Trans Issues – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 14:52:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cflweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Trans Issues – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ 32 32 Xavier Musk: Elon Musk’s child tells court she no longer wants to ‘be tied’ to her father https://cflweb.org/xavier-musk-elon-musks-child-tells-court-she-no-longer-wants-to-be-tied-to-her-father/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 14:52:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/xavier-musk-elon-musks-child-tells-court-she-no-longer-wants-to-be-tied-to-her-father/ The petition was filed by Xavier Alexander Musk, who turned 18 earlier this year and filed the case in Los Angeles County Court shortly after. She asks that her name be changed to Vivian Jenna Wilson. Wilson is the surname of his mother, Justine Wilson, Musk’s ex-wife and mother of five of his seven children. […]]]>

The petition was filed by Xavier Alexander Musk, who turned 18 earlier this year and filed the case in Los Angeles County Court shortly after. She asks that her name be changed to Vivian Jenna Wilson. Wilson is the surname of his mother, Justine Wilson, Musk’s ex-wife and mother of five of his seven children.

Musk, the CEO of You’re here (TSLA) and SpaceX, is the richest person in the world with a estimated net worth of $214 billion.

He has been criticized for some of his statements on Twitter regarding gender identity issues. For example in December 2020, he posted a since-deleted tweet that read “when you put it in your bio” next to a drawing of an 18th century soldier rubbing blood on his face in front of a pile of corpses and wearing a hat that read “I like to oppress.”

In response to critical to this tweet, Musk wrote on Twitter: “I absolutely support trans, but all these pronouns are an aesthetic nightmare.” He also pointed out that Tesla earned a 100% rating from the Human Rights Campaign as one of the “Best Workplaces for LGBTQ+ Equality.” Tesla still has that 100% score in the 2022 HRC ranking.
Musk also said on Twitter that he was leaning towards support Florida Governor Ron DeSantis in the 2024 presidential election. DeSantis recently pushed for and signed legislation, known to critics as the Don’t Say Gay Act, to limit discussion of homosexuality and trans issues in public schools across the country. ‘State.
News of Xavier Musk’s case broke over the weekend on social media and in articles on the celebrity news site the explosion as well as in the Los Angeles Times Monday. There’s a hearing in the case scheduled for this Friday.
Early Sunday, Musk tweeted Father’s Day greetings, followed by another Tweeter who said “I love all my children so much.”

CNN Business was unable to reach Xavier Musk for comment and there were no comments from him in other reports on the filing.

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Message from Democrats: Iowans’ rights are in line with Republican control https://cflweb.org/message-from-democrats-iowans-rights-are-in-line-with-republican-control/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 20:39:24 +0000 https://cflweb.org/message-from-democrats-iowans-rights-are-in-line-with-republican-control/ Just days after the Iowa Supreme Court ruled on abortion rights in Iowa, Democrats in the state are sending out the message that other rights could be at risk. The Iowa Supreme Court released a monumental decision on Friday in which the court found there was no state constitutional right to abortion. The ruling, which […]]]>

Just days after the Iowa Supreme Court ruled on abortion rights in Iowa, Democrats in the state are sending out the message that other rights could be at risk.

The Iowa Supreme Court released a monumental decision on Friday in which the court found there was no state constitutional right to abortion. The ruling, which overturns a 2018 Iowa Supreme Court ruling, opens the state to increased restrictions or a ban on abortion, depending on whether the U.S. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade.

This lawsuit could be a sign of things to come, some Democrats have warned. Marginalized communities — especially the LGBTQ+ community and communities of color — could have their rights taken away in court or by the Republican-controlled Statehouse.

That’s why making the state welcoming to all Iowans is a top campaign goal, gubernatorial candidate Deidre DeJear said at the weekend convention. Statehood of the State’s Democratic Party — and a goal rooted in Iowa’s equality history.

“We can make sure that all of our communities, wherever they come from…no matter what, everyone feels welcome in this state, everyone has a home, everyone has a path to success,” DeJear said. “We can do that in Iowa.”

Restricting access to abortion is a major political goal for Republicans in Iowa — the GOP-controlled state legislature was working on an amendment to the state constitution, reversing the old precedent of the Supreme Court of Iowa that she had a fundamental right to abortion. There haven’t been such significant restrictions on LGBTQ+ rights, but activists say Iowa’s new law banning transgender girls and women from playing on women’s sports teams in schools and colleges is a step towards the restriction of rights.

When the law was passed, Iowa Safe Schools communications director Damian Thompson said he expected to see new laws that harm transgender people.

“As we’ve seen in other states, attacking trans inclusion in sports is the first step,” Thompson said in an email. “Then the goal is to systematically marginalize trans children from other spheres, including but not limited to public accommodation, health care, and education.”

Candidate Ryan Melton, who is running against U.S. Representative Randy Feenstra in Iowa’s 4e District, spoke about the history of progressive values ​​for LGBTQ+ issues at the Democratic state convention. One of his siblings is transgender, Melton said, and his family has been supportive of his brother — and politicians need to extend that same support to LGBTQ+ people through policy.

“There are a lot of people in the community who don’t have siblings or parents to lean on,” he said. “And we can’t completely replace that void. But we can certainly fight for them every day.

Proponents say other state legislation in recent years, such as one that restricted teaching on certain “dividing topics” in classrooms and the “Back the Blue” law that increased penalties for protest-related crimes are hurtful to Iowans of color.

Voting rights restrictions also disproportionately impact Iowans of color, advocates say. Iowa’s voter ID law, along with other recent changes to the state’s election processes, are making it harder to vote, advocates argued.

Democratic candidate for Iowa secretary of state Joel Miller said most Iowans have gotten used to the state’s ID laws, which he supports, but the state still has a long way to go to make voting accessible. He proposed automatically registering Iowans to vote at age 17 when they apply for a driver’s license.

Democratic candidates are bracing for a tough campaign season ahead of the November 8, 2022 election. Most state offices in Iowa are controlled by Republicans, as are both chambers of the Iowa Statehouse . The U.S. Senate seats and three of the four state representative seats are held by Republicans, and election forecasters predict the only Democrat – incumbent Representative Cindy Axne – could be in danger.

To preserve those rights, Democrats have stressed the need to organize ahead of the general election.

“We can’t do it, me and Deidre, we need all your help here,” said Lieutenant Governor candidate Eric Van Lancker, DeJear’s running mate.

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Transgender students and allies speak out against Georgia’s ban on participating in sports https://cflweb.org/transgender-students-and-allies-speak-out-against-georgias-ban-on-participating-in-sports/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 22:09:51 +0000 https://cflweb.org/transgender-students-and-allies-speak-out-against-georgias-ban-on-participating-in-sports/ Transgender students and their allies said Wednesday they will not remain silent in the face of a new state policy they say discriminates against transgender athletes on school teams. “We’re at a point where Republicans are using children as political fodder, and we deserve so much better,” said activist and former Democratic State House candidate […]]]>

Transgender students and their allies said Wednesday they will not remain silent in the face of a new state policy they say discriminates against transgender athletes on school teams.

“We’re at a point where Republicans are using children as political fodder, and we deserve so much better,” said activist and former Democratic State House candidate Bentley Hudgins. “Our trans youth, our queer youth, every child in this state deserves so much better than what we’re being offered right now.”

Last month, the Georgia High School Association, which oversees athletics at 465 schools across the state, changed its rules to require students to play on a team that matches their gender identity.

The rule change came shortly after Governor Brian Kemp signed a bill targeting transgender athletes. Transgender athletes competing in women‘s sports have been a big front in America’s culture wars in recent months. Kemp and many other Republicans say trans women have an unfair advantage over their competitors, but opponents call the legislation a cynical ploy for transphobic voters and point out that there have been no examples of a transgender athlete dominating a sports in Georgia.

“This ban solves a problem that doesn’t exist,” said Peter Isbiter, head of the Metro Atlanta chapter of TransParent, a resource group for parents of transgender children. “There is no groundswell of cisgender children and students seeking to ban their classmates from team sports.

Jennifer Susko, a school counselor who resigned of Cobb County Schools to protest the district’s handling of racial issues, said the new rule contradicts counselors’ professional obligation to treat transgender students in accordance with their gender identity and to ensure that they do not experience discipline, harassment or discrimination because of their gender identity or gender expression.

“The GHSA and Georgia lawmakers are creating exactly the kind of dangerous and discriminatory environment for trans youth that school counselors are charged with preventing,” she said. “When they lack a safe environment and a sense of belonging, transgender youth face a high risk of depression, suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts. In particular, black transgender youth report disproportionate rates of suicide risk, with 59% seriously considering suicide and more than one in four, or 26%, attempting suicide in 2020. There is therefore an urgent need to create spaces safe, inclusive and welcoming, including in sports, for transgender students, with the aim of intervening.

The three were among the speakers Wednesday at a virtual meeting after an in-person rally scheduled for Sunday was canceled following a death threat against one of the organizers.

“The death threat, which included the time, date and location of the rally, was emailed to a young LGBTQ organizer in the Atlanta metro area,” said Isabelle Philip, press director of the Georgia Youth Justice Coalition. “The student is in conversation with officials and experts. As this is a young person and we work more directly with young, trans and queer people, we are not revealing more details at this time.

Saturday Police in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho stopped 31 men equipped with riot shields and a smoke grenade and crammed into a moving truck, apparently on their way to riot during a local LGBTQ Pride Month celebration.

The incident, along with impassioned rhetoric equating teaching children about LGBTQ people to child abuse, has supporters on edge.

Isbiter sought to draw a line between state action and recent threats.

“The actions of Governor Kemp and all members of the GHSA Executive Committee who voted for this ban and the actions of the coward who made these threats over the weekend are a direct threat to the rights of our families and of our children the right not to live in fear,” he said.

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Beyond Decision | Diversity: issues in higher education https://cflweb.org/beyond-decision-diversity-issues-in-higher-education/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 16:52:20 +0000 https://cflweb.org/beyond-decision-diversity-issues-in-higher-education/ Dr. Sara WarnerThe leaked draft of the opinion of the Supreme Court of the United States in Dobbs v. Jackson Women‘s Health Organization not only sparked nationwide alarm and protests among women’s rights activists and scholars, but also jeopardized many hard-won gains for LGBTQ+ rights in several states. A first draft majority opinion written by […]]]>

Dr. Sara WarnerThe leaked draft of the opinion of the Supreme Court of the United States in Dobbs v. Jackson Women‘s Health Organization not only sparked nationwide alarm and protests among women’s rights activists and scholars, but also jeopardized many hard-won gains for LGBTQ+ rights in several states.

A first draft majority opinion written by Judge Samuel Alito and circulated within the court was obtained and published by Policy. An article in Policy explained that if the project becomes final, the decision will overturn the 1973 landmark Roe vs. Wade decision that guaranteed federal constitutional protections of abortion rights and a subsequent 1992 decision, Family planning c. Caseywhich has maintained this right to a large extent.

Dr Sara Warner, director of LGBT studies at Cornell University and associate professor of performing and media arts, said the leaked opinion “whether enacted or amended will fuel the war already underway in this country against LGBTQ+ citizens, and especially trans people of color.

Warner says she is particularly concerned about the trans community of color due to recently passed and proposed laws. “More than 20 anti-trans bills have become law in the past three years, and in the first months of 2022, more than 300 anti-LGBTQ+ bills have been introduced in state legislatures, with more others on the horizon,” Warner said. Various.

Several colleges and universities have released statements from faculty members denouncing the implications of the project and expressing concerns about its impact on LGBTQ+ rights.

One of Warner’s colleagues at Cornell, Dr. Katherine Sender, professor of communication and feminist, gender and sexuality studies, said in a statement posted on the university’s website in May: “I see a direct link between the possible reversal of Roe vs. Wade and the risk of backsliding on LGBTQ civil rights. We already see a parallel conservatism with Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” bill. But the Roe vs. Wade The issue is a bit different because it challenges the right to privacy that also underpins the overturning of anti-sodomy laws, and thus marriage equality.

Sender adds that she views the leaked opinion as the final step in a long-term strategy.

“What we’re seeing is the conservative right wing of the Republican Party playing the long game of bringing reactionary judges into the courts at all levels, now most worryingly the Supreme Court, so the courts are actually far more conservative — anti-women’s rights, anti-LGBTQ rights — than the general population,” Sender said in the statement.

‘Kick in the constitutional legs…’

Columbia Law School released an advisory from its think tank, the Law, Rights and Religion Project, which includes a statement from Dr. Katherine Franke, James L. Dohr Professor of Law.

“While the draft notes that the ruling does not address other issues such as contraception, same-sex marriage and laws criminalizing same-sex relations, Justice Alito’s draft opinion straddles the constitutional legs of rulings recognizing those rights. , and it’s hard to see what constitutional principles they will rely on if that view becomes law,” Franke said in a statement released by Columbia’s Center for Gender and Sexuality Law, where she is director. “If this opinion is officially rendered by the Court, it will eliminate not only the constitutional protections of abortion, but also the well-established legal principles on which fundamental human rights have been based for more than 60 years.

Dr. Godfried AsanteDr. Godfried AsanteWarner notes that the final decision, if left unchanged, could have a twofold impact on LBGTQ+ people. “First, LGBTQ+ people need and deserve access to abortion, just like cisgender and heterosexual people,” Warner says. “Second, this is just the beginning, the tip of the iceberg, in the erosion of our civil liberties and our hard-won legal victories.”

Warner further explains that the leaked SCOTUS notice states that only rights “deeply rooted in the history and tradition of this nation” and “implicit in the concept of ordered liberty” are protected, with the five signatories refusing to define the issue as a right of personal autonomy and control of one’s own body. “That’s what concerns me,” Warner wrote in an email to Various. Alito suggests in his dissent from Obergefell that the right to same-sex marriage is not one of those rights deeply rooted in American history and tradition. “If that’s not a telegraphed threat, I don’t know what is,” Warner remarks.

“Springboard or Slippery Slope”

Dr. Godfried Asante, Assistant Professor of Communication at San Diego State University, researches and publishes on race and LBGTQ+ issues in the United States and Ghana. He says he sees similarities between the two countries, especially around the role of evangelicals in the anti-abortion movement. “Because I study LGBT rights in the United States and in West Africa, I have seen what these evangelical groups are looking for, what kind of national identity, what kind of nation they are looking for,” says Asante. He says measures are being proposed in Ghana to toughen the repressive laws that already exist and to ban discussion of LGBTQ+ issues on social media in schools and other public spaces.

Regarding the Dobbs draft, Asante says, “The reasoning is my greatest concern, and whether that reasoning will be the stepping stone or the slippery slope to the dissolution of other rights.” He adds that in the draft bill, “the way in which [ Alito] wrote that it shouldn’t be applied in other contexts – I don’t believe so, and I don’t believe so because of what’s already happening in states like Idaho, Florida, and Texas. I think it would be extremely naive to assume that the reasoning applied in the project cannot be applied in other contexts.

Asante compares Ghana’s existing and proposed anti-LGBTQ+ laws to those in the US “Looking at what’s happening in Ghana and what’s happening in the US, I see similar tactics,” he says. The effort in Ghana is being used to push for the enactment of even tougher laws that target trans women, just as laws passed in various US states have marginalized trans students and athletes, Asante says.

Bills preventing trans youth, especially girls, from participating in women’s sports continue to be introduced by state legislatures, even though in most of these states the number of trans students seeking to compete is tiny – for example, two out of 180,000 students a year in Michigan, according to the Detroit Free Press. LGBTQ civil rights group The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) filed a federal civil rights lawsuit in June 2021 challenging Florida’s “Fairness in Women’s Sports Act,” which prohibits transgender women and girls from participate in women’s sports. The HRC argues that the law violates both the Constitution and existing federal anti-discrimination law. HRC also sued Tennessee over its legislation restricting restroom use for trans students and challenged the Trump administration’s attempt to end discrimination protections for LGBTQ+ people in the Affordable Care Act.

Pending the Court’s final opinion on Dobbsgiven the onslaught of legislative attacks already on LBGTQ+ rights, researchers are far from optimistic.

“We have regressed into a sphere of political ignorance with naysayers claiming that LGBTQ+ people are moral threats, child molesters, groomers and recruiters,” Warner says. She says the regression is exemplified by Florida Governor Ron DeSantis’ so-called “Don’t Say Gay” bill “and his bullying of Walt Disney.”

Warner adds, “I am a Southerner, from Louisiana, and am enraged and saddened by this and by the Governor of Texas. [Greg] Abbott’s suggestion that parents who provide affirmative health care to their trans offspring are child abusers. This onslaught, led largely by white, male, religious ideologues, is escalating with no end in sight.

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A bipartisan group of Ohio lawmakers is trying to outlaw LGBTQ discrimination https://cflweb.org/a-bipartisan-group-of-ohio-lawmakers-is-trying-to-outlaw-lgbtq-discrimination/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 07:48:25 +0000 https://cflweb.org/a-bipartisan-group-of-ohio-lawmakers-is-trying-to-outlaw-lgbtq-discrimination/ The following article was originally published on News5Cleveland.com and is published in the Ohio Capital Journal under a content sharing agreement. Unlike other OCJ articles, it is not available for free republication by other news outlets because it is owned by WEWS in Cleveland. While the state continually comes up with legislation that LGBTQ+ advocates […]]]>

The following article was originally published on News5Cleveland.com and is published in the Ohio Capital Journal under a content sharing agreement. Unlike other OCJ articles, it is not available for free republication by other news outlets because it is owned by WEWS in Cleveland.

While the state continually comes up with legislation that LGBTQ+ advocates say is discriminatory, a bipartisan group of lawmakers are challenging those bills and trying to push forward the Ohio Fairness Act.

Just a week after Republican lawmakers passed a bill that would require genital inspections for any female high school or college athlete who is “accused” or “suspected” of being transgender, reaction to the bill has brought Ohio and News 5 coverage to the spotlight on cable news networks, late night talk show circuits and national newspapers.

Ohio is one of nearly 30 states without protections against LGBT discrimination, according to data collected by Freedom for all Americans. This means that it is technically legal in most parts of the state to discriminate against someone based on their sexual orientation or gender identity or expression.

“Ohio needs to go in a different direction than we are in right now, said State Sen. Nickie Antonio, a Democrat from Lakewood. “These kinds of bills that are hateful and set us back are not going to be the kinds of policies that make people want to come here, raise a family, put down roots.”

The Northeast Ohio Democrat is the only openly gay lawmaker, and she said now is the time to introduce laws that welcome people into the state.

“Depriving us of the full depth and breadth of protections and equality for no reason other than who we are and who we love is not right,” she added.

The Ohio Fairness Act is not new. It has been presented at every General Assembly for at least 20 years, this time making the 10th attempt – six of the 10 are by Antonio.

There is more support this time.

Senate Bill 119 and his companion House Bill 208 are currently sitting, blocked in committee. The Senate version was presented by Antonio and State Senator Michael Rulli, a Republican from Salem; the House version by state Representatives Michael Skindell, a Democrat from Lakewood, and Brett Hillyer, a Republican from Uhrichsville.

“It offers protections in housing, employment and in the public sphere,” Antonio said.

In a 5-4 decision in June 2015, the United States Supreme Court said that all states must allow same-sex marriages and recognize same-sex marriages, whether they took place inside or outside of the state.

Three years later, SCOTUS sided with a Colorado baker who refused to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple, citing the First Amendment allowing him to refuse the couple, based on their religious beliefs.

“It’s a law for public accommodations, but there’s nothing fair about a bill that will end up discriminating in the name of discrimination against millions of Ohioans and their opinions,” said Linda Harvey, ultra-conservative Mission America activist.

Colorado baker Jack Phillips has been targeted by cancel culture for having his own opinions, she said.

“What happens is: you have to bake the cake, you have to make the flowers for the wedding, you have to take the picture, you have to print the flyer announcing the Drag Queen Storytimeshe added, sharing her thoughts on the LGBTQ+ perspective. “Or we will bully your business, we will publicly shame you.”

“Cancel culture” is when someone is challenged, and sometimes punished, for what is perceived as “problematic” behavior.

“The LGBTQ movement and the Equity Act want to try to position this as something fair,” Harvey said. “It’s totally discriminatory and, in some ways, frankly, fascist.”

Asked by News 5’s Morgan Trau what was fascist about that, she cited the “reframing of language” in the constitution to include gay people in non-discrimination laws.

“[Lawmakers are] give that level of influence to the misbehaving LGBTQ movement,” she added. “They want to redefine the language as it currently exists in Ohio law so that sex discrimination, wherever sex discrimination appears, it will magically mean that there is a defense for homosexual behaviors and gender confusion.”

Freedom of religion was one of Harvey’s most important points.

“You’re asking people to be coerced into violating some of the deepest expressions of sexual morality in our faith,” Harvey said. “Mandatory speech has never been an American value, and I don’t think it’s a value in Ohio, and I don’t think it’s a value that helps businesses. It forces mandatory acceptance of behaviors that people may not approve of.

The law could lead to more lawsuits, she added.

“I don’t have any evidence of that, but it does appear that some of the incidents across the country – the baking of the cakes and all that – were carefully engineered to provoke their excuse for a trial,” the curator said.

She didn’t have statistics to prove that cities in states that have LGBT non-discrimination ordinances have more lawsuits.

Harvey also spoke out in favor of the Save Women‘s Sports Act, which passed the Ohio House by putting the language into an entirely different bill at the last minute.

Antonio couldn’t disagree more.

“All of these bills, I think are dog whistles,” the Democrat said. “It creates a very hateful and bigoted situation.”

The Legislator refers to numerous bills, including but not limited to:

The Save Women’s Sports Act, HB 151/61, which would prohibit transgender girls and women from participating in sports with cisgender girls and women. The bill also requires genital inspections for anyone “suspected” of being trans.

RELATED: Ohio GOP Passes Bill to Root Out ‘Suspected’ Transgender Female Athletes Through Genital Inspection

Save Adolescents From Experimentation (SAFE) Act, HB 454, which would ban gender-affirming care for LGBTQ+ minors. This includes hormone blockers, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), surgery and possibly mental health services.

RELATED: Fact Check on Gender-Affirming Care

Divive Concepts or the “Both Sides” bill, HB 327 and 322, which would prevent schools from teaching on arbitrary “controversial topics”. The bill’s sponsor told News 5 it means the Holocaust will be taught from “both sides,” including from the perspective of “German soldiers.”

RELATED: Rep.’s Holocaust Comments Sponsoring ‘Divisive Concepts’ Bill Raises Concerns

Ohio’s version of Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay, Don’t Say Race” bill, as educators, activists, and Democrats call it because it uses the same language in Divisive Concepts, but explicitly states that it controls and inhibits discussion of sexuality or gender. in schools.

RELATED: Lawmakers Hear Ohio’s Version of Florida’s ‘Don’t Say Gay’ Bill

“Do we want to take Ohio back and into a superstitious, old-fashioned world, demonizing a small group of people who need our care and support, not our hate and bigotry?” asked Anthony. “Or do we mean, let’s be reasonable people.”

When it comes to the transgender athlete bill, Senate Speaker Matt Huffman, a Republican from Lima, seemed to cautiously take the middle ground.

“I would love to have audiences on this and not drag it under the door as everyone walks out and says, ‘Why haven’t you done anything? “, Huffman said. “The problem, I would like to deal with and solve it by the end of the year, and whether it is through Bill 151 or by a Senate bill or some other vehicle, I don’t know.

The chair goes on to say that there is a fundamental fairness issue that needs to be addressed.

“I’m certainly sympathetic to what Bill is trying to do,” he added. “I’m also sympathetic to people it may affect.”

Like all of these issues, he said, there are nuances and that’s why “moving floor amendments in unrelated bills are a bad way to do business.”

As for the language on genital inspection, Huffman said he had no opinion on that, because it’s not his specialty.

This is the kind of stuff you have to sit on, you have testimonials, you work out the details, you talk to experts,” he added. “And in all honesty, me trying to answer that question, that’s exactly what I’m criticizing other people to do, which is just go ahead and vote – you really don’t know exactly how this is all going to turn out.”

None of the bills will be heard again until the fall.

Follow WEWS Statehouse reporter Morgan Trau on Twitter and Facebook.

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Senate passes bill against trans girls playing women’s sports | New Policies https://cflweb.org/senate-passes-bill-against-trans-girls-playing-womens-sports-new-policies/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 22:28:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/senate-passes-bill-against-trans-girls-playing-womens-sports-new-policies/ By BROOKE SCHULTZ, Reporting for America HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The Pennsylvania Senate on Tuesday passed Republican-sponsored legislation banning transgender women from participating in women’s sports. The proposal, which passed 30-20, is now heading to the House, where an identical bill was previously approved. One Democrat, Senator Lisa Boscola of Northampton County, crossed party lines […]]]>

By BROOKE SCHULTZ, Reporting for America

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The Pennsylvania Senate on Tuesday passed Republican-sponsored legislation banning transgender women from participating in women’s sports.

The proposal, which passed 30-20, is now heading to the House, where an identical bill was previously approved. One Democrat, Senator Lisa Boscola of Northampton County, crossed party lines to vote for the Senate version.

Sponsored by Sen. Judy Ward, R-Blair, the bill requires public K-12 schools and colleges to designate sports as men’s, women‘s or co-ed.

During the floor debate, supporters argued that the bill would level the playing field for cisgender women. Opponents said the bill would hurt vulnerable young people.

political cartoons

“Where are the feminists? said Sen. Doug Mastriano, R-Franklin, the current Republican gubernatorial nominee, who supports the measure. “I stand on the side of female athletes. I am on the side of science.

“My colleagues opposite asked: where are the feminists? We are here,” said Sen. Amanda Cappelletti, D-Montgomery. “We oppose Senate Bill 1191 because trans girls are girls; trans women are women.

Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf will veto the legislation if it gets to his office, his spokeswoman Beth Rementer said.

“Republicans in the General Assembly have made it clear that they would rather focus on attention-grabbing stunts than critical issues,” she said in an email.

More than a dozen other states have passed legislation prohibiting transgender athletes from participating in sports consistent with their gender identity.

Brooke Schultz is a member of the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places reporters in local newsrooms to report on underreported issues. Follow Brooke Schultz on Twitter.

Copyright 2022 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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As states target trans kids, New York lawmakers vote to let homeless teens make their own health decisions https://cflweb.org/as-states-target-trans-kids-new-york-lawmakers-vote-to-let-homeless-teens-make-their-own-health-decisions/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 15:42:33 +0000 https://cflweb.org/as-states-target-trans-kids-new-york-lawmakers-vote-to-let-homeless-teens-make-their-own-health-decisions/ The legislation would amend the existing Public Health Act to empower children under the age of 18 classified as “runaway or homeless youth,” or RHY, to provide consent for medical, dental, health and hospital services, and intervenes amid a wave of legislation targeting trans children elsewhere in the country. Council of NYC/William Alatriste Dental care […]]]>

The legislation would amend the existing Public Health Act to empower children under the age of 18 classified as “runaway or homeless youth,” or RHY, to provide consent for medical, dental, health and hospital services, and intervenes amid a wave of legislation targeting trans children elsewhere in the country.

Council of NYC/William Alatriste

Dental care at Callen-Lorde Community Health Center, which provides health services to LGBTQ+ New Yorkers.

Click here to learn more about City Limits’ series on family and youth homelessness.

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#AM_Equality: May 31, 2022 – Human Rights Campaign https://cflweb.org/am_equality-may-31-2022-human-rights-campaign/ Tue, 31 May 2022 14:13:27 +0000 https://cflweb.org/am_equality-may-31-2022-human-rights-campaign/ COMMENT: I ​​LOVE DEFINE MYSELF AS “PANSEXUAL” — SOMETIMES LABELS CAN BE USEFUL: For many members of the LGBTQ+ community, finding a label that works for them can be daunting. Nyanda Foday, former Birmingham Young Poet Laureate (@NyandaIsAPoet) explains how labeling yourself can be useful and how to find the label that works best for […]]]>

COMMENT: I ​​LOVE DEFINE MYSELF AS “PANSEXUAL” — SOMETIMES LABELS CAN BE USEFUL: For many members of the LGBTQ+ community, finding a label that works for them can be daunting. Nyanda Foday, former Birmingham Young Poet Laureate (@NyandaIsAPoet) explains how labeling yourself can be useful and how to find the label that works best for you, i.e. if you want one. More GAYTIMES.

⚽ AMERICAN SOCCER HAS OFFICIALLY BANNED ANTI-LGBTQ+ SONGS: The organization’s new policy will penalize clubs and promoters who engage in or permit offensive chanting related to sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion or gender. Failure to comply with the new policy will result in heavy fines and bans. More outdoor sports.

📍 IN THE STATES

BLACK TRANS YOUTH TARGET IN INDIANA SCHOOLS SPORTS BILL: Due to a higher risk of mental health issues in addition to increasing violence against black trans people across the country, black trans youth are already a disproportionately vulnerable group. Now, with anti-trans sports bills passing in many states, advocates are concerned for the safety and health of black trans children. “In 2022, we are already discussing the importance of safety for all trans people in this country, and the urgent need for protective policy that ensures our well-being and prosperity,” said HRC Director of Community Engagement for the Transgender Justice Initiative Tori Cooper (@MsToriCooper1she she). More the Black Wall Street Times.

LOUISIANA RE-APPROVES ANTI-TRANS SPORTS BILL, SETTING UP VETO FIGHT: Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards vetoed a similar bill last year. More Lawyer.

📺 GET CULTURED

LGBTQ+ ACTRESS AND ACTIVIST LAVERNE COX HONORED WITH HER OWN BARBIE DOLL: This will be the first time Mattel has released a Barbie inspired by a transgender woman. More USA today and The Washington Post.

🎬 FRAMELINE ANNOUNCES FULL LINEUP FOR 2022 LGBTQ+ FILM FESTIVAL: The Frameline Film Festival, which is the largest LGBTQ+ film festival in the world, will take place from June 16 to 26. The San Francisco Bay Area festival will feature 125 films from around the world. There will also be a streaming option for those not in the Bay Area. More than frame line and EDGE Multimedia Network.

🌍 GLOBAL EQUALITY

ADVOCACY GROUPS IN SENEGAL DEMAND BETTER TREATMENT OF LGBTQ+ DETAINEES: According to the founder of the Collectif Free du Sénégal, Souleymane Diouf, LGBTQ+ detainees are often subjected to physical and sexual violence by inmates and guards. Senegalese officials and anti-LGBTQ+ groups continue to push for even tougher legislation regarding same-sex relationships. More the WAshington Blade.

LITHUANIAN LEGISLATIVES AGREE TO CONSIDER SAME-SEX PARTNERSHIP DRAFT LAW: More AlJazeera.

News ? Send us your news and tips at AMEquality@hrc.org. Click here to subscribe to #AM_Equality and follow @HRC for all the latest news. Thanks for reading!

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These 7 Trans Pride Events Are Bringing Much-Needed Joy To 2022 https://cflweb.org/these-7-trans-pride-events-are-bringing-much-needed-joy-to-2022/ Thu, 26 May 2022 22:11:53 +0000 https://cflweb.org/these-7-trans-pride-events-are-bringing-much-needed-joy-to-2022/ Most events are both in-person and online, so if venturing into an actual panel or DJ set isn’t an option for you, tune in for free via Zoom. All in-person participants must show proof of vaccination. Capital Trans Pride Pool Party: June 11 Capital Trans Pride in Washington DC is setting a new date for […]]]>

Most events are both in-person and online, so if venturing into an actual panel or DJ set isn’t an option for you, tune in for free via Zoom. All in-person participants must show proof of vaccination.

Capital Trans Pride Pool Party: June 11

Capital Trans Pride in Washington DC is setting a new date for its Trans March, but in the meantime it plans to hold smaller events like its trans pool party on June 11, 2022. Organizers are encouraging attendees to come “refresh” after the DC Pride Parade with live music, appetizers and drinks.

The event is free, but be sure to book your tickets in advance and bring your proof of vaccination to the door.

Trans March San Francisco: June 24

the San Francisco Trans Walk is one of the largest Trans Pride events in the world. Organizers were thrilled to announce that it will be hosting in-person events on Friday, June 24, 2022 for the first time since 2019, including a resource fair, intergenerational brunch, and the Trans Walk itself. More information will be announced closer to the event date, so be sure to check back during Pride Month itself.

Trans Resistance MA March and Festival: June 25

Boston Pride officially disbanded in 2021 after organizers have been accused racism, anti-blackness and transphobia by volunteers and committee members. However, Trans Resistance MAan organization “advocating for the safety, joy and liberation of TQBIPOC,” will hold a march on June 25. On the same day, the organization will also organize a full program of events, including a festival filled with performances, vendors and self-help campaigns.

Queer Liberation March in New York: June 26

the Queer Liberation March in New York is an annual event dedicated to reclaiming pride for trans freedom and BIPOC. This year’s march, titled “BECAUSE CONTROL OVER OUR BODIES AND OUR LIVES IS CONTROL OVER OUR BODIES AND OUR LIVES! will take place on Sunday, June 26 in Manhattan.

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Indiana lawmakers enact ban on trans sports with veto waiver https://cflweb.org/indiana-lawmakers-enact-ban-on-trans-sports-with-veto-waiver/ Wed, 25 May 2022 06:12:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/indiana-lawmakers-enact-ban-on-trans-sports-with-veto-waiver/ INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Republican lawmakers in Indiana voted on Tuesday to override the GOP governor’s veto of a bill banning transgender women from participating in girls’ school sports and joining more than a dozen schools. other states that have passed similar laws in the past two years. State senators voted 32-15 in favor of overthrowing […]]]>

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Republican lawmakers in Indiana voted on Tuesday to override the GOP governor’s veto of a bill banning transgender women from participating in girls’ school sports and joining more than a dozen schools. other states that have passed similar laws in the past two years.

State senators voted 32-15 in favor of overthrowing Gov. Eric Holcomb following the same action in a 67-28 vote by the House earlier in the day. Holcomb had said in his veto message that the bill did not provide a cohesive policy for what he called “fairness in K-12 sports” when he unexpectedly vetoed it in March.

The by-pass votes were nearly toeing the party line, and no lawmaker has changed their votes since the start of this year. Four Republican senators joined all Democratic senators in voting for the veto. In the House, three Republicans voted to uphold the veto, while one Democrat supported overturning it.

Opponents have argued that the bill is a bigoted response to a problem that does not exist. The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana filed a lawsuit after the waiver in hopes of preventing the law from going into effect as planned on July 1.

The lawsuit was filed on behalf of a 10-year-old girl who plays on her school’s all-female softball team in Indianapolis. The new law would disqualify the fourth-grader from joining her team because she is a transgender girl, which is a violation of Title IX and the US Constitution. according to the complaint.

Holcomb said in a statement after the waiver that his “stance has not changed.”

“There are no cases remaining and the process, which is managed by the Indiana High School Athletic Association, is working. I support my decision to veto HB 1041, he said.

Republican sponsors of the bill maintain that it is necessary to protect the integrity of women’s sports and opportunities for girls to obtain college athletic scholarships, but have reported no cases in the state of girls being outmatched by transgender athletes.

“(This measure) does not solve a problem. It does not bring people together. It does not benefit our state in any way,” Democratic Sen. JD Ford of Indianapolis said shortly before the Senate vote. “Why are you pressuring the government to solve this problem, which is not a problem? »

Republican Senate President Pro Tem Rodric Bray said the state needs the policy and called it “a simple matter of fairness.”

“We don’t like being sued in the state of Indiana, but it happens every once in a while,” Bray said. “It’s a policy I think we can support.”

The veto votes took place at a special one-day meeting 11 weeks after the end of this year’s regular legislative session. Democrats had called on lawmakers to act instead on a proposal to suspend the state’s 56 cents per gallon gas tax amid soaring national fuel prices. Republicans ignored this request.

House Democratic Leader Phil GiaQuinta of Fort Wayne lamented that Republicans are focusing on divisive cultural issues that “will do nothing to help move the state of Indiana forward.”

“Certainly we have pressing issues that affect Hoosiers every day, in particular, including the high gas prices we are seeing across the state,” GiaQuinta said. “I wish I could have potentially used that day to better help Hoosiers.”

Activists staged a rally against the ban ahead of votes in the Legislative Assembly. Dozens of attendees, including several families with transgender youth, played sidewalk games around the Statehouse lawn. They argued that Indiana’s ban was not aimed at elite athletes, but rather at children who want to play on a team with their friends.

“We are here to fight the hate and discrimination that could have a lifelong impact on my family,” said Cara Nimskey, mother of a transgender daughter from Bloomington. “My daughter dreams of playing basketball in high school. This is an unfair exclusion – it will be overwritten if this materializes.

Holcomb’s veto came a day before Republican Utah Gov. Spencer Cox vetoed a similar ban on the grounds that such laws target vulnerable children who are already at high risk for suicide. Republican lawmakers in Utah overturned the veto days later amid a flurry of such laws that political observers describe as a classic “corner question” to rouse conservative supporters.

In his letter of vetoHolcomb pointed to IHSAA, which has a policy covering transgender students wishing to play sports that align with their gender identity and said no transgender girls have finalized an application to play on a women’s team. The law would not prevent students who identify as transgender women or men from playing on men’s sports teams.

Holcomb said in his veto message that the bill assumes “there is an existing problem in K-12 sports in Indiana that requires further intervention by the state government,” but that it does not found no evidence to support this claim “even though I support the overall effort.”

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Associated Press writer Tom Davies contributed to this report.

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Casey Smith is a member of the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places reporters in local newsrooms to report on underreported issues. Follow Smith on Twitter.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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