Sex Descrimination – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 22:27:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://cflweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Sex Descrimination – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ 32 32 Hearing set as ex-Lee County district attorney tries to avoid jail https://cflweb.org/hearing-set-as-ex-lee-county-district-attorney-tries-to-avoid-jail/ https://cflweb.org/hearing-set-as-ex-lee-county-district-attorney-tries-to-avoid-jail/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 12:27:11 +0000 https://cflweb.org/hearing-set-as-ex-lee-county-district-attorney-tries-to-avoid-jail/ Posted: Oct 14, 2021 / 8:27 AM EDT / Update: Oct 14, 2021 / 8:29 AM EDT LEE COUNTY, Alabama (WRBL) – Former Lee County District Attorney Brandon Hughes is scheduled to appear in a Colbert County courtroom on November 9 for a hearing on his demand to avoid jail and move on his sentence […]]]>

Posted:
Update:

LEE COUNTY, Alabama (WRBL) – Former Lee County District Attorney Brandon Hughes is scheduled to appear in a Colbert County courtroom on November 9 for a hearing on his demand to avoid jail and move on his sentence in a community correctional program similar to probation.

The initial hearing was set for October 5 in Lee County, but was postponed due to a family emergency with one of the attendees. It is not yet clear why the hearing is not taking place in Lee County.

Hughes asks to participate in a community corrections program that allows him to stay at home instead of serving 10 months in jail. Hughes’ attorney accepted jail time in June when he stopped his trial after testimony began and agreed to plead guilty to an ethics violation and first degree perjury.

The Alabama attorney general’s office has charged Hughes with five ethics violations and perjury. Hughes spent $ 14,000 of taxpayer dollars to settle a sex discrimination complaint involving a former employee. The GA’s office is pushing for Hughes to spend time in jail.

Hughes has also been charged with illegally hiring his children to work in the DA office and conspiring to steal a vehicle from a Chambers County business using a Lee County search warrant.

News 3 will keep you posted.


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Atty fired after parental leave must arbitrate, 1st Circ. Said https://cflweb.org/atty-fired-after-parental-leave-must-arbitrate-1st-circ-said/ https://cflweb.org/atty-fired-after-parental-leave-must-arbitrate-1st-circ-said/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 16:25:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/atty-fired-after-parental-leave-must-arbitrate-1st-circ-said/ By Brian Dowling (October 13, 2021, 12:25 p.m. EDT) – A Maine law firm accused of firing a partner for taking parental leave told the First Circuit on Tuesday that a federal judge in Boston was right to transfer the gender discrimination case to arbitration earlier this year. Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios LLP, who […]]]>
By Brian Dowling (October 13, 2021, 12:25 p.m. EDT) – A Maine law firm accused of firing a partner for taking parental leave told the First Circuit on Tuesday that a federal judge in Boston was right to transfer the gender discrimination case to arbitration earlier this year.

Preti Flaherty Beliveau & Pachios LLP, who claims to have fired Bryan O’Brien due to poor performance, argued in a brief that the Massachusetts District Court rightly saw a valid arbitration clause in the letter of offer. from society to lawyer.

The cabinet disputed O’Brien’s claim that he knowingly misstated Massachusetts law, but said the claim is irrelevant because Maine law is what ultimately governs the law. pursuit …

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DC Comics announces new Superman is part of LGBTQ + community https://cflweb.org/dc-comics-announces-new-superman-is-part-of-lgbtq-community/ https://cflweb.org/dc-comics-announces-new-superman-is-part-of-lgbtq-community/#respond Tue, 12 Oct 2021 05:29:39 +0000 https://cflweb.org/dc-comics-announces-new-superman-is-part-of-lgbtq-community/ WASHINGTON – No one could have imagined the life of Anna Pauline (Pauli) Murray, the black, queer and gender nonconforming civil rights pioneer who lived from 1910 to 1985. Few have done as much to make the world fairer than Murray. Last year, Murray’s scholarship was used to help the ACLU successfully argue before the […]]]>

WASHINGTON – No one could have imagined the life of Anna Pauline (Pauli) Murray, the black, queer and gender nonconforming civil rights pioneer who lived from 1910 to 1985.

Few have done as much to make the world fairer than Murray. Last year, Murray’s scholarship was used to help the ACLU successfully argue before the Supreme Court that Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act protects LGBTQ + people from dismissal at the venue. work because of their sexual orientation and gender identity. Yet a lot of people don’t know who Murray was.

“My Name is Pauli Murray,” a new documentary airing in select theaters and airing on Amazon Prime, tells the story of Murray’s fascinating life. The gripping film is co-directed by Betsy West and Julie Cohen, who directed “RBG,” the popular documentary about Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

“RBG” is a good documentary. Still, the 131-minute “My Name is Pauli Murray” is even better.

Conveying the complexity of Murray’s life in such a short document would bring down many mortals. But West and Cohen are up to the task.

Use of recordings of Murray’s voice; Murray’s letters, footage of everything from Murray with one of his dogs in Harlem in the 1930s, plus interviews with Murray’s family and biographers, the film takes you into Murray’s world.

To say that Murray was a Renaissance woman is not trivial. Murray was a lawyer, poet, writer, activist and educator. This is just the tip of the iceberg!

For decades Murray and Eleanor Roosevelt were friends. Murray was a co-founder of the National Organization for Women. Gay writers James Baldwin and Langston Hughes were his writing buddies. Murray and Baldwin were the first black writers to be invited to the prestigious MacDowell Writers’ Colony.

In his sixties, Murray left her teaching position at Brandeis University to attend seminary. She became the first black woman to be ordained a priest by the Episcopal Church.

It doesn’t stop there! An article Murray wrote while a student at Howard Law School was a key part of Thurgood Marshall’s strategy to reverse racial segregation in Brown v. Board of Education. Ruth Bader Ginsburg cited Murray when she argued against gender discrimination in the Supreme Court.

While she was alive, Murray was locked in for much of her personal life. Murray had a decades-long relationship with Irene Barlow. But, due to the times she lived in, Murray couldn’t be open about their relationship.

Murray sensed that she was mismatched, like a man in a woman’s body. This, too, Murray kept a secret.

In “My name is Pauli Murray” Murray’s family and biographers refer to Murray with the pronouns “she and she”. A non-binary activist calls Murray “they”.

Murray is having a well-deserved moment. In 2016, Yale University named one of its residential colleges after Murray. It was the first time that a Yale college had been named after a person of color or an (openly) LGBTQ + person. In 1965, Murray was the first African American to earn a doctorate in forensic science from Yale.

In 2017, the National Park Service, part of the Home Office, designated Murray’s family home in Durham, North Carolina, as a National Historic Landmark.

Watching “My name is Pauli Murray” you are blown away by Murray’s resilience and accomplishments. Fifteen years before Rosa Parks, she protested against racial segregation on buses.

“I lived to see my lost causes found,” Murray says.

It is difficult to humanize an icon. But, the filmmakers don’t put Murray on Mount Olympus.

Even as a child, we learn, Murray wanted to wear pants. It was fine during the week, her aunt Pauline said, but Murray is expected to wear a dress to church on Sunday. Although not many understood Murray’s feelings, Aunt Pauline called Murray “my boy”.

Murray and Barlow have never lived together. Yet you get a sense of their privacy in the letters they exchanged. They were called “Linus” and “Charlie Brown” (characters from the Peanuts comics) and wrote that they wanted to “share” while listening to Brahms’ Fourth Symphony and the New York Times puzzle.

“My name is Pauli Murray” will let you talk about Murray and how to honor his legacy. It would have made Murray happy.


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No dismissals despite nearly 250 allegations of sexual misconduct among Scottish police officers https://cflweb.org/no-dismissals-despite-nearly-250-allegations-of-sexual-misconduct-among-scottish-police-officers/ https://cflweb.org/no-dismissals-despite-nearly-250-allegations-of-sexual-misconduct-among-scottish-police-officers/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 03:58:41 +0000 https://cflweb.org/no-dismissals-despite-nearly-250-allegations-of-sexual-misconduct-among-scottish-police-officers/ Scottish Police have received just under 250 complaints of sexual misconduct against police officers and special constables in the past four years. A total of 166 Police Scotland police officers and special constables have been charged with 245 counts of sexual misconduct, according to a Channel 4 Dispatches investigation. The documentary – Cops on Trial: […]]]>
Scottish Police have received just under 250 complaints of sexual misconduct against police officers and special constables in the past four years.

A total of 166 Police Scotland police officers and special constables have been charged with 245 counts of sexual misconduct, according to a Channel 4 Dispatches investigation.

The documentary – Cops on Trial: Dispatches – is scheduled to air tonight and will claim that there are potentially police officers on duty with proven cases of sexual misconduct.

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It adds to other data, obtained under freedom of information legislation, which found that 64 sexual assault complaints were lodged against Scottish Police officers between 2016 and 2020. Only two allegations have been confirmed, 39 unconfirmed, nine withdrawn or discontinued, and 14 investigations underway.

Police Scotland data responded to a request about the number of complaints of sexual assault against serving police officers and the complaints could relate to historical allegations.

It also comes after the chief of police said he would order an independent review in a tribunal which found evidence of a ‘sexist culture’ with the Scottish Police gun unit. Former firearms chief Rhona Malone took Police Scotland to court, alleging gender discrimination and victimization, the latter complaint being successful.

Responding to figures from Dispatches, Deputy Police Chief Fiona Taylor said: “Scottish Police demand the highest levels of integrity from our officers and staff and when someone does not meet this standard We are taking appropriate action We have no capacity under current conduct regulations to prevent an officer from resigning.

“Our officers will thoroughly investigate any complaint, regardless of the perpetrator. Sexism, misogyny and discrimination of all kinds are deplorable and unacceptable. They have no place in the police.

“Progress has been made, but there is still a lot of work to be done.

“We take extra care to ensure our culture is welcoming and inclusive, including independent review and oversight by an independent review group. “

Scottish Conservative shadow minister for community safety Russell Findlay said the figures were “shocking”.

“The majority of decent officers are appalled at those who tarnish their good reputation with this type of behavior, but they should also be frustrated with the way these cases are often handled.

“Too often they come up against a PR response to close ranks and protect the image of the Scottish Police rather than an honest admission that a problem exists and how it is resolved.

“It is shocking that so many Scottish police officers have been charged with reprehensible sexual acts but have apparently not been held to account.”

The numbers follow the heartbreaking case of Sarah Everard who was kidnapped and murdered by Police Officer Wayne Couzens on her way home to London.

Couzens will spend the rest of his life in prison after being sentenced in September. At the court hearing, he used his police position and warrant card in connection with his kidnapping of Ms. Everard.

It also emerged that Couzens was charged with indecent exposure in 2015, but was allowed to switch from Kent Police to Metropolitan Force.

The murder of Sarah Everard has led to nationwide discussions about how UK police services should respond to ensure women can feel safe when approached by a lone police officer.

Police Commissioner Cressida Dick met was called on to resign after advising worried women to hail a bus if they did not trust the police.

Interior Minister Priti Patel also launched an independent investigation this week into the “systematic failures” of the police following the murder of Ms Everard.

As part of its response, Police Scotland announced it would introduce a verification process which would see an officer’s personal radio be put on loudspeaker for a member of the public to verify the officer’s identity with from the control room.

An incident number will also be created to be displayed on the agent’s phone or radio to confirm the details of the broadcast message.

Tonight’s documentary will hear from a victim, Annie, who suffered years of domestic violence at the hands of PC Fraser Ross, who served in the Scottish Police.

PC Ross avoided jail and was sentenced to three years of community reimbursement, 250 hours of unpaid labor, and a six-year no-harassment order. He also resigned a week before his conviction but retained his pension.

A spokesperson for Police Scotland said: “Fraser Ross’ conduct fell well short of the high standards of professional behavior which the public rightly expects from the police and which the vast majority of officers and staff demonstrate on a daily basis. .

“The Scottish Police do not have the capacity under current rules of conduct to prevent an officer from resigning. Had Fraser Ross remained a serving officer, his actions would have been taken into account for serious misconduct at the end of the criminal case. “

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Waging a war on sexual harassment at work https://cflweb.org/waging-a-war-on-sexual-harassment-at-work/ https://cflweb.org/waging-a-war-on-sexual-harassment-at-work/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 04:22:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/waging-a-war-on-sexual-harassment-at-work/ Experts recommend ways to foster workplaces free from sexual harassment. #MeToo took the world by storm in 2017. The hashtag has become a way of supporting survivors of sexual violence, as well as a battle cry for reform. #MeToo has brought workplace sexual harassment to the forefront of the legal scene and forced employers to […]]]>

Experts recommend ways to foster workplaces free from sexual harassment.

#MeToo took the world by storm in 2017.

The hashtag has become a way of supporting survivors of sexual violence, as well as a battle cry for reform. #MeToo has brought workplace sexual harassment to the forefront of the legal scene and forced employers to take concrete action to end sexual violence.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits sexual harassment in the workplace. Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination based on sex where the harasser and the victim can be of any gender. Additionally, Title VII holds employers accountable for their efforts to maintain a workplace free from sexual harassment, including stopping the harassment once employers are notified of its presence.

According to the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, an action reaches the level of unlawful sexual harassment when it is “so frequent or so severe as to create a hostile or offensive work environment or when it results in an adverse decision on the matter. employment ”, such as dismissal. employment or demotion.

Apart from the federal directive, some state laws also protect workers from sexual harassment. For example, the California legislature has enacted laws that are stricter than other state and federal laws to address sexual harassment in the workplace. The California Fair Employment and Housing Act prohibits sexual harassment in the workplace and provides protection for all workers, including volunteers, independent contractors and interns.

Under California law, employers must take preventative measures to end sexual harassment. At the very least, employers should have a policy in place on sexual harassment.

Other state legislatures are working to strengthen the channels for reporting victims of sexual harassment in the workplace. Lawmakers in states such as Arizona, Rhode Island and Massachusetts have sought to pass legislation to crack down on the use of nondisclosure agreements in workplace harassment cases to create better reporting structures. .

In this week’s Saturday seminar, experts examine regulatory improvements that could end sexual harassment in the workplace.

  • In an article published in the Boston University Law Journal, Stephanie Bornstein of the University of Florida Levin College of Law argues that sexual harassment disclosure requirements, similar to the disclosure mechanisms in securities law, could help better enforce anti-discrimination regulations in the workplace. job. She recommends requiring disclosure of wages and promotions to help close the gender and race pay gap, as well as harassment resolution disclosures to change workplace cultures. Bornstein cautions, however, of the possible drawbacks of these approaches, such as privacy concerns, token compliance, and First Amendment issues.
  • Both sexual violence opponents and workers’ health advocates do not use a holistic perspective to understand workplace violence, says Katherine Lippel of the University of Ottawa in an article in the Oxford University Human Rights Hub Journal. To protect all workers from sexual violence, Lippel recommends legislation for occupational health and safety and workers’ compensation. Lippel suggests that workplaces can marginalize or ignore legislation aimed only at violence against women. To avoid this problem, Lippel proposes to draft legislation that protects everyone against workplace violence.
  • In an article by The Georgetown Journal of Gender and Law, Rachel Farkas and several co-authors advise lawyers who file or defend a sexual harassment complaint to be aware of differences between federal and state law. Farkas and his co-authors explain that some state laws follow Title VII, but many state laws provide better protection for those who experience sexual harassment in the workplace. Farkas and his co-authors highlight how new state laws and judicial interpretations of sexual harassment in the workplace have expanded protections for people with different sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression.
  • In an article for Colombian Law Review, Daniel Hemel of University of Chicago Law School and Dorothy Lund of Gould Law School at the University of Southern California argue that corporate law could help address sexual misconduct in the workplace. In order to encourage companies to take better preventive measures, Hemel and Lund propose to take legal action against company trustees who commit sexual harassment. Hemel and Lund explain that holding corporations accountable for harassing acts of their employees, even if the law protects defendants from personal liability, will require managers to more effectively protect victims at work.
  • In an article to appear in the South Carolina Law Journal, Galia Schneebaum of Harry Radzyner Law School discusses anti-harassment regulations in the workplace and how to clarify the legal framework for bullying and harassment in the workplace as a legal offense. She argues that workplace bullying regulations are separate from sexual harassment regulations because U.S. sexual harassment laws are based on social discrimination and the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Schneebaum explains how the safety framework , used to minimize bullying as a physical harm, and the Dignity Framework, which focuses on insult and humiliation, are insufficient to address the contours of workplace bullying. She recommends understanding workplace bullying as an “abuse of power”.

The Saturday Seminar is a weekly feature that aims to put in written form the type of content that would be conveyed in a live seminar involving regulatory experts. Every week, Regulatory review publishes a brief overview of a selected regulatory topic, then distills recent research and academic writing on that topic.


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California bars forced nondisclosure clauses in separation agreements https://cflweb.org/california-bars-forced-nondisclosure-clauses-in-separation-agreements/ https://cflweb.org/california-bars-forced-nondisclosure-clauses-in-separation-agreements/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 15:07:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/california-bars-forced-nondisclosure-clauses-in-separation-agreements/ Oct. 7 (Reuters) – California to ban companies from requiring non-disclosure agreements in regulations with employees over workplace harassment complaints under a bill signed Thursday in a victory for workers in the technology that defended the proposal. The Silenced No More Act was co-sponsored by Ifeoma Ozoma, who left Pinterest Inc (PINS.N) last year after […]]]>

Oct. 7 (Reuters) – California to ban companies from requiring non-disclosure agreements in regulations with employees over workplace harassment complaints under a bill signed Thursday in a victory for workers in the technology that defended the proposal.

The Silenced No More Act was co-sponsored by Ifeoma Ozoma, who left Pinterest Inc (PINS.N) last year after voicing concerns about racial and gender discrimination, and has also received support from organizations such as TechEquity Collaborative that advocate for workers in tech and other industries.

Supporters say the law, which comes into force on January 1, will allow workers to speak out about their experiences of harassment and discrimination without fear that companies will break severance pay. They say allowing more people to speak publicly about workplace treatment could help fight systemic racism and other issues that plague many businesses.

The new law states that settlement agreements cannot prevent or restrict workers from disclosing facts related to harassment and discrimination complaints they have filed against the company. It also prohibits regulations from including non-bashing clauses that prevent people from talking about illegal acts in the workplace.

As part of efforts to respond to the #metoo stories, California lawmakers three years ago banned companies from imposing non-disclosure agreements, or NDAs, in cases of sexual harassment, sexual assault, or of gender discrimination, fearing that secret deals would allow companies to maintain problematic cultures.

The new law covers confidentiality in a wider range of cases, including racial discrimination and harassment based on disability.

Ozoma said last year that as a black woman, she was sidelined by Pinterest officials for certain tasks and underpaid. Supporters said the new law will help hold businesses accountable for their promises to provide a diverse and inclusive workplace.

Pinterest signed on as a supporter of the legislation.

Reporting by Paresh Dave; Editing by Stephen Coates

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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Rhona Malone: ​​Guns officer “devastated” after exposing sexism in Scottish police https://cflweb.org/rhona-malone-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bguns-officer-devastated-after-exposing-sexism-in-scottish-police/ https://cflweb.org/rhona-malone-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bguns-officer-devastated-after-exposing-sexism-in-scottish-police/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 08:57:17 +0000 https://cflweb.org/rhona-malone-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bguns-officer-devastated-after-exposing-sexism-in-scottish-police/ A former gun official told how she found herself “devastated” and “in dire straits” after falling victim to Scottish police for complaining about a sexist culture within her unit. Rhona Malone formed a labor versus force tribunal alleging gender discrimination and victimization, with the tribunal finding the unit to be an “absolute boys club”. The […]]]>

A former gun official told how she found herself “devastated” and “in dire straits” after falling victim to Scottish police for complaining about a sexist culture within her unit.

Rhona Malone formed a labor versus force tribunal alleging gender discrimination and victimization, with the tribunal finding the unit to be an “absolute boys club”.

The court heard that Ms Malone’s supervisor, Inspector Keith Warhurst, sent an email in January 2018 indicating that two female gun officers should not be deployed together as it affected “the balance of the testosterone ”.

He also said another colleague was going to “screw this up,” referring to a female officer, and sent pictures of topless women to a WhatsApp task force.

READ MORE: Court finds’ sexist, boys’ club ‘culture in gun unit

A chief firearms instructor also told a colleague of Ms Malone that women should not be firearms officers “because they have their period and it affects their temper.”

The court found that when Ms Malone filed a grievance, the force victimized her by threatening to take away her firearms authority and suggesting that she could be transferred to another unit.

The 45-year-old, who lost her sex discrimination complaint, has since retired from the police for health reasons after suffering from work-related stress.

Following the publication of the judgment, Scottish police apologized to Ms Malone, saying her response to her concerns was ‘far from sufficient’.

Ms Malone told the Herald that she would never forgive bosses for what happened.
She said: “I never wanted all of this to happen. I was a dedicated and committed police officer and I didn’t do anything wrong except say “please stop this and let me do my job”.

“It was all I wanted to do. I would never have left the police, it was my life. It was all devastating.

“I went through a long period of mourning because something that I loved was taken away from me.

“If it hadn’t happened, if this culture hadn’t existed, I would still have been a police officer.

She added: “I am satisfied with the court decision, I feel justified. But it cost me a lot to get here, financially, emotionally and mentally.

“When I think about it, it was awful, I was in such a dark place, I was in dire straits. I had never had any mental health issues before and now I have to deal with it everyday and they did this to me. I will never forgive them for what happened.

READ MORE: Larger armed police presence to be deployed in Glasgow during COP26

Ms Malone, from West Lothian, had worked as a police officer for seven years before becoming an Authorized Firearms Officer (AFO) in the Scottish Police Armed Response Vehicle (ARV) team in 2016.

She was based in Edinburgh, within Fettes Team 1, in October 2016, where she was one of two women from a team of 12 AFOs. Of 60 AFOs in Edinburgh’s ARV division, four were women.

His lawyer, Margaret Gribbon, called the labor court ruling “damning”.

“The results expose the misogynistic attitudes and culture within the armed police and the hostile treatment the police face when they try to call them,” she said.

“Equally worrying are the findings of the Labor Court that it did not consider much of the evidence it heard from Police Scotland witnesses to be credible. The serious problems which this judgment highlights must be addressed urgently by the Scottish Police ”.

Herald Scotland:

Deputy Police Chief Mark Williams said: “It is clear that the culture of the armed police in 2017 and 2018 was unacceptable. Since then, we have worked hard to improve the standards, but we know that there is still a long way to go.

“As an organization, our response when a dedicated female officer raised legitimate concerns was far from sufficient. I wholeheartedly apologize to Ms. Malone for these shortcomings and for the significant impact they had on her.

“This judgment highlights serious problems and we will put in place measures to address them as a matter of urgency.”


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Carter’s manager secures second victory in ageism and sexism case https://cflweb.org/carters-manager-secures-second-victory-in-ageism-and-sexism-case/ https://cflweb.org/carters-manager-secures-second-victory-in-ageism-and-sexism-case/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 19:35:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/carters-manager-secures-second-victory-in-ageism-and-sexism-case/ By Anne Cullen (October 6, 2021, 3:35 p.m. EDT) – A Carter legal official suing the children’s clothing retailer for age and gender discrimination will have another chance to show his salary and advancement were stranded because she is a woman in her 60s, a Georgia federal judge ruled on Wednesday. A judge gave a […]]]>
By Anne Cullen (October 6, 2021, 3:35 p.m. EDT) – A Carter legal official suing the children’s clothing retailer for age and gender discrimination will have another chance to show his salary and advancement were stranded because she is a woman in her 60s, a Georgia federal judge ruled on Wednesday.

A judge gave a Carter’s legal officer another chance to show she had been discriminated against because of her age and gender. (AP Photo / Nam Y. Huh) Although a magistrate in August recommended dismissing Nancy Goodwin’s trial, U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg offered Carter’s manager the opportunity to freshen up her complaint for compensate some …

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Former Blizzard legal chief joins digital avatar company Genies https://cflweb.org/former-blizzard-legal-chief-joins-digital-avatar-company-genies/ https://cflweb.org/former-blizzard-legal-chief-joins-digital-avatar-company-genies/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 23:26:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/former-blizzard-legal-chief-joins-digital-avatar-company-genies/ Claire Hart announced her departure as video game maker Activision Blizzard faced SEC investigation Genies to Open New Market for NFTs (Reuters) – The former chief lawyer for Blizzard Entertainment Inc has joined a Los Angeles-based avatar tech company poised to launch an online marketplace for digital products known as non-fungible tokens . Genies Inc […]]]>
  • Claire Hart announced her departure as video game maker Activision Blizzard faced SEC investigation
  • Genies to Open New Market for NFTs

(Reuters) – The former chief lawyer for Blizzard Entertainment Inc has joined a Los Angeles-based avatar tech company poised to launch an online marketplace for digital products known as non-fungible tokens .

Genies Inc announced Monday that Claire Hart has joined the company as the first general counsel. Genies is partnering with Dapper Labs Inc, which helped launch Top Shot, the US National Basketball Association’s NFT Marketplace, to launch its own Marketplace where users can purchase digital items for their avatars. .

Genies represents “thousands of different celebrities as avatars,” said CEO and founder Akash Nigam, including musicians Cardi B, Justin Bieber and Shawn Mendes.

“We believe avatars are a new tool for showing new sides of your personality that photos, videos and text can’t justify,” said Nigam.

Nigam touted Hart’s strengths as a negotiator, saying “she’s going to be a good strong arm in a lot of these negotiations.” He added that Hart will have the discretion to hire more lawyers to work in-house or continue to bring in an outside lawyer.

“She will have the budget,” he said.

Hart left Blizzard in mid-September as video game maker and parent company Activision Blizzard Inc faced a close review of his workplace practices, including allegations of sex discrimination and harassment sexual.

She announced that she was leaving the same day Activision Blizzard said the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission was investigating her disclosures regarding employment matters and related issues. Hart has not been publicly linked to the harassment and bias allegations that have rocked Blizzard since July, when the California anti-discrimination agency first filed a complaint. Since then, the video game maker has seen a stream of high-profile departures.

A Blizzard spokesperson previously told Reuters that Hart had not left due to the SEC investigation.

Last week, Activision Blizzard and the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced that they had reached an agreement to resolve complaints of sexual harassment and discrimination in the company’s workplace.

The ongoing controversy at Blizzard hasn’t affected Genies’ idea of ​​hiring Hart, Nigam said.

“We have followed a fully controlled process and we are very confident in our decision,” said Nigam.

Read more:

Activision Blizzard and US employment watchdog reach agreement in sexual harassment and discrimination case

Blizzard loses best lawyer as federal regulators investigate video game giant

US Securities Regulator Investigates Activision Over Employment Issues

How a 10-second music video sold for $ 6.6 million

David thomas

David Thomas reports on legal affairs including law firm strategy, hiring, mergers and litigation. He is based in Chicago. He can be reached at d.thomas@thomsonreuters.com and on Twitter @ DaveThomas5150.


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State dismissed summary judgment over sexual harassment of former DOC officer and allegations of retaliation https://cflweb.org/state-dismissed-summary-judgment-over-sexual-harassment-of-former-doc-officer-and-allegations-of-retaliation/ https://cflweb.org/state-dismissed-summary-judgment-over-sexual-harassment-of-former-doc-officer-and-allegations-of-retaliation/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 17:30:32 +0000 https://cflweb.org/state-dismissed-summary-judgment-over-sexual-harassment-of-former-doc-officer-and-allegations-of-retaliation/ The state of Indiana faces complaints of sexual harassment and retaliation from a former correctional officer, although the complaint of discrimination based on the woman’s sex was dismissed with prejudice. Judge James Sweeney of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana dismissed summary judgment rendered to the state over sexual harassment […]]]>

The state of Indiana faces complaints of sexual harassment and retaliation from a former correctional officer, although the complaint of discrimination based on the woman’s sex was dismissed with prejudice.

Judge James Sweeney of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana dismissed summary judgment rendered to the state over sexual harassment and discrimination complaints filed by Amber McCracken, who was fired from the Department of correction from Indiana in July 2019. McCracken alleged that she had been subjected to a hostile work environment for almost all of her employment at Putnamville Correctional Institution, which began in November 2017.

Sweeney’s 49-page order described 16 incidents of alleged sexual harassment, discrimination and / or retaliation by McCracken’s co-workers and supervisor.

The long story began in December 2017, when McCracken alleged that Constable JD Robertson ordered him to “put [her] a– against the wall ”because he“ couldn’t concentrate on what was going on around him ”.

Then, in February 2018, Constable David Harris sat down at the desk where McCracken worked and slipped his hand from the inside of his thigh to his knee. When she tried to walk away, Harris wrapped her arm around her neck and “blew heavily into her ear.”

McCracken filed an incident report with human resources generalist Kathy Goss, who said the allegations were unfounded because there were no third-party witnesses and because there had been no of previous complaints against Harris. Instead, Goss gave Harris a “tough talk.”

Another officer relieved McCracken of her post so that she could discuss the Harris incident with supervisors. The next day, two offenders told him that the relief officer had disclosed personal information about McCracken to the offenders and had made sexually explicit comments about him.

While McCracken reported this incident, the then lieutenant. Donanld Pinkston, his supervisor, came by. Pinkston had previously told McCracken that she didn’t want to be known as the “kind of person who reports like this all the time.” Upon seeing her report another incident, Pinkston said she was not allowed to be alone with a male officer as they “didn’t need another” report of sexual harassment from her.

McCracken reported Pinkston’s comment, which he denied. Goss told him not to make such comments, but McCracken claimed no action was taken against the lieutenant or the officer who allegedly leaked information about him.

About two weeks later, McCracken tried to enter a checkpoint gate Harris was guarding. She claimed Harris saw her standing in front of him but wouldn’t let her in. He let in a male officer, however, and McCracken entered with him.

As she passed, Harris began to slam the door. McCracken reported the incident to Pinkston, who “laughed” and told him to be professional.

That same day, Harris called McCracken after work and accused her of guiding him.

Several months later, Agent Tanner Wright put his hand on McCracken’s thigh and suggested that they “slip away” to have sex. McCracken declined but did not report the incident. Instead, she requested and was allowed to move away from Wright, although she did not explain the reason for her request.

The following incident also involved Wright. This time, McCracken claimed, he grabbed her buttocks as she passed. Again, she did not report the incident, believing it would be “futile”.

However, when she submitted a resignation letter in November 2018, she recounted the two incidents involving Wright. She also included them in a charge filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Also in November 2018, Constable Jason Coons told McCracken that the offenders would be “happy to see her” because “all day yesterday everyone [Coons] heard about was [McCracken’s] a-. “McCracken filed an incident report and Coons was told his comment was unacceptable. However, Pinkston also stated that Coons” didn’t mean anything by that. “

As she waited for the incident with Coons to be resolved, McCracken learned that her request for time off for her marriage and her daughter’s pageant had been denied. Her then fiancé, another DOC officer, had been approved for the same request, but McCracken’s was “lost.”

At the same time, McCracken asked Pinkston and the Cpt. Olan Wheeler if she could receive additional training to expand her career opportunities. Wheeler said no due to his disciplinary issues, which McCracken interpreted to mean his occasional absences from the mandatory appeal.

Pinkston later confirmed that the roll call issue was preventing McCracken from training. But he added that “if it were up to me personally, I would never train you or any other woman to [the segregated housing units]. “If McCracken complained about that comment,” Pinkston added, “he would claim that she was angry because he refused her request for oral sex.

McCracken submitted his resignation letter the next day, referencing Pinkston’s comments and Wright’s conduct. She then requested leave, which was never formally granted, but rescinded her resignation and returned to work after two weeks.

About a month after returning to work, McCracken met with manager Brian Smith, who requested copies of the incident reports. He added that it appeared that all incidents had been handled appropriately, and that it would be McCracken’s word against the word of the male agents, which “looked better” than his.

Around the same time, McCracken was approved for the training she requested, but first had to pass an assessment with the Firearms Review Board. According to McCracken, Pinkston sat on the board, accused her of not taking the exam seriously and shattered her confidence. She did not pass the initial assessment, but passed a subsequent assessment which was conducted without Pinkston.

The day before the training, however, McCracken learned that Pinkston had removed her from the list of participants. She asked Wheeler about it, and he indicated that she was still expected to attend the training, which she did. But on the same day she spoke with Wheeler, McCracken claimed Pinkston watched her for 30 to 45 minutes while she worked.

In the summer of 2019, McCracken filed another incident report. This time, she alleged that her agents repeatedly called her to ask questions about her relationship issues with her husband, another DOC employee.

Also that summer, McCracken wore her hair to work one day. That day, McCracken claims, Pinkston walked up to her and pulled her hair, saying, “What is this?”

She filed an incident report and Pinkston claimed he told her her hairstyle was not in line with DOC policy. Sweeney’s order says her hair was fine. Goss told Pinkston not to touch people’s hair.

Finally, McCracken claimed that she couldn’t find agents to cover her when she needed to use the restroom. In one incident, she said, she bled through her clothes during her menstrual cycle because she was only allowed one toilet break between 5:45 a.m. and 6 p.m.

According to McCracken, other officers were able to obtain relief. DOC leadership eventually advised female staff to go through their sergeants to find toilet relief rather than going directly through other officers.

In July 2019, McCracken was fired for two reasons.

First, she had an inappropriate relationship with Erik Boaz, an offender she had known in school. McCracken said she first spoke with Boaz after having a panic attack at work, but requested a transfer to keep the relationship from moving forward.

McCracken was transferred, but Boaz was then transferred to his new drom. She claimed Pinkston did this on purpose to set her up.

The second issue that led to McCracken’s termination was his admission to trafficking suboxone in the correctional facility. McCracken later said she made a false confession so she could walk away from a meeting with an investigator, who she said would not let her go looking for her children without a confession.

In October 2019, after McCracken was fired, another policewoman reported an incident of sexual harassment in Pinkston. The lieutenant told him “not to go upstairs” and later told human resources that he was not at all aware of the incident.

Later, however, Pinkston admitted that he was aware of the employee’s report. He was then demoted from lieutenant to officer.

“All in all, the incidents began just weeks after McCracken started with IDOC and continued until his dismissal almost two years later, sometimes with uneventful periods,” Sweeney wrote. “The seriousness of the incidents ranged from offensive language to non-consensual physical contact, and perpetrators ranged from fellow officers to the director. “

In dismissing the state’s motion for summary judgment over McCracken’s sexual harassment complaint, Sweeney found “sufficient evidence to raise a real question as to whether she was subjected to harassment severe enough or widespread enough to change the conditions. employment conditions and create a hostile working environment. He added, however, that some of the incidents – such as the discipline-related delay in his training – could not be considered sexual harassment.

The court also found that the state had no right to rule on the issue of employer’s liability in relation to Pinkston and Warden Smith, nor on the issue of co-worker liability.

Likewise with respect to McCracken’s reprisal allegation, “(a) reasonable employee might stop filing complaints if she knew her supervisor would tell other employees that she had complained, would warn her male counterparts that” they couldn’t be alone with her and stared at her from across the room for almost an hour, ”Sweeney wrote. “… Considering all of the reprisals suffered by McCracken, a reasonable jury might find that they reached a level which would deter a reasonable employee from bringing or supporting a charge of discrimination.”

But the state got a judgment on the sex discrimination claim, with the court finding that “McCracken cannot show that she suffered adverse action and met IDOC’s legitimate expectations. in terms of employment… “. The judge specifically refused to find discrimination in McCracken’s transfer to another dorm, denial of leave, initial denial of training, disguised discharge and eventual dismissal.

Sweeney ordered the parties to meet with trial judge Mario Garcia to schedule a pre-trial settlement conference. Online court records show that a final pre-trial conference is scheduled for November 18.

The jury trial in the case of Amber McCracken v. Indiana State, 1: 19-cv-02290, is scheduled for December 6.


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