Sex Descrimination – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 22:25:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cflweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Sex Descrimination – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ 32 32 How Title IX Can Inform Private Employers’ Response to Relationship Violence | Spilman Thomas & Battle, LLC https://cflweb.org/how-title-ix-can-inform-private-employers-response-to-relationship-violence-spilman-thomas-battle-llc/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 22:25:33 +0000 https://cflweb.org/how-title-ix-can-inform-private-employers-response-to-relationship-violence-spilman-thomas-battle-llc/ How should an employer respond if an employee experiences relationship violence? What if the partner threatened the employee at work? Employers need to be aware of these situations, because relational violence in the workplace is more prevalent than it seems. According to statistics cited by the National Domestic Violence Hotline, 44% of full-time employed adults […]]]>

How should an employer respond if an employee experiences relationship violence? What if the partner threatened the employee at work?

Employers need to be aware of these situations, because relational violence in the workplace is more prevalent than it seems. According to statistics cited by the National Domestic Violence Hotline, 44% of full-time employed adults in the United States have reported domestic violence in their workplace, and 96% of employed domestic violence victims have encountered problems at work in the workplace. reason to abuse it. Relational violence poses a threat to any abused employee, as well as to co-workers and others who step in to help.

Educational institutions across the country — and their designated Title IX coordinators — routinely handle these types of situations. Examining the security measures employed in the context of Title IX can inform all employer actions to support employees and prevent workplace violence.

A. What is Title IX?
Title IX is a federal law that prohibits gender discrimination, including sexual harassment, in education programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. Prohibited sexual harassment includes sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.

Title IX coordinators oversee sexual discrimination/harassment reports and handle related issues. This article focuses on commonly employed campus safety supports and considerations in the context of Title IX as a potential resource/method for employers to address workplace violence issues.

B. Title IX Strategies and Resources
In responding to reports of relationship violence, Title IX coordinators implement supportive measures, including counseling, time extensions or other class-related adjustments, changes to work or class schedules, restrictions of contact between the parties, furloughs and enhanced security, among other things, to deter sexual harassment and to protect the safety of the parties involved and the campus environment. Parties are also informed about off-campus support services, how to report criminal behavior to the police and obtain civil protection orders, and safety planning.

Title IX coordinators also work with threat assessment teams such as security officers, human resource directors, and student affairs on campus security procedures. The measures employed include:

  • Restrict access to the campus by third parties;
  • Increase security patrols or law enforcement presence;
  • Obtain a photograph or physical description of the offender;
  • Receive a copy of the protective order obtained by a reporting party;
  • Development of an individualized safety plan;
  • provision of on-campus escort services;
  • Relocate housing or campus offices for enhanced security;
  • Use campus alert/notification systems to share emergency response protocols and campus-wide safety reminders (e.g., lock doors and windows, walk in well-lit areas, keep cell phone charged and available, add campus security numbers to speed dial, notify trusted friends of plans, use a buddy system when you go out);
  • Asking campus members to report suspicious activity to campus officials; and
  • Notify police of campus-related threats for investigation.

Schools also conduct Title IX training on relationship violence, learning about warning signs, and intervention strategies.

C. Relational Violence and the Workplace
Employers, like educational institutions, must be prepared—and, indeed, may be legally required—to respond when relationship violence hits the workplace. The Department of Labor (“DOL”) provides a business reason to prepare: Workplace violence has enormous costs, including lost productivity and morale, increased expenses for safety, personnel and worker compensation. workers, serious psychological consequences and loss of life.

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”), any act or threat of violence, harassment, bullying, or similar disruptive behavior that occurs in the workplace is workplace violence. work. Therefore, relationship violence that occurs at work is workplace violence. Employers regulated by OSHA must have a workplace violence prevention program that includes employee training and proper controls in place.
Employers can take advantage of the Title IX framework in their own workplaces, including:

  • Inform the employee of national and local support resources to request assistance. This may include services such as the National Domestic Violence Hotline or local resources such as family services and rape crisis centers that help survivors of domestic violence and assault obtain protective orders, a shelter, legal assistance, counseling and other services;
  • Ensure employees are aware of employer-sponsored employee assistance programs;
  • Become familiar with how to report incidents to law enforcement and how to obtain a Civil Protection Order;
  • Develop flexible policies for employees facing violence, including time off or time off to obtain a protective order or attend criminal proceedings, and provide for family and medical or sick leave, as appropriate, if an employee or a family member has been injured;
  • Developing a workplace safety plan for the employee, e.g. go out;
  • Identify methods and times to communicate safely with the employee outside of work;
  • Obtain a description or photograph of the offender for use by security or reception staff;
  • Form a Workplace Threat Assessment Team for supervisor review, assistance and awareness;
  • Engage or increase security patrols or law enforcement presence in or around the workplace;
  • Advise employees to report suspicious behavior to security or a designated official;
  • Train employees on workplace safety expectations, e.g. emergency response protocols that specify when and how to safely evacuate, hide in place, or take other measures for their protection;
  • Consult with risk management agents available through workplace violence insurance policies;
  • Report imminent threats to law enforcement for investigation; and
  • Maintain periodic check-ins with the employee regarding the status of the situation.

By implementing these types of safety measures, where appropriate, all employers can support their employees and discourage workplace violence caused by relationship violence.

D. Special State Laws for Employees Who Are Victims of Domestic Violence
Some states and localities have laws that protect employees who are victims of domestic violence. In North Carolina, employers with 15 or more employees must grant reasonable time off to apply for a domestic violence protection order. The law also allows employers to obtain no-contact orders on behalf of employees for unlawful contact made in the workplace.

Pennsylvania prohibits employers from retaliating against an employee for appearing in criminal court where the employee is a victim or witness to a crime or is a family member of the victim. The City of Philadelphia requires employers to grant employees leave to address domestic violence directed at employees or their families.

Many states and localities have also implemented paid sick and safety leave laws that apply to domestic violence and other forms of abuse, in addition to physical and mental health.

E. Conclusion
It is essential that employers have thought proactively about how to address workplace violence before an event occurs. Title IX provides a framework that employers can use to develop their own workplace violence prevention program. Employers seeking additional information on how to develop an effective workplace violence prevention program should consult their legal counsel.

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New South Wales budget to include $100m investment in women’s safety measures https://cflweb.org/new-south-wales-budget-to-include-100m-investment-in-womens-safety-measures/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 04:22:29 +0000 https://cflweb.org/new-south-wales-budget-to-include-100m-investment-in-womens-safety-measures/ The NSW Government has announced an investment of $100 million for women‘s safety in public places, at home and at work as part of next week’s Budget. The multi-faceted package is the latest in a series of budget announcements that focus on social issues across the state. It also follows calls from domestic violence service […]]]>

The NSW Government has announced an investment of $100 million for women‘s safety in public places, at home and at work as part of next week’s Budget.

The multi-faceted package is the latest in a series of budget announcements that focus on social issues across the state.

It also follows calls from domestic violence service providers for more support in the next state budget.

Here is what was promised.

stop street harassment

To keep women safe in public spaces after dark, the government will spend $30 million over two years to provide more street lighting and video surveillance in public parks, as well as improve pedestrian circulation.

The program will initially focus on Parramatta Park and The Rocks neighborhood in Sydney before expanding across the city and into regional areas, with further locations to be announced in the coming months.

It will also include a campaign against street harassment to change community attitudes.

“We are focused on listening to women and girls and delivering safer cities,” said Minister for Women’s Safety and Prevention of Domestic and Sexual Violence, Natalie Ward.

The security overhaul will include up to 10 pilot projects across the state.(ABC News: Lincoln Rothall)

Treasurer Matt Kean said too many women were afraid to walk around Sydney at night.

“I’ve heard too many stories of women taking the long way to avoid dark streets, or calling a friend while walking in case something goes wrong,” he said.

“When women walk home from work, they shouldn’t have to fear what lurks in the shadows.”

Make work safer

To tackle sexual harassment in the workplace, $4.8 million will be spent on a new task force administered by Safe Work NSW to ensure employers take action to stamp out employee harassment.

The working group will place particular emphasis on training and orientation in certain male-dominated industries.

“Safe work will focus on these high-risk workplaces,” said Fair Trade Minister Eleni Petinos.

“We know that sexual harassment is a problem in our workplaces…one in four women reported being sexually harassed in the past five years.”

a woman standing behind microphones
Fair Trade Minister Eleni Petinos said the task force will provide employers with advice on best practices.(ABC News)

The program will aim to hold more employers accountable if they fail to comply with their responsibilities to keep employees safe.

Ms Petinos said she would follow up on Australia’s Sex Discrimination Commissioner Kate Jenkins‘ 2019 Respect in the Workplace report, which found workplace harassment was both widespread and pervasive.

Support victims of domestic violence

The government has also allocated $69 million to a project called Safer Pathways which will provide more integrated support systems for victims of domestic violence.

“We continue to make our justice fairer, less traumatic, faster and less costly for all participants, especially victim-survivors of D and sexual violence,” Attorney General Mark Speakman said.

The investment will provide more case management services to victim survivors and improve the database used by police to refer people to support services.

Audio-visual link facilities in around 50 NSW courts and tribunals will also be extended to allow victim-survivors to testify remotely, minimizing trauma.

Court-appointed officers will also be trained to cross-examine survivors, after laws passed last year that prevent unrepresented defendants from interviewing domestic violence complainants.

Job , updated

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Biden announces executive actions targeting anti-LGBTQ laws https://cflweb.org/biden-announces-executive-actions-targeting-anti-lgbtq-laws/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 04:08:39 +0000 https://cflweb.org/biden-announces-executive-actions-targeting-anti-lgbtq-laws/ President Biden announced several executive actions on Wednesday afternoon to address discriminatory laws and practices against LGBTQ children and adults, as a number of states enact anti-LGBTQ measures. ‘The message is simple: Pride is back in the White House,’ Mr Biden told the White House Pride event where the actions of the executive were exposed. […]]]>

President Biden announced several executive actions on Wednesday afternoon to address discriminatory laws and practices against LGBTQ children and adults, as a number of states enact anti-LGBTQ measures.

‘The message is simple: Pride is back in the White House,’ Mr Biden told the White House Pride event where the actions of the executive were exposed.

President Joe Biden signs an executive order on advancing equality for LGBTQI+ people during a Pride event at the White House, June 15, 2022.

Getty Images

They direct the Department of Health and Human Services to work with states to expand gender-affirming care and access to mental health counseling for youth, strengthen protections against discrimination in the foster care system, and clarify that federally funded programs cannot provide “conversion therapy” the widely discredited practice of trying to change someone’s sexual orientation or gender identity.

“My order will use the full force of the federal government to prevent the inhumane practices of conversion therapy,” Biden said. “This is the first time the federal government has used a coordinated response against this dangerous and discredited practice.”

A senior administration official who described the measures did not indicate any specific use of federal funds for conversion therapy, but said the executive action will help HHS attorneys enforce any future attempts. .

HHS will also be responsible for issuing “new policy examples for states on how to expand access to comprehensive health care” for LGBTQ patients, the official said. The Ministry of Education will also be responsible for issuing a “full inclusion” policy in schools.

On his first day in office, Mr Biden issued an executive order stating that gay and transgender people are protected from discrimination in school, work and other areas. He called on federal agencies to review existing policies and regulations that prohibit sex discrimination and amend them as needed to emphasize that sex discrimination includes sexual orientation and gender identity.

LGBTQ rights, particularly for transgender children and teens, have been a focus for Republican lawmakers, with states proposing to limit participation in sports, as well as discussions of gender identity and sexual orientation in states. classroom.

Sean Conlon contributed reporting.

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Senior living operator agrees to settle landmark transgender discrimination case https://cflweb.org/senior-living-operator-agrees-to-settle-landmark-transgender-discrimination-case/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 04:15:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/senior-living-operator-agrees-to-settle-landmark-transgender-discrimination-case/ Transgender flag. (Credit: Vladimir Vladimirov/Getty Images) A Maine seniors’ residence operator will adopt a comprehensive non-discrimination policy and provide cultural competency training to staff members under a settlement in the nation’s first known discrimination case filed by a transgender adult. against a long-term care community. Adult Family Care Homes of Maine has reached a settlement […]]]>
Transgender flag. (Credit: Vladimir Vladimirov/Getty Images)

A Maine seniors’ residence operator will adopt a comprehensive non-discrimination policy and provide cultural competency training to staff members under a settlement in the nation’s first known discrimination case filed by a transgender adult. against a long-term care community.

Adult Family Care Homes of Maine has reached a settlement with the Maine Human Rights Commission after one of its communities – Sunrise Assisted Living in Jonesport, ME – was found guilty of violating protections of non- state discrimination in denying Marie King, a transgender woman, a room due to her sexual orientation.

John Hamer, an attorney representing Sunrise, said the community “is pleased to be working with GLAD [GLBTQ Legal Advocates & Defenders] improve its policies and procedures to ensure it provides a welcoming environment” for all members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community.

Hamer described the situation with King as “miscommunication.” The complaint, he said, was based on a short conversation between a social worker and a Sunrise employee. He said King never applied for residency.

“The social worker had a short conversation with Sunrise Assisted Living where Ms. King was discussed, and the question was raised of what would happen if Ms. King was assigned to share a room with someone who was not home. comfortable having a transgender roommate,” Hamer shared in a statement to McKnight Senior Residence, adding that the social worker inferred that Sunrise would not be a suitable place for King. “However, Sunrise Assisted Living would not have denied Ms. King residency based on her transgender status had she applied for residency.”

Hamer said Sunrise is “pleased to work with GLAD to improve its existing policies and provide training to ensure such miscommunication doesn’t happen again.”

In a joint statement, Adult Family Care Homes of Maine and GLAD expressed their hope that the positive resolution “will lead long-term care facilities across the country to adopt policies that ensure that transgender seniors, indeed all people elderly, will be treated with dignity and respect.”

In addition to SAGECare’s policy and employee training, the company will also post a transgender non-discrimination statement on its website.

“SAGECare, which has trained more than 100,000 long-term care facility staff across the country in LGBTQ+ cultural competency, will give AFCH the tools it needs to create more inclusive and welcoming communities. “Aaron Tax, director of advocacy at LGBT Elder Advocacy and service organization SAGE, says McKnight Senior Residence.

AFCH operates Sunrise and eight other senior communities in the state. The Maine Human Rights Commission said in March it found evidence of violations of the state’s non-discrimination protections when Sunrise denied King a room as a transgender woman.

As McKnight Senior Residence previously reported, GLAD filed a complaint with the commission on behalf of the woman last fall.

GLAD attorney Chris Erchull said the settlement resolves the “profound harm” King suffered by “being turned away because of who she is.”

“Anyone who needs access to a long-term care facility, including transgender people, should be welcomed with dignity, compassion and respect,” Erchull said in a statement. “The Model Transgender Non-Discrimination Policy and Public Statement Encompassing Transgender Residents provides a clear example of how these facilities can and should operate with respect to transgender seniors.”

GLAD said the US Department of Health and Human Services is still investigating whether Sunrise violated the sex discrimination provisions of the Affordable Care Act.

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Show or Tell: A Roadmap for Board Diversity Laws https://cflweb.org/show-or-tell-a-roadmap-for-board-diversity-laws/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 08:10:49 +0000 https://cflweb.org/show-or-tell-a-roadmap-for-board-diversity-laws/ It now appears — at least until the call dust settles — that California’s statutory efforts to mandate board seats for women and people from underrepresented communities are on hold. The recent defeats that two trial courts inflicted on California suggest that the time may be right to rethink (and possibly reframe) statutory diversity efforts […]]]>

It now appears — at least until the call dust settles — that California’s statutory efforts to mandate board seats for women and people from underrepresented communities are on hold.

The recent defeats that two trial courts inflicted on California suggest that the time may be right to rethink (and possibly reframe) statutory diversity efforts of boards of directors to focus on disclosure, not on warrants. The first ruling, on April 1, dealt with California law mandating corporate board seats for underrepresented communities, while the second ruling, on May 13, dealt with the state’s historic requirement that which company boards include women.

Both California courts rejected evidence supporting the state’s board diversity mandates. While the procedural paths of these decisions differed slightly, their legal premises rested on the same failure of the state to prove that these laws were narrowly tailored to address specific harms that the state had a compelling interest in addressing.

In summary, both courts found that California had failed to meet its burden of proof to justify state-imposed penalties for missing statutory gender and race milestones for corporate boards. public.

While the state has indicated it intends to appeal the May 13 ruling reversing the gender mandate, it faces a high bar on appeal. Now is the time to seek a statutory solution to inclusive representation on the board of directors that will stand up to legal challenges. A starting point for a solution can be found in long-standing precedents requiring transparency and disclosure rather than the imposition of penalties for failing to achieve representation goals set by law.

The EEO model

The notion of diversity disclosure is not new. In 1966, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission adopted the mandatory diversity report for employers of 100 or more as a method of collecting data to understand the extent and impact of discrimination. in employment.

The EEO-1 reporting mandate has gone largely unchallenged (except for recent legal skirmishes over the reporting of salary data). The report asks employers to identify racial, ethnic and gender categories for each employee.

This requirement goes far beyond the small group of 3,000 Russell Companies (the top 3,000 publicly traded U.S. companies ranked by market capitalization) that represent most public companies in the United States — nearly 75,000 employers representing 56 million employees filed EEO-1 reports in 2018 alone, the last year for which this data is available.

The SEC-Nasdaq approach

More than a decade ago, the SEC passed a rule requiring issuers to disclose the impact of diversity on the board nomination process. This rule directs boards to address diversity as one of many important factors in board selection, such as board members with disparate viewpoints, professional experience, education, skills and backgrounds. other qualities and attributes, including sex, race and national origin.

These nominating committee disclosures for candidate identification and evaluation and board renewal policies have generally never been seriously challenged or significantly changed, at least until the rule of Nasdaq 2021 diversity goes into effect this year.

Based on Model EEO-1 and in accordance with SEC disclosure rules, effective August 8 (or the date the issuer’s 2022 proxy is filed, whichever is later), Nasdaq issuers must file an initial board matrix indicating the diversity composition of the issuer’s board of directors. via a Nasdaq model. The rule also requires (after a transition period) that issuers explain whether they have at least two different directors and, if not, why.

This “show or tell” rule is not a warrant. Issuers that fail to provide or achieve stated diversity goals may choose to explain the unmet goals in a proxy statement or through public disclosures. The Nasdaq rule is the subject of an ongoing lawsuit challenging the authority of the SEC to implement the rule.

Other Model State Laws

Several states, such as Washington, Illinois and New York, have enacted laws similar to the EEO-1 and Nasdaq show or tell rules, requiring mandatory reporting of board representation.

While Washington law on its face requires a specific percentage of female board members, no penalties are imposed for compliance failures. In fact, the Washington law works like the Nasdaq initiative in requiring transparent reporting through a board diversity discussion and analysis that provides board diversity composition, information on proposed nominees and other board refresh disclosures.

These disclosure templates are solidly designed to withstand legal challenges, because instead of warrants for statutorily protected classifications that trigger in-depth constitutional analyses, the reporting templates are administrative vehicles of transparency, similar to reports. financials inform shareholders about whether a company is achieving its financial and other goals.

Show or tell meets ESG objectives

Inclusive board representation is not just good governance, it reflects the principles of deliberate and transparent governance that stakeholders demand – key foundations of the ESG movement. Transparent diversity information, although not monetary, can be important to the company’s mission. Board refresh practices involve the movement toward a focus on social justice, community representation, and value (including the monetary value of increased shareholder returns and corporate profits) that diverse representation brings to boards.

A “show or tell” method ultimately meets important ESG requirements for meaningful governance processes. In sum, statutory governance initiatives could enable more inclusive board representation if they legally aim to transparently inform shareholders that boards reflect the communities the companies serve.

This article does not necessarily reflect the views of the Bureau of National Affairs, Inc., publisher of Bloomberg Law and Bloomberg Tax, or its owners.

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Author Information

jen rubin is a member of Mintz, practicing bicoastal labor law. She is chair of the company’s ESG practice group.

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Bellefonte woman files federal lawsuit against Penn State https://cflweb.org/bellefonte-woman-files-federal-lawsuit-against-penn-state/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/bellefonte-woman-files-federal-lawsuit-against-penn-state/ A Bellefonte-area woman filed a federal lawsuit last week against Penn State, alleging the university’s former office of ethics and compliance chief discriminated against men and retaliated against her after reporting the allegations. Denise Shivery has claimed she and other employees were ousted after filing complaints against former ethics and compliance officer Kenya Mann Faulker. […]]]>

A Bellefonte-area woman filed a federal lawsuit last week against Penn State, alleging the university’s former office of ethics and compliance chief discriminated against men and retaliated against her after reporting the allegations.

Denise Shivery has claimed she and other employees were ousted after filing complaints against former ethics and compliance officer Kenya Mann Faulker.

Faulker, who left college in March 2021 and was hired in November to take the same position at Emory University, was not listed as a defendant in the lawsuit. Penn State declined to comment through a spokesperson on Friday.

Shivery, who was hired in 2014 and worked as a compliance specialist before being fired, alleged that Faulker treated men in a “more hostile, humiliating and dismissive manner than she treated female employees”.

The university conducted an investigation, Shivery’s attorneys Stephen Console and Rahul Munshi wrote in the 36-page lawsuit, which found “no evidence of retaliation against her.”

David Gray, the university’s former vice president of finance and business, told a staff meeting that the two women had to “push the reset button,” according to the lawsuit. Shivery said she was not interviewed as part of the investigation.

The university, Shivery’s lawyers wrote, told her she was terminated due to restructuring. Shivery applied for two dozen other jobs, her attorneys wrote, but was not selected for any of the positions.

Shivery accused the university of violating federal and state laws that prohibit employment discrimination based on gender. She seeks unspecified damages.

The office that Faulker headed was created as part of the university’s response to the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal. The department is responsible for ensuring compliance with all laws, as well as policies and guidelines.

Before coming to Happy Valley, Faulker worked as an inspector general in the administration of former Governor Tom Corbett. She also served as the first integrity officer for the state Treasury Department.

Penn State has yet to file a response to the lawsuit.

Bret Pallotto primarily reports on courts and crime for the Center Daily Times. He grew up in Mifflin County and graduated from Lock Haven University.

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State bills to outlaw LGBTQ discrimination have bipartisan support https://cflweb.org/state-bills-to-outlaw-lgbtq-discrimination-have-bipartisan-support/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 22:27:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/state-bills-to-outlaw-lgbtq-discrimination-have-bipartisan-support/ COLUMBUS, Ohio — As the state continually proposes legislation that LGBTQ+ advocates say is discriminatory, a bipartisan group of lawmakers are challenging those bills and trying to push forward Ohio’s equity law. Just a week after Republican lawmakers passed a bill that would require genital inspections for any female high school or college athlete who […]]]>

COLUMBUS, Ohio — As the state continually proposes legislation that LGBTQ+ advocates say is discriminatory, a bipartisan group of lawmakers are challenging those bills and trying to push forward Ohio’s equity law.

Just a week after Republican lawmakers passed a bill that would require genital inspections for any female high school or college athlete who is “accused” or “suspected” of being transgender, reaction to the bill has brought Ohio and News 5 coverage to the spotlight on cable news networks, late night talk show circuits and national newspapers.

Ohio is one of nearly 30 states without protections against LGBT discrimination, according to data collected by Freedom for All Americans. This means that it is technically legal in most parts of the state to discriminate against someone based on their sexual orientation or gender identity or expression.

“Ohio needs to go in a different direction than what we’re going right now,” said State Sen. Nickie Antonio, a Democrat from Lakewood. “These kinds of bills that are hateful and set us back are not going to be the kinds of policies that make people want to come here, raise a family, put down roots.”

The Northeast Ohio Democrat is the only openly gay lawmaker, and she said now is the time to introduce laws that welcome people into the state.

“Depriving us of the full depth and breadth of protections and equality for no reason other than who we are and who we love is not right,” she added.

The Ohio Fairness Act is not new. It has been presented at every General Assembly for at least 20 years, this time making the 10th attempt – six of the 10 are by Antonio.

There is more support this time.

Senate Bill 119 and its counterpart, House Bill 208, are currently pending, stalled in committee. The Senate version was presented by Antonio and State Senator Michael Rulli, a Republican from Salem; the House version by state Representatives Michael Skindell, a Democrat from Lakewood, and Brett Hillyer, a Republican from Uhrichsville.

“It offers protections in housing, employment and in the public sphere, Antonio said.

In a 5-4 decision in June 2015, the United States Supreme Court said that all states must allow same-sex marriages and recognize same-sex marriages, whether they took place inside or outside of the state.

Three years later, SCOTUS sided with a Colorado baker who refused to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple, citing the First Amendment allowing him to refuse the couple, based on their religious beliefs.

“It’s a law for public accommodations, but there’s nothing fair about a bill that will end up discriminating in the name of discrimination against millions of Ohioans and their opinions,” said Linda Harvey, ultra-conservative Mission America activist.

Colorado baker Jack Phillips has been targeted by cancel culture for having his own opinions, she said.

“What happens is: you have to make the cake, you have to make the flowers for the wedding, you have to take the picture, you have to print the flyer announcing the Drag Queen story time,” a she added, sharing her thoughts on the LGBTQ+ perspective. is. “Or we will bully your business, we will publicly shame you.”

“Cancel culture” is when someone is challenged, and sometimes punished, for what is perceived as “problematic” behavior.

“The LGBTQ movement and the Equity Act want to try to position this as something fair,” Harvey said. “It’s totally discriminatory and, in some ways, frankly, fascist.”

Asked by News 5’s Morgan Trau what was fascist about it, she cited the “reframing of language” in the constitution to include gay people in non-discrimination laws.

“[Lawmakers are] give that level of influence to the misbehaving LGBTQ movement,” she added. They want to redefine the language as it currently exists in Ohio law so that sex discrimination, wherever sex discrimination appears, it will magically mean that there is a defense of homosexual behaviors and confusion of genres.

Freedom of religion was one of Harvey’s most important points.

“You’re asking people to be coerced into violating some of the deepest expressions of sexual morality in our faith,” Harvey said. “Mandatory speech has never been an American value, and I don’t think it’s a value in Ohio, and I don’t think it’s a value that helps businesses. It forces mandatory acceptance of behaviors that people may not approve of.”

The law could lead to more lawsuits, she added.

“I don’t have any evidence of that, but it does appear that some of the incidents across the country – the baking of the cakes and all that – were carefully engineered to provoke their excuse for a trial,” the curator said.

She didn’t have statistics to prove that cities in states that have LGBT non-discrimination ordinances have more lawsuits.

Harvey also spoke out in favor of the Save Women‘s Sports Act, which passed the Ohio House by putting the language into an entirely different bill at the last minute.

Antonio couldn’t disagree more.

“All of these bills, I think are dog whistles,” the Democrat said. “It creates a very hateful and bigoted situation.”

The Legislator refers to numerous bills, including but not limited to:

The Save Women’s Sports Act, HB 151/61, which would prohibit transgender girls and women from participating in sports with cisgender girls and women. The bill also requires genital inspections for anyone “suspected” of being trans.

RELATED: Ohio GOP Passes Bill to Root Out ‘Suspected’ Transgender Female Athletes Through Genital Inspection

Save Adolescents From Experimentation (SAFE) Act, HB 454, which would ban gender-affirming care for LGBTQ+ minors. This includes hormone blockers, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), surgery and possibly mental health services.

RELATED: Fact Check on Gender-Affirming Care

Divive Concepts or the “Both Sides” bill, HB 327 and 322, which would prevent schools from teaching on arbitrary “controversial topics”. The bill’s sponsor told News 5 it means the Holocaust will be taught from “both sides,” including from the perspective of “German soldiers.”

RELATED: Rep.’s Holocaust Comments Sponsoring ‘Divisive Concepts’ Bill Raises Concerns

Ohio’s version of Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay, Don’t Say Race” bill, as educators, activists, and Democrats call it, because it uses the same language in Divisive Concepts but explicitly states to control and curb discussion of sexuality or gender in schools.

RELATED: Lawmakers Hear Ohio’s Version of Florida’s ‘Don’t Say Gay’ Bill

“Do we want to bring Ohio back upside down and into a superstitious, old-fashioned world, demonizing a small group of people who need our care and support, not our hate and bigotry?” asked Anthony. “Or do we mean, let’s be reasonable people.”

When it comes to the transgender athlete bill, Senate Speaker Matt Huffman, a Republican from Lima, seemed to cautiously take the middle ground.

“I would love to have audiences on this and not drag it under the door as everyone walks out and says, ‘Why haven’t you done anything? ‘” Huffman said. “The problem, I would like to deal with and solve by the end of the year, and whether it is through Bill 151 or by a Senate bill or some other vehicle, I don’t know.”

The chair goes on to say that there is a fundamental fairness issue that needs to be addressed.

“I’m certainly sensitive to what the bill is trying to do,” he added. “I’m also sympathetic to people it may affect.”

Like all of these issues, he said, there are nuances and that’s why “moving floor amendments in unrelated bills are a bad way to do business.”

As for the language on genital inspection, Huffman said he had no opinion on that, because it’s not his specialty.

It’s the kind of stuff you need to sit on, you have testimonials, you work out the details, you talk to experts,” he added. And in all honesty, me trying to answer this question is exactly what I’m criticizing others to do, which is to just go ahead and vote – you really don’t know exactly how this is all going happen.”

None of the bills will be heard again until the fall.

Follow WEWS State House Reporter Morgan Trau on Twitter and Facebook.

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It’s not a boys’ club anymore. But there’s more to do inside Parliament https://cflweb.org/its-not-a-boys-club-anymore-but-theres-more-to-do-inside-parliament/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 01:40:06 +0000 https://cflweb.org/its-not-a-boys-club-anymore-but-theres-more-to-do-inside-parliament/ Australia has nearly achieved gender parity in parliament, with women making up 43% of the majority Labor government. It’s a refreshing change after so many years of Scott Morrison lies, broken promises and a government that protects men at all costs. But a different government doesn’t necessarily mean a different parliament, and just having more […]]]>

Australia has nearly achieved gender parity in parliament, with women making up 43% of the majority Labor government. It’s a refreshing change after so many years of Scott Morrison lies, broken promises and a government that protects men at all costs.

But a different government doesn’t necessarily mean a different parliament, and just having more women in the mix doesn’t guarantee a less toxic culture.

This three-part series will explore exactly what needs to change in parliament (and whose responsibility it is to change it), why change will be slow in coming, and how parliament should be the leading example of modern workplaces that are fair to people. sexes.

Major changes to watch

Parliamentary Culture Review by Gender Discrimination Commissioner Kate Jenkins, Set the standard, painted a picture of a toxic and dangerous workplace with limited liability for abusers. It found that 37% of people had experienced some form of bullying, one in three some form of sexual harassment and 1% actual or attempted sexual assault.

The review made 28 recommendations, some of which have already been implemented, including the creation of an independent parliamentary standards commission to respond to complaints, training in best practices for MPs and an acknowledgment of abuse and harassment in the within Parliament.

Along with implementing all of Jenkins’ recommendations, Labor has also agreed to implement all 55 recommendations of Jenkins’ wider report on Australian workplaces, ‘Respect@Work’.

Here’s what else to look for:

  • A positive duty of care in all Australian workplaces to prevent sexual discrimination and harassment, as recommended in the Respect@Work report
  • A code of conduct for parliamentarians and staff, established by the Standing Joint Committee on Parliamentary Standards
  • Diversity objectives and public communication of the characteristics of diversity among parliamentarians and staff
  • No more late-night votes or extended working hours following the revision of the agenda
  • No more insults, abusive, sexist or discriminatory comments used in parliamentary chambers (including Question Time) imposed by Speakers
  • Complaints — current and past — will be handled by the Parliamentary Workplace Support Service.

A good first step towards a diverse Parliament

Parliament’s lack of diversity, Jenkins found, meant that other groups were marginalized and vulnerable to misconduct, discrimination, intimidation and assault. The 47th Legislature has a record number of female politicians, Indigenous and Independent, with four new First Nations representatives and three new Independents.

Although the overhaul of parliamentary workplaces is not in the job descriptions of newly elected women, Blair Williams, senior lecturer at the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership at the Australian National University (ANU) Crikey it’s a good first step.

“It’s not just the group of pale, stale men and I think that will bring about change. It’s eroding this boys club — especially this liberal boys club — that we’ve seen in politics for some time,” says -she.

Despite the diversity of this Parliament, she said, more needs to be done: “The Coalition is massively [gender parity] back – the level of female representation has not changed and they need to do something.

Parliament should introduce diversity targets and publish public reports on its characteristics – which will highlight where it is falling behind and whether representation extends to staff members.

As Sonia Palmieri, Gender Policy Fellow at ANU, tells Crikey, the new, more diverse Parliament is “a first but really just a first step towards cultural change”.

A respectful work environment with regular hours

While it is still a majority government, with fewer politicians representing the two main parties, it is hoped that the protection racket seen during the Coalition’s nine-year rule will be halted.

Palmieri thinks fewer career politicians and more independents coming from a wide range of work backgrounds mean mediocre behavior previously ignored as “the norm” will not be tolerated.

“They come from workplaces that don’t expect to see bullying and harassment as some kind of norm, which we’ve seen over the past two decades, she says.

“They come from workplaces where accountability is now built in, so they are the ones who are going to hold Parliament to account [and] anchor new norms, rules and expectations.

Much of Parliament’s cultural problems stem from staff feeling isolated after flying to Canberra, working long hours in a ‘work hard, play hard’ culture fueled by excessive drinking and the unpredictability of working hours.

The Standing Joint Committee on Parliamentary Standards is tasked with reviewing working hours, alcohol policies and the code of conduct – but it remains to be seen how well these will be enforced.

“What we’d really like to see is a different workplace for members as well, and it really comes down to the hours, which then set the tone for things like drinking and mid-level dinners and parties. work,” says Palmieri.

“It’s about Parliament accepting that it doesn’t need to function as this one-stop-shop because everyone has to fly in and maximize the time they’re there. We now have many different ways of working as we have come to understand over the past two years.

An example-based approach

The election showed that Australians had had enough of politicians’ combative approach and were looking for a softer style of leadership.

The executive chair of the McKell Institute in Queensland, Rachel Nolan – who is a former Labor MP for Queensland – thinks Albanese’s leadership style will have a huge impact on how other MPs behave – more so, she said, that the modification of working hours.

“Just because you work long hours doesn’t mean there has to be a culture associated with it,” she says.

The addition of a ‘critical mass’ of women, coupled with Albanese’s style of leadership, will make Parliament ‘a more inclusive and thoughtful place’.

“The leader is absolutely setting the tone…it’s likely that the nature of parliamentary debate will change,” she said.

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Pamplin Media Group – Poll: Oregonians divided over Title IX laws for trans students https://cflweb.org/pamplin-media-group-poll-oregonians-divided-over-title-ix-laws-for-trans-students/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/pamplin-media-group-poll-oregonians-divided-over-title-ix-laws-for-trans-students/ Oregon Values ​​& Beliefs Center survey shows research does little to influence public opinion on bathroom access or sports As the nation marks the start of LGBTQ+ Pride Month and 50 years since the implementation of Title IX, a recent statewide poll shows most Oregonians say they support protection gay and transgender students. Yet they […]]]>

Oregon Values ​​& Beliefs Center survey shows research does little to influence public opinion on bathroom access or sports

As the nation marks the start of LGBTQ+ Pride Month and 50 years since the implementation of Title IX, a recent statewide poll shows most Oregonians say they support protection gay and transgender students. Yet they are split on whether trans students should be able to participate in school sports that match their gender identity.

Title IX is the federal law that prohibits discrimination in federally funded schools and programs and requires equal participation opportunities regardless of gender. Historically, Title IX has helped ensure that schools provide equal sports facilities and practice time for boys and girls. PMG PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER KEIZUR -- Asked about a Title IX complaint filed in 2021, Gresham softball coach Jim Gardenhire said softball and baseball were woefully ignored by the school district.

According to an Oregon Values ​​& Beliefs Center survey conducted in May, 64% of respondents agree with the latest interpretation of federal law, which extends protections to transgender students, but significantly fewer agree. with the full scope of the law.

Polling data shows that 41% of 1,674 participants said trans students should be allowed to play on sports teams that match their gender identity, but 39% said they should only be allowed to play. in teams that match their sex at birth. Another 21% said they had no opinion or didn’t know.

The OVBC noted that a plurality of women support the gender affirmation policy, while men were primarily the group that said trans students should compete based on their birth sex.

Trans issues follow political lines, with 62% of Democrats supporting trans students being allowed to play on sports teams that match their gender identity and 74% of Republicans supporting restrictions on trans students playing on teams that match their gender of birth.

The nonprofit public opinion research group also noted that those more familiar with Title IX tended to support allowing trans students to compete based on their gender identity. The OVBC notes that the high percentage of uncertain responses suggests this is an “emerging problem and opinions are still shaped by the media and opinion leaders.”

Last year, in response to several states attempting to enact legislation effectively banning transgender women from participating in women’s sports, the U.S. Department of Education released guidance on federal law, noting a court ruling Supreme Court of the United States in 2020 in Bostock v. the basis for its interpretation.

In a federal memo, the administration noted that the Civil Rights Office “has long recognized that Title IX protects all students — including lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students — from harassment and other forms of gender discrimination. OCR has also long recognized that Title IX prohibits harassment and other forms of discrimination against all students who do not conform to stereotypical notions of masculinity and femininity,” indicates the memo.

Neither the federal guidelines, nor the research that shows transgender and non-binary students are less at risk for mental health issues and suicidal thoughts when schools affirm their gender identity, seem to sway public opinion much.

When asked if knowing that studies link the treatment of trans youth in schools to mental health and suicidality, 85% of respondents said they felt the same, that trans students should only be allowed to play on sports teams that match their sex at birth. Another 13% said they were less certain of their opinion after seeing the research and another 2% said they had changed their mind.

Similarly, 50% of respondents said transgender students should be able to use restrooms that match their current gender identity; 30% disagreed and 20% skipped the question or had no opinion.

When told that studies show that preventing trans students from accessing restrooms that match their gender identity is associated with harmful mental health indicators, including suicide, 88% of the 504 people who respondents said they had not changed their minds. Another 10% felt less sure about restricting toilet access and 2% said they had changed their minds.

Oregon Center for Values ​​and Beliefs Methodology

The survey was conducted online among Oregonians 18 and older from professionally run online panels. The polling group said its surveys fall within the statistically valid margin of error.

The nonprofit constitutes a broad research panel of Oregonians to ensure that all voices are represented in public policy discussions in a valid and statistically reliable way.

Selected panelists earn points for their participation, which can be redeemed for cash or donated to charity. To learn more, click here.


You rely on us to stay informed and we rely on you to fund our efforts. Quality local journalism takes time and money. Please support us to protect the future of community journalism.

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Menopause-related discrimination cases rise in UK employment courts https://cflweb.org/menopause-related-discrimination-cases-rise-in-uk-employment-courts/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 08:54:10 +0000 https://cflweb.org/menopause-related-discrimination-cases-rise-in-uk-employment-courts/ Menopause cases in UK employment tribunals are on the rise, with more workers willing to challenge companies that fail to recognize women‘s health needs. Labor courts involving menopause rose 44% in 2021, with 23 cases referring to it compared to 16 the previous year, according to analysis of court data by the Menopause Experts Group, […]]]>

Menopause cases in UK employment tribunals are on the rise, with more workers willing to challenge companies that fail to recognize women‘s health needs.

Labor courts involving menopause rose 44% in 2021, with 23 cases referring to it compared to 16 the previous year, according to analysis of court data by the Menopause Experts Group, a group that provides education services. about menopause and information to help women manage their symptoms. The word menopause mentioned in other cases, not only involving it, also increased by 75%, according to the data.

Women can bring menopause-related claims for age or sex discrimination under the UK Equality Act 2010. As court cases mount, the UK government is set to publish the results of an inquiry into discrimination against postmenopausal women in the workplace, which could recommend workplaces put in place menopause policies . The natural phenomenon can cause symptoms such as hot flashes, sleep loss and mood swings, with the symptoms being debilitating for some.

“Too many policies don’t consider the needs of women, and more and more employees are showing they’re happy to stand up for themselves,” said Dee Murray, founder and CEO of Menopause Experts Group. “Lack of education is dangerous to women’s health and unfair to their careers.”

The labor dispute data follows a survey published earlier this year showing that nearly a fifth of the female workforce experiencing menopause is considering quitting their job.

Photograph: A morning commuter on London Bridge heads into the City of London, UK, Tuesday January 18, 2022. Photo credit: Hollie Adams/Bloomberg.

Copyright 2022 Bloomberg.

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