reach out to the transgender community and continue writing. Within months, “Becky’s List,” a regular e-mail outlet featuring Juro’s writings on transgender life and politics, was born.

“When I tell people today that reading ‘Transgender Warriors’ saved my life, many seem to think I am speaking metaphorically, but I am not,” Juro wrote in The Advocate. “If I hadn’t discovered this book when I made it, I don’t know how long I could have gone on without hope, without understanding that who and what I am matters and deserves to be honored and respected . “


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Sorry, Prime Minister. The party is over https://cflweb.org/sorry-prime-minister-the-party-is-over/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/sorry-prime-minister-the-party-is-over/ Whenever I read about the seemingly continuous stages of bacchanal festivities in Downing Street over the past 18 months, one question comes first to my mind. Who exactly is responsible for finding the excuses for Downing Street? Because whoever they are, the poor are struggling. If I were Boris Johnson, I would make the appointment […]]]>

Whenever I read about the seemingly continuous stages of bacchanal festivities in Downing Street over the past 18 months, one question comes first to my mind. Who exactly is responsible for finding the excuses for Downing Street? Because whoever they are, the poor are struggling. If I were Boris Johnson, I would make the appointment of a first-class apology writer my top priority.

Yesterday’s apologies were the weakest yet. A newspaper had published a photo leak of the Prime Minister and a large number of employees having drinks in the Downing Street Garden in May 2020, during the first and strictest lockdown.

How were they going to get out of this one? They couldn’t very well tell that it was a social event, because at the time all social events were banned by the government, even those organized outside. But surely they couldn’t call it a staff meeting, as so many people in the photo were drinking wine and the then Prime Minister’s fiancee – who is not a staff member – was in attendance.

In any case, no one seems to have found a satisfactory alternative. Because when Dominic Raab, the Secretary of Justice, was taken to the airwaves yesterday to defend what happened, he slammed and waded like a fish on a dock.

Gamely attempted to make the case that the event “was not a social occasion, it was the staff having a drink after the meetings”, which was obviously very different. Either way, he said, everything was flawless as Downing Street Garden “is a place of work” and the participants were “all in costume or mostly in work clothes”. As for the then Prime Minister’s fiancée, she had only “intervened” – and anyway, it was “a little bit charitable” for anyone to complain, because they had had “a good day. fulfilled .

In summary then: the event was legitimate because it was held in a workplace, even if it might look like a garden to the uninformed eye, and everyone was dressed for work, even if they were drinking. wine and munching on cheese and not doing just about any job.

I’m sure Mr. Raab was doing his best with the material he was given. I hope he will understand, however, if the public remains somewhat perplexed. Because whatever garden event took place precisely two days after a Downing Street press conference in which a member of the public, speaking by video call, asked the Prime Minister if he was okay to meet people from other households like while you were outside. And the Prime Minister replied no. At most, he said, you could exercise in the park with someone from another household. Just one. That was it. Anything more would be dangerous and against the rules.

There may have been a deviation from these rules that the Prime Minister forgot to mention. Something like, “You can exercise outdoors with people from as many different households as you want – provided that while exercising you drink wine, munch on cheese, and mainly wear clothes.” work clothes. The presence of drinks, snacks and costumes will ensure that the virus cannot spread. “

If such an exemption did not exist, however, I fear we would have to consider another explanation. That is, as of May 2020, the country’s rulers all knew it was perfectly safe to socialize outdoors with people from different households. Yet, they banned the rest of us from doing it anyway, while continuing to do it on our own.

Yet, whatever the truth, good luck to everyone in Downing Street in their efforts to explain the next round of allegations, whenever they arise.

“Contrary to what this highly misleading photograph may appear to show, the Cabinet was not doing the conga. In fact, as part of this government’s commitment to promote first aid training, each minister was practicing the Heimlich maneuver on the minister in front… ”


pot harry

The organizers of real quidditch contests are considering changing the name of the sport, in order to “distance themselves” from JK Rowling after his comments on trans issues. For my part, I find this news deeply disturbing.

Until now, I just had no idea that there were adults who chose to spend their free time running around a field with brooms between their legs, pretending to be flying wizards. Yet, it seems that these people really do exist. The revelation deeply moved me.

Then again, the more time JK Rowling’s enemies spend running around a field with brooms between their legs while pretending to be flying wizards, the less time they’ll have to spend fuming on social media. So maybe we shouldn’t discourage them.


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Former Guardian Editor-in-Chief Alan Rusbridger reflects on controversial topics https://cflweb.org/former-guardian-editor-in-chief-alan-rusbridger-reflects-on-controversial-topics/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 16:58:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/former-guardian-editor-in-chief-alan-rusbridger-reflects-on-controversial-topics/ When the old Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger left the media to become principal of an Oxford college, it seemed he was looking for a quieter life. After overseeing stories such as the Wikileaks release of secret documents, the phone hacking scandal and the Edward Snowden surveillance saga, he had upset the White House, embarrassed Downing […]]]>

When the old Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger left the media to become principal of an Oxford college, it seemed he was looking for a quieter life.

After overseeing stories such as the Wikileaks release of secret documents, the phone hacking scandal and the Edward Snowden surveillance saga, he had upset the White House, embarrassed Downing Street, and made enemies in his own. industry as well as many admirers.

But after six years in academia, he’s back and poking his nose into some of modern life’s most angry hornet nests. “I enjoyed my time in Oxford, but I’m a journalist at heart, he recalls, sitting in a high-ceilinged front room of the Grade II listed Westminster Townhouse which is his new home. .

In his first issue as editor-in-chief of the monthly current affairs magazine Perspective, Rusbridger launches head-on in the cancellation of culture and trans rights, two subjects fomenting the cultural wars which polarize so many contemporary debates.

Her first cover story, “How To Cancel Culture Became A Blood Sport,” features dozens of cases of people losing their jobs or not having a platform because of events due to negative perceptions of their opinions. Another article, “Gender Wars,” is a seven-page exploration of an inflammatory theme: the intersection of trans and women‘s rights. “I put on my tin helmet,” he says, although he has had “nothing but good feedback” on a dignified exchange in which feminist philosopher Kathleen Stock and transgender lawyer Robin White respond. to the same questions.

Rusbridger isn’t looking for fights. While other publications see culture wars as a means of amplification, Prospect will be a “voice of calm,” he says. “I feel exhausted by the culture wars. Much of it is being conducted at such a high volume and in such black and white terms and that is not how I see the world. It is often an attempt to silence, denigrate, or overturn arguments with which you disagree. I don’t find that very interesting.

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As a publisher he is drawn to tough issues because “I don’t like the feeling that things can’t be discussed.” He has no fixed position on gender wars. “I don’t feel strong on one side or the other and the only time I tweeted about it was to this effect and I was freaking out on both sides.” Reading the views from each side, Perspective readers “would have changed their minds to some extent” because the two positions are rarely juxtaposed.

Rusbridger, 67, edited the left-wing magazine Guardian for two decades but wants Perspective occupy different ground. “My feeling is that if, roughly, The spectator is law and the [New] statesman is left, Perspective doesn’t need to be either. I would like it to be a place where people without a strong affiliation can meet in a respectful dialogue.

He was hired by Perspective, Clive Cowdery, who made his fortune in insurance. Cowdery, Chairman of Resolution Life Group, attended a Bristol conference and the magazine is part of Resolution Trust, a non-profit organization promoting an equal distribution of wealth and power in society.

AT The Guardian Rusbridger enlarged the newsroom with such enthusiasm that critics accused him of debauchery. Now he has to operate with a staff of eight. His success will be determined by his ability to command original writers, such as the former French ambassador Gérard Errera, who gives a Gallic point of view on the rupture of the Entente Cordiale.

For PerspectiveIn the Lives section, he hired former England cricket captain Michael Brearley (to write on the sport) and actor Sheila Hancock (on “long life”). Other regulars include Doncaster-based asylum seeker Jason Thomas-Fournillier, Cambridgeshire priest Alice Goodman and East Anglian farmer Tom Martin. “I didn’t want it to be an elite metropolitan magazine,” says the editor.

His stylistic inspirations include the end Spectator editor-in-chief Alexander Chancellor, former Sunday opening hours columnist Anthony Holden and New York magazine. He hopes to emulate the narrative writing style of American periodicals such as Atlantic.

Rusbridger’s time away from the media has coincided with an increase in misinformation online. “Then you have this catastrophic government with a prime minister who is lying on purpose. It’s a total implosion of confidence, ”he says.

He wants to start organizing events from a 90-seat auditorium in the basement of the building. It’s “a seven-minute walk from parliament,” he said, before heading to tap a Prospect podcast with Irish writer Fintan O’Toole on the culture of cancellation.

For all the ambition of Rusbridger, Perspective will not emulate the breathtaking Fleet Street headlines that seek to influence politics through thunderous editorials. “It’s a huge relief for me not to have to think, ‘What is the magazine thinking?’ The magazine does not think! We’ve put together an eclectic range of interesting voices, ”he says. “It sounds very liberating.”


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Lithuania, main Baltic ally of the United States, stands firm with Taiwan https://cflweb.org/lithuania-main-baltic-ally-of-the-united-states-stands-firm-with-taiwan/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 23:02:36 +0000 https://cflweb.org/lithuania-main-baltic-ally-of-the-united-states-stands-firm-with-taiwan/ During his visit to Washington at the end of November, the Lithuanian Foreign Minister Gabrielius Landsbergis underline that “Lithuania’s biggest lesson is that economic coercion does not necessarily mean that the country has to move away from independent foreign policy decisions”. “You will probably be threatened. You will be yelled at in the Chinese media […]]]>

During his visit to Washington at the end of November, the Lithuanian Foreign Minister Gabrielius Landsbergis underline that “Lithuania’s biggest lesson is that economic coercion does not necessarily mean that the country has to move away from independent foreign policy decisions”.

“You will probably be threatened. You will be yelled at in the Chinese media headlines, but nonetheless, you can resist it, ”he added. “I must say that the only weakness of democracies is that they cannot help each other.”

Indeed, Lithuania has charted a new, revised course in terms of its relationship with China. Few nations have dared challenge china just like Lithuania, one of the smallest countries in the European Union, but which exceeds its weight.

In May, Lithuania abandoned the so-called “17 + 1” platform, a ten-year-old Beijing initiative through which China has sought to exert diplomatic and economic influence over the countries of central and eastern Europe.

Landsbergis was clear that “there is no more ’17 +1 ‘, because for practical purposes Lithuania is absent,” urging other EU countries to follow suit.

It should also be noted that in September, after an investigation by the Lithuanian government revealed personal data security risks, the Baltic country advised its citizens to throw away their Chinese smartphones as soon as possible.

More recently, going one step further than the United States, Lithuania allowed Taiwan to open a de facto embassy in its capital, Vilnius, under the official name of the Taiwanese Representative Office.

It is perhaps not all that surprising that these concrete actions by Lithuania angered Beijing in a fairly measurable way, leading China to downgrade its diplomatic and economic relations with the country, one of the main allies of the United States in the the Baltic States.

Lithuania is firmly committed to the values ​​of free market democracy, and it is imperative for Washington to show the strongest possible support for its Baltic ally.

The Baltic nation has been an important partner of the United States, an effective defender of political freedom, a strong supporter of NATO and a committed investor in defense capabilities.

Economically, although uncertainty persists, the Lithuanian economy has benefited from its high degree of resilience accumulated over the past 25 years.

According to the Heritage Foundation’s annual Economic Freedom Index, which compares entrepreneurial executives from countries around the world, Lithuania’s economic freedom score has increased significantly over time and is now well above regional averages and global.

Lithuania’s ongoing transition from a former Soviet satellite state to a more dynamic and market-oriented economy has been facilitated by openness to foreign trade and effective trade regulations that foster entrepreneurial dynamism. It should also be noted that Lithuania is a partner of the United States as part of the Three Seas Initiative, which was launched in 2016 to facilitate increased development and connectivity between 12 European Union countries around and between the Baltic, Black and Adriatic Seas.

From a broader geopolitical perspective, known opponents of free market democracies, such as China and Russia, will seek to separate the United States from its like-minded allies and sow division through disinformation, and exacerbate uncertainty.

They should not be allowed to do this.

History reminds us that allies and partners are essential to defeating enemies and winning any world battle. In fact, the value of democratic alliances must be most evident and welcome in an age of increasing testing, especially as US policymakers and other like-minded partners around the world focus on the challenges. China pose more than ever.

The coming months are the time for Washington and its transatlantic partners like Lithuania to remain strong and unwavering and prepare for a new era of cooperation facing challenges.

This piece originally appeared in The daily signal


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Thailand: transgender people denied equal rights https://cflweb.org/thailand-transgender-people-denied-equal-rights/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 04:26:07 +0000 https://cflweb.org/thailand-transgender-people-denied-equal-rights/ (Bangkok) – Transgender people in Thailand have no path to legal recognition of their gender identity, which leaves them vulnerable to various forms of discrimination, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today with Thai Transgender Alliance. The 60-page report, “People Can’t Fit Boxes: Thailand’s Need for Legal Gender Recognition,” found that the lack […]]]>

(Bangkok) – Transgender people in Thailand have no path to legal recognition of their gender identity, which leaves them vulnerable to various forms of discrimination, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today with Thai Transgender Alliance.

The 60-page report, “People Can’t Fit Boxes: Thailand’s Need for Legal Gender Recognition,” found that the lack of legal gender recognition, coupled with insufficient legal protections and widespread social stigma, limits transgender people’s access to life-saving services and exposes them to daily humiliation. Thailand has a reputation as an international hub for gender-affirming surgery and healthcare for transgender people. But this global reputation obscures Thailand’s very limited legal mechanisms to protect transgender people at home.

“Transgender people in Thailand face constant harassment and discrimination, and are often excluded from education and employment,” said Kyle Knight, senior researcher on LGBT rights at Human Rights Watch and co- author of the report. “The Thai government must step in and make legal gender recognition a reality in Thailand. “

Human Rights Watch conducted the research for this report between January and May 2020 with individuals in four locations in Thailand: Bangkok, Trang, Chiang Mai, and Ubon. The researchers conducted in-depth interviews with 62 transgender people, as well as interviews with social workers, academics, and employees of advocacy and service delivery organizations.

Thailand has limited legal provisions that provide some security for transgender people, but they fall far short of comprehensive protections, Human Rights Watch found. In 2007, the Thai legislature passed the People’s Names Act, which allows transgender people to apply to change their names. The law, however, did not give people the ability to ask to change their legal sex. Name change requests are approved at the discretion of the individual directors.

Under the 2015 Gender Equality Act, which prohibits discrimination against people on the basis of their gender expression, the legislature has attempted to address certain forms of discrimination suffered by people. transgender. Yet the government has failed to adequately enforce the law. The Committee on the Determination of Gender-Based Discrimination, which has the power to enforce the law, heard 27 cases of alleged discrimination against transgender people between 2016 and 2019. It took more than three months to complete. adjudicate on many of these cases, and none of the eight parties found responsible received any punishment.

The lack of legal gender recognition in Thailand means that all transgender people carry documents with a different gender of their identity and expression. When transgender people are asked for this material, they may feel humiliated. In some cases, transgender people have reported that government employees harassed them because of the mismatch.

A 27-year-old transgender man in Bangkok described his humiliation when he tried to replace a lost ID: “Officials asked me how I got my penis… and if it was really possible to become a trans man. Officials proceeded to compare him with his past photos. “I felt like a caricature to these government officials,” he said.

Many schools have gender-specific dress codes or facilities and do not allow students to attend school if they dress in a way deemed incompatible with their legal sex, thus violating their right to education. . Rigid enforcement of gender-specific regulations, including uniforms and separate facilities for sex, exacerbates bullying of transgender students by their classmates and teachers.

“When I started wearing makeup and lipstick at school my teacher was scolding me – call me”to choke‘ [a derogatory Thai term, roughly translated as ‘faggot’]said a 25-year-old transgender woman who grew up in Ang Thong province in central Thailand. She believed they distinguished her because she also started to have long hair. “I was also beaten at school by teachers, and teachers would ask my classmates to tease me,” she said.

Transgender people also face barriers in accessing appropriate health care. A 30-year-old transgender woman said that at the age of 20 she was hospitalized with appendicitis and needed urgent surgery. “I was placed in the men’s quarter,” she said. “All bad things like this happen to me because of one word on my document – my gender marker.”

Many transgender people interviewed said discrimination in medical facilities had discouraged them from seeking care, threatening their mental and physical well-being.

The lack of legal gender recognition also hampers the ability of transgender people to secure employment, often resulting in automatic rejection. Some employers have said transgender people would only be hired if they dress according to their sex assigned at birth, not their gender identity. Other employers have explicitly stated in job applications that transgender applicants will not be considered. Many respondents said they felt limited to niche jobs, such as the beauty industry or sex work.

In recent years, the Thai government has started to engage with civil society organizations and United Nations agencies to develop a legal process for gender recognition. The process has stalled and requires urgent attention, Human Rights Watch said.

The Thai government has an important opportunity to match its positive global reputation on LGBT issues with its obligations under international human rights law by developing a rights-based procedure for legal gender recognition. This law should allow transgender people to be recognized on the basis of their gender identity and to change their legal name and gender without any medical requirement.

“Securing the rights of transgender people to non-discrimination, education, health care and employment is central to any vision of equality,” said Knight. “While legal gender recognition does not reduce all of the hardships transgender people in Thailand face, it is a crucial step towards equality and non-discrimination. “


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