Sex Descrimination – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 03:20:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://cflweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Sex Descrimination – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ 32 32 KSHSAA’s Cheryl Gleason dedicates 45 years to sports in Kansas https://cflweb.org/kshsaas-cheryl-gleason-dedicates-45-years-to-sports-in-kansas/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 03:20:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/kshsaas-cheryl-gleason-dedicates-45-years-to-sports-in-kansas/ On June 23, 1972, President Nixon enacted Title IX, prohibiting gender discrimination in educational institutions that receive federal funding. Title IX was widely seen as the springboard for high school and college women‘s sports to get to where they are today, but the fight for equality is far from over. Every Thursday night at 10 […]]]>

On June 23, 1972, President Nixon enacted Title IX, prohibiting gender discrimination in educational institutions that receive federal funding. Title IX was widely seen as the springboard for high school and college women‘s sports to get to where they are today, but the fight for equality is far from over. Every Thursday night at 10 p.m. before the 50th anniversary of the law’s passage, 13 Sports will honor the game-changing women for women’s and women’s sports in Kansas.

“IX at 50: the pioneers of women’s sport in Kansas”

TOPEKA, Kansas (WIBW) – Cheryl Gleason spent 45 years in Kansas as a teacher, coach and administrator.

“I love sports and I love the value of sports, Gleason said. “I learned a lot from that, you know winning isn’t everything. There is a lot to be learned from losing. I love kids and wanted to teach so it was a pretty easy decision for me to want to do this.

She spent the first 13 years as a coach at Osawatomie and Caldwell, then joined the Kansas State High School Activities Association in 1989 – while using the sport as a way to teach life lessons to the next generation.

“They learn to be a little more assertive, they learn to be a lot more confident and sure of themselves,” Gleason said. “They learn that when you make mistakes, everything is fine. You get up and continue again.

For 32 years, Gleason has served as an administrator for gymnastics, volleyball, bowling, tennis, swimming, diving and golf. She also oversaw the KSHSAA Hall of Fame and was the State Director of the Kansas Association for Youth Program, or KAY.

Gleason has been involved with KAY since his first year of high school. To date, she is the only KAY alumnus to have spent 50 years at KAY Leadership Camp.

“The KAY program was really special to me,” she said. “Always is and always will be. “

Gleason retired from KSHSAA in July 2021.

By the time she left, women’s sport had taken giant strides since her high school years, when only tennis was offered.

“When I started teaching and coaching and the girls said, ‘I don’t want to go out, or I don’t want to do that,’ I looked at them and said, ‘You will be working the rest of your life but being in high school activities when you graduate from high school you are now alone. You only have one chance. And I was not that lucky, ”she said. “Don’t give up on this wonderful opportunity to learn, grow and have fun with your peers. It’s not just about winning. It’s not just about being the person on the pitch who scores the most points. There is more to the sport itself.

Gleason will soon be enshrined in the halls of the building she has spent so many years serving, as a member of the 2022 Class of the KSHSAA Hall of Fame.

“I have had an amazing career,” said Gleason. “If I had to do it again, I wouldn’t have changed anything. I like sports. I like to teach. I like to try to inspire young people to be the best of themselves. And I wouldn’t want it any other way.

Gleason was also previously inducted into the Kansas Volleyball Association Hall of Fame and Southwestern College Hall of Fame.

Copyright 2021 WIBW. All rights reserved.


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Sarah Weddington’s legacy includes mentoring feminist leaders in Texas https://cflweb.org/sarah-weddingtons-legacy-includes-mentoring-feminist-leaders-in-texas/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 11:07:41 +0000 https://cflweb.org/sarah-weddingtons-legacy-includes-mentoring-feminist-leaders-in-texas/ Farah Diaz-Tello was a student at the University of Texas at Austin when she heard about a course on gender discrimination open to undergraduates and aligned with her interests. The course, Diaz-Tello recalls, was “chronically oversubscribed.” And, at the time, she did not really know the beginning of the career of her instructor, Sarah Weddington, […]]]>

Farah Diaz-Tello was a student at the University of Texas at Austin when she heard about a course on gender discrimination open to undergraduates and aligned with her interests.

The course, Diaz-Tello recalls, was “chronically oversubscribed.” And, at the time, she did not really know the beginning of the career of her instructor, Sarah Weddington, who died this weekend at 76.

Nonetheless, she contacted the law professor, with good results. Weddington agreed to let her audit the course, treated her like all the other students, and wrote a letter of recommendation to Diaz-Tello when she applied to law school herself. The letter, she said, was “the kindest and most generous letter.”

And, of course, Diaz-Tello – like thousands of other young Texans over the decades – has learned Deer vs. Wade, the 1973 United States Supreme Court ruling, of the woman who successfully argued the case.

“I can’t say enough about how educational it was to see someone in this position, to learn more about the civil rights aspects of gender justice and to really see a woman as a role model,” said Diaz-Tello, who is now a senior lawyer and legal director of If / When / How, a reproductive justice organization.

Born and raised in Abilene, the daughter of a Methodist pastor, Weddington was not likely to aim to be a national political figure. Becoming a lawyer was, in itself, an unusual accomplishment for a woman of her generation, and her early career was shaped by discrimination as well as her own talent and accomplishments.

As an undergraduate student at McMurry College, for example, one dean scoffed at her stated ambition to go to law school, cementing her determination to do so. After graduating from the University of Texas Law School in 1967, she couldn’t find a job at a law firm. It was a difficult situation that other women found themselves in as well, she later explained, as companies weren’t ready to take such a bold step.

“So many really unfair things stoked our passions, and we felt we had to change them, Weddington told reporter Pamela Colloff in an interview in 2003. “We realized that the only way to fix women’s issues was to elect women to the Legislative Assembly. No one else was going to do it, so we decided to do it ourselves.

In addition to being a lawyer, Weddington was a clerk at Texas House in 1965. She also had $ 100 in her checking account and was therefore able to pay the application fees to become a candidate. In addition, she had proper self-confidence, even though various guardians were still skeptical of women.

“I thought I could do better because a lot of those lawmakers in 1965 weren’t, as they say, the brightest light bulbs in the neighborhood,” Weddington told Colloff.

It was in this context that Weddington was approached about the affair that would become Roe.

Several like-minded women, including her law classmate Linda Coffee, have asked if she would be interested in helping challenge Texas’ abortion laws. At the time, Texas criminalized the procedure, except to save the life of a pregnant woman. Many other states had equally draconian restrictions.

Weddington was only 26 years old — 26 years old! -when she argued the case, in 1971. She had never tried a case before. But his limited experience did not prove to be an obstacle.

In 1973, the Supreme Court struck down several Texas laws, in a 7-2 decision that also ruled equally restrictive laws in other states unconstitutional: a landmark decision, and one that Weddington will long be remembered.

“Sarah was a warrior in the ongoing struggle for equal rights for women,” former President Jimmy Carter said in a statement.

In Texas, of course, Weddington’s death is a reminder of how things once were in this state – and how they still are, too often.

She was part of “this great matriarchy of Austin,” recalls another former student, lawyer Susan Hays, who is now running as Democratic Commissioner of Agriculture. Other members of this matriarchy included former Governor Ann Richards, journalist Molly Ivins and writer Liz Carpenter, who has tirelessly championed the women of Texas.

State Representative Jasmine Crockett, a Democrat from Dallas, forwarded a snapshot from 1973 sent to her by US Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson, also a Democrat from Dallas, after learning of Weddington’s death. The photo shows Johnson, Weddington and Kay Bailey Hutchison, a Republican who would become the first woman to represent Texas in the United States Senate. The three were, at the time, “new” members of Texas House.

“That was half the women who were sworn in at Texas House that year,” said Crockett, who is now running to succeed Johnson, who is retiring at the end of his term as representative. of the 30th Congressional District of Texas.

Women are still under-represented in state government. Just think that these women – two Democrats, one Republican, all three talented and dedicated to public service – might never have been elected, if not for the misdeeds of men.

The 1972 Texas election is remembered in part for the change it brought to state government in the wake of the Sharpstown fraud scandal. With allegations that heads of state, including the governor, had done Houston banker Frank Sharp a favor, voters that year fired dozens of sitting state lawmakers, in most cases ousting conservative Democrats instead of moderate Democrats or Republicans.

There is a certain painful irony in the fact that Weddington passed away at a time when the reproductive rights she had fought for are again under attack, in Texas and elsewhere.

But she must have realized that progress is not easy and change can be clawed back. Perhaps that is why so many Texans remember his mentoring this week, as well as his professional accomplishments.

“It was very intentional,” said Diaz-Tello, recalling how Weddington encouraged his ambitions years ago. “She was building a generation of feminist leaders, and here we are.”

erica.grieder@chron.com


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Former SVPD officer files another complaint against City https://cflweb.org/former-svpd-officer-files-another-complaint-against-city/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 21:49:44 +0000 https://cflweb.org/former-svpd-officer-files-another-complaint-against-city/ Disgruntled former Scotts Valley Police Department officer David Ball has launched a new lawsuit against the city of Scotts Valley Police Chief Steve Walpole, Jr. and his former intern Pascale Wowak, citing defamation and the intentional infliction of emotional distress. This is the third lawsuit that Ball, who was forcibly removed for allegedly sexually harassing […]]]>

Disgruntled former Scotts Valley Police Department officer David Ball has launched a new lawsuit against the city of Scotts Valley Police Chief Steve Walpole, Jr. and his former intern Pascale Wowak, citing defamation and the intentional infliction of emotional distress.

This is the third lawsuit that Ball, who was forcibly removed for allegedly sexually harassing and retaliating against Wowak, has brought in Santa Cruz County Superior Court against the city following his dismissal.

Scotts Valley City attorney Kirsten Powell said on Wednesday the city had yet to receive a copy of the new lawsuit, which was filed on Dec. 14, so it could not comment on it.

Wowak did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

Ball also filed a so-called “warrant assignment,” which is an attempted force reinstatement, as well as a claim for damages for age discrimination and for having suffered a “hostile work environment. “.

But documents from court records show authorities determined it was Ball who created a toxic workplace by sexually harassing Wowak on multiple occasions and then enlisted teammates to try to get the new police officer fired.

In a September 13, 2019 termination letter written by Walpole (to take effect September 27, 2019), Ball was charged with sex discrimination against Wowak.

“You subjected Officer Wowak to an unwelcome solicitation of sex, which she rejected,” Walpole wrote. “During her field training, you indicated a romantic or sexual interest in her by saying, ‘I’d better never get drunk with you, that would be dangerous. I’m not sure I can control myself.

Through his lawyer, Ball denied this.

“Ball is adamant that he has never shown romantic or sexual interest in Wowak, said Neil Berman, of Salinas-based Rucka, O’Boyle, Lombardo & McKenna.

Wowak had joined in early April 2018. She had already obtained a settlement in a class action lawsuit for sex discrimination against the Department of Public Safety in Sunnyvale – for an amount of $ 1.95 million – where she was employed as officer.

Based on Ball’s own recommendation, Wowak completed his field training faster than usual and was placed on his squad, according to the disciplinary letter, which said Ball would text Wowak on his day off. leave to tell her that he “missed her” and was “thinking about her.”

In at least one text, he sent a “Morning Sunshine” message, according to the letter.

Then, in late August, Ball told Wowak his wife discovered their text messages and was upset, according to the document.

“You then told Agent Wowak twice that if you had gotten nude photos of her it would have been worth it,” Walpole wrote. “Agent Wowak responded to you by telling you unequivocally that she had no intention of providing you with nude photos or having any other sexual relations with you.”

Suddenly, Wowak got a poor job performance grade at the end of September, which caused him to burst into tears, according to the disciplinary letter.

Ball again gave her a “poor performance” rating for October 2018, then attempted to have her fired at a staff meeting that month, Walpole wrote.

“In particular, prior to the September 2018 performance review, you did not create any documents regarding performance gaps or violations of Officer Wowak’s policy,” he wrote, adding that Wowak had been reassigned to the sergeant. Brandon Polito’s team around early November, he was reassigned again in January 2019. “The evidence shows that you had approached both Sgt. Polito and Sgt. Milroy, separately, to discuss your expectations that they are having issues with her performance, that these issues be documented, and that her employment be terminated while she is still on probation.

Polito declined to comment on Ball and Wowak’s relationship, or if Ball asked him to help get rid of her.

Through his lawyer, Ball denied asking Wowak to send him nude photos.

“He never solicited nude photos of Wowak,” Berman said, saying Wowak would initiate text conversations more frequently than he would, including after negative performance reports.

The termination letter adds that Ball enlisted three additional officers to make derogatory and demeaning comments about Wowak, including that his lawsuit against Sunnyvale DPS was “BS”.

Ball says it never happened.

And he argues that several elected officials, including long-time former SVPD officer Donna Lind, who is now mayor and has served on city council for years, should have recused themselves from considering the city manager’s final decision to fire him. .

“As all members of council do, they have an obligation to be impartial,” said City Attorney Powell. “She decided she could look at the facts apart from her relationship with the chief of police and the sergeant. Ball — Mr. Ball now.

However, Randy Johnson recused himself on apparent medical grounds, while Derek Timm recused due to a conflict of interest related to his previous work as a lawyer.

Lind told the Press banner that Ball did not object to her making a decision on the case.

“I worked with Dave Ball for most of his career,” she said. “I have spent my career evaluating the evidence.”

Wowak is still employed with the Scotts Valley Police Department.


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Police lieutenant in midfield alleges race and gender discrimination in city lawsuit https://cflweb.org/police-lieutenant-in-midfield-alleges-race-and-gender-discrimination-in-city-lawsuit/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 23:30:38 +0000 https://cflweb.org/police-lieutenant-in-midfield-alleges-race-and-gender-discrimination-in-city-lawsuit/ MIDFIELD, Alabama (WIAT) – A lieutenant with the Midfield Police Department filed a complaint alleging the city discriminated against her on the basis of her gender and race. In a lawsuit filed earlier this month, Lt. Donna Logan, a 15-year veteran of the Midfield Police Department, claimed the town had violated civil rights law by […]]]>

MIDFIELD, Alabama (WIAT) – A lieutenant with the Midfield Police Department filed a complaint alleging the city discriminated against her on the basis of her gender and race.

In a lawsuit filed earlier this month, Lt. Donna Logan, a 15-year veteran of the Midfield Police Department, claimed the town had violated civil rights law by discriminating against her after committing complained that she “was having trouble supervising white police officers.”

Logan’s claims are described in the lawsuit and a related complaint filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which is responsible for enforcing federal discrimination laws.

In the EEOC complaint, Logan said officers “will speak directly to Chief Jessie Bell (Black) and totally ignore my authority.”

She also said her access to the ministry’s payroll system had been revoked.

“The white sergeants under my authority have the code to access the pay system and they have been told not to give it to me, the EEOC complaint said. “I complained about the unfair treatment, but nothing was done to correct it.”

In a notice signed Sept. 7, the EEOC said it “would not continue its investigation” but added that the ruling “does not mean the claims have no merit.” This notice informed Logan of his right to pursue his claims within 90 days of receiving the letter from the EEOC.

In the federal lawsuit she filed earlier this month, Logan said her work environment changed once Jesse Bell was promoted to chief of police.

“Once Jesse Bell was promoted, I was not allowed to do my job,” the lawsuit said.

Logan’s lawsuit alleges that in July 2020, a meeting was held with Midfield Mayor Gary Richardson, a city councilor and the Police Department over the issues.

“Everyone at the meeting was informed that these practices would cease and that they would inform the mayor if they continued,” the lawsuit said.

Logan said she called the mayor the following week “because nothing has changed.”

“The mayor said he was attached and would call me back,” the prosecution said.

Logan said that instead of receiving a reminder from the mayor, she was called into the police chief’s office.

“I am now in retaliation [against] and my tasks are being changed, ”Logan said in the suit.

When contacted for comment, Logan told CBS 42 that she is currently on medical leave and will not comment on the lawsuit at this time.

Chief Bell said on Tuesday he had yet to receive a copy of the lawsuit and would not comment on Logan’s allegations.

CBS 42 made multiple attempts to contact Richardson and City Attorney David Sullivan for comment, but received no response on Tuesday evening.


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Religious freedom laws come under scrutiny | Islander https://cflweb.org/religious-freedom-laws-come-under-scrutiny-islander/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 16:30:31 +0000 https://cflweb.org/religious-freedom-laws-come-under-scrutiny-islander/ Faith groups, LGBTQI + advocates and legal experts will all conduct a controversial investigation into proposed religious discrimination laws. A parliamentary human rights committee will hold its first hearing as the federal government says it remains committed to legislating to protect Australians with religious beliefs. Greens Senator Janet Rice – who sits on the committee […]]]>

Faith groups, LGBTQI + advocates and legal experts will all conduct a controversial investigation into proposed religious discrimination laws.

A parliamentary human rights committee will hold its first hearing as the federal government says it remains committed to legislating to protect Australians with religious beliefs.

Greens Senator Janet Rice – who sits on the committee – said anti-discrimination laws must protect everyone equally.

“(The) religious discrimination bill remains a Trojan horse for hatred,” she told AAP.

“This bill will overturn existing state laws that protect people from discrimination and sectarian speech in the name of religion.”

The eight-and-a-half-hour hearing is expected to be led by organizations such as the Australian Group of Experts on Discrimination Law, the Australian Christian Lobby, the Australian Federation of Islamic Counsel, Equality Australia and the Human Rights Law Alliance.

The length of the investigation – the final report of which is due on February 4, 2022 – has also been criticized for being too short, especially with much of the schedule spanning the holiday period.

“This hearing is an important opportunity to hear diverse voices on the issues of this bill (but) the Liberals have insisted on a rushed investigation because the more people know, the less they like it,” the Liberals said. Senator Rice.

Attorney General Michaelia Cash is spearheading government efforts for tougher religious freedom laws, but the legislation has drawn opposition from moderate liberals worried about children being kicked out of schools for their sexuality .

A spokesperson for the attorney general’s office said the government recognizes the wide range of views on the bill, adding that it will be considered in detail by two commissions, both of which are due to report in February 2022.

The spokesperson said the government would consider the views of the respective committees and that any amendments would be addressed through the appropriate parliamentary processes.

“Our goal is for the committees to recommend both the bill and for the bill to pass smoothly in a bipartisan fashion once the committees are finished,” they told the AAP.

“We remain committed to pushing this bill through in a bipartisan fashion to provide basic protections for Australians with religious beliefs.”

A handful of moderate Liberal MPs won a concession from Prime Minister Scott Morrison on changes to the gender discrimination law that granted religious schools an exemption to discriminate against students and teachers on certain grounds.

But Senator Cash has muddied the waters by telling a webinar from a Christian lobby group that the Morrison government supports schools and religious organizations that maintain exemptions under the law.

Failure to keep the pledge can cause divisions in government, with a handful of MPs reserving the right to withhold their vote or cross the floor and vote against government legislation if concessions are not honored.

The Victorian government has also warned the Commonwealth that any attempt to override or relax the state’s anti-discrimination laws could result in a legal challenge that will lead to Australia’s highest court.

Kids Helpline 1800 55 1800 (for ages 5 to 25)

Australian Associated Press


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A Grip on Sports: After nearly two years, COVID-19 continues to plant its claws in sport at all levels https://cflweb.org/a-grip-on-sports-after-nearly-two-years-covid-19-continues-to-plant-its-claws-in-sport-at-all-levels/ Sat, 18 Dec 2021 17:05:17 +0000 https://cflweb.org/a-grip-on-sports-after-nearly-two-years-covid-19-continues-to-plant-its-claws-in-sport-at-all-levels/ INFLUENZA IN SPORT • Is sport doomed? Not in the long run. But this month. Following. Through the winter? Will the ever-growing spread of COVID-19 pull the rug in sporting events from high school to professional ranks? ••••••• • It seems like, However, when millions of dollars are involved – pro and college sports certainly […]]]>

INFLUENZA IN SPORT • Is sport doomed? Not in the long run. But this month. Following. Through the winter? Will the ever-growing spread of COVID-19 pull the rug in sporting events from high school to professional ranks?

•••••••

• It seems like, However, when millions of dollars are involved – pro and college sports certainly qualify – it’s hard to see the tap be turned off for a little thing like a third of players who get sick.

The NFL showed this to be the case yesterday when it changed its mind about the strict coronavirus rules it put in place over the summer. No postponement? We were joking. Hard rules for returning to the field after a positive test? Nah, we’re fine.

The league cited the rapid rise of the omicron variant and its ability to infect the unvaccinated and vaccinated as reason enough to make the changes. “The emergence of the omicron variant is precisely the kind of change that warrants a flexible response, the NFL said in a memo.

As if any outbreak this season had been caused by something other than a virulent variant. Of course, that was a possibility. It was the only possibility. But the league office hadn’t anticipated that such a thing would happen when they put together their strict rules? There is no evidence that he did. If he had, he would have covered his butt when his period was announced last summer.

But the NFL isn’t the only level, or league, that’s struggling. The NHL is also, maybe worse than anyone. The NBA is apparently trying to catch up. What about college hoops? We’ve seen it happen here before, with the University of Washington taking the day off in recent weeks.

It impacted Gonzaga – the Zags and Huskies were supposed to play last Sunday and didn’t – and forced him into this morning’s game with Texas Tech after a long layoff. At least the game is still active. UCLA’s marquee game with North Carolina has been called off as the Tar Heels quickly pivot to play Kentucky, who lost their game to the coronavirus-affected Ohio State.

And it wasn’t the only highly anticipated game canceled. The list has grown in the past 24 hours.

Don’t think it ends there. Some high school games in the Puget Sound area were called off last night with some being the key word here. The Washington Department of Health announced new, stricter protocols for all indoor sports, revoking the pass granted to those vaccinated. As soon as possible, all young participants in sports – whether vaccinated or not – basketball, wrestling and other high-contact indoor activities should be tested at least three times per week.

All because there was an omicron variant outbreak in the southwestern part of the state earlier this month, attributed to wrestling tournaments in the region.

“There were a ton of people in indoor spaces, crammed into bleachers without masks,” Dr Scott Lindquist, state epidemiologist for communicable diseases, told media. “So I can say clearly: No, the advice was not followed. “

Which, if I understand correctly, means that a group of people ignored guidelines for watching their kids wrestle and could have ruined winter sports seasons for everyone? Did I miss something?

That gives a whole new definition of the term “fanatic”, doesn’t it?

•••

Gonzaga: As far as we know, the game against Texas Tech in Phoenix will take place this morning. But if we learned anything from last season, it taught us that we don’t know for sure until the game starts. Theo Lawson is doing the game preview today and adding the key match. … Around the WCC, Saint Mary’s faced San Diego State on Friday night in Phoenix. The Gaels lost. … Portland lost while visiting the state of San Jose. … Pacific also lost at home to North Dakota State. … BYU is heading to Weber State tonight.

WSU: When Jake Dickert looked for someone to replace him as defensive coordinator, he didn’t want to change things. By hiring Brian Ward, a fellow coach in the past, he ensured that this would not happen. Colton Clark recently spoke with Ward and concocted this story. … Elsewhere in Pac-12 and college football, new Washington coach Kalen DeBoer is following the same path with his staff, hiring some from Fresno State and keeping some of the staff at Jimmy Lake. … Jon Wilner is answering a few questions this morning on the Mercury News site. … Oregon State will end its season today against the same school WSU started the season playing: Utah State. … The Pac-12 would appreciate a Beaver victory. … Britain Covey is one of the main reasons Utah finally reached the Rose Bowl. … Oregon has made a few hires, including coordinators on both sides of the ball. … Everyone, including UCLA, is cautious of the coronavirus. … USC is trying to change its recent missteps in recruiting, one of which hasn’t attracted enough local talent to stay home. … Colorado has hired an offensive coordinator. … In basketball news, eighth-place Arizona welcomes Cal Baptist as the Wildcats prepare for the conference game. … Utah is heading south for another tough non-conference game. … Colorado faces Cal State Bakersfield. … USC has extended coach Andy Enfeld’s contract. … Oregon faces No. 1 Baylor.

EWU: Legal (and financial) news keeps coming from Cheney. Former football coach Chad Bodnar filed a lawsuit against the school, alleging that discrimination based on age and gender was at the root of his dismissal. Jim Allen has this story. … Around the Big Sky, the State of Montana faces a familiar foe, the State of South Dakota, with a spot in the FCS title game on the line. Winner faces, who else, State of North Dakota. … In basketball news, northern Arizona has at least one player whose trip to Flagstaff has not been easy. … Weber State will try to bounce back from BYU’s visit.

Preparations: Before we dive into the changes in COVID-19, we’ll pass on this roundup from Dave Nichols. It covers the Friday night action. … Dave also has a notebook that examines the reaction to changes in state policy. … These changes are covered by Arielle Dreher in SR and others around the state.

Chiefs: A quick start led to a well-deserved 4-1 victory over visiting Portland on Friday night. Kevin Dudley was in the arena and covered this game.

Seahawks: Seattle has two players facing COVID-19. The Rams have over a third of their roster. Plus, the Hawks are essentially out of the playoff race. Los Angeles is still in contention for the NFC West title. The game has been postponed until Tuesday evening. Did we mention that the team that could have forfeited under the now superseded league guidelines is located in Los Angeles? … Games between the Rams and the Seahawks always seem to have something more. … Former Hawks offensive lineman George Fant is doing remarkable things off the field.

Kraken: The December 23 game in Calgary has already been postponed.

•••

• If I seem to be a little annoyed because some selfish… ah, forget that. Getting vaccinated, boosting, always wearing a mask inside, even in coaching, that is not enough. Because others will not do what is necessary so that we can continue to play sports in high school. Now someone will put a tampon in my nose three times a week. (And don’t get me started on all of those people who got sick or died from the pandemic, many of whom shouldn’t have been affected in the first place.) What a treat. Regarding the last step, however, I am pessimistic. If the numbers continue to rise (and the outlook seems to be that they will), it seems unlikely that the state will allow the sport to continue in high school, at least with fans in attendance. Until later …


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“History will not judge kindly” on schools that discriminate against LGBTI children: the principal https://cflweb.org/history-will-not-judge-kindly-on-schools-that-discriminate-against-lgbti-children-the-principal/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 05:54:56 +0000 https://cflweb.org/history-will-not-judge-kindly-on-schools-that-discriminate-against-lgbti-children-the-principal/ When asked what her response would be to a family asking her to consider enrolling their child who had passed from a boy to a girl, she replied, “I will say yes”. Likewise, female students who switch to male are welcome to stay in school. SCEGGS Darlinghurst Principal Jenny Allum said her school would never […]]]>

When asked what her response would be to a family asking her to consider enrolling their child who had passed from a boy to a girl, she replied, “I will say yes”. Likewise, female students who switch to male are welcome to stay in school.

SCEGGS Darlinghurst Principal Jenny Allum said her school would never seek to use legal exemptions to discriminate against LBGTQI staff or students.Credit:Louis Douvis

“There is no policy that says you would not be welcome here again, she said.

Far from reflecting the position of the wider faith community, the views of principals are based on a range of opinions on the usefulness of exemptions, which includes staunch opposition to their removal from powerful groups. faith-based organizations, including Christian Schools Australia and the Australian Christian Lobby.

A number of moderate Liberal MPs, including Dave Sharma and Katie Allen, are pushing for the repeal of Section 38 (3) to be speeded up, seeing this as a crucial step before further scrutiny can be given to the government. bill on religious discrimination. Attorney General Michaelia Cash appeared this week to backtrack on a deal with the moderates that would see this issue resolved before any vote on the bill, and instead re-engaged in a review process by the Australian Law Reform Commission which would see further protections for LGBTQI students delayed for up to 12 months after the bill is passed.

Professor Patrick Parkinson, dean of the University of Queensland Law School and head of the Freedom for Faith think tank, said the legislation could be fixed, but the simple repeal of the s38 (3) exemption This was not the right solution to a complex problem, and one that would expose denominational schools “to the problems that the gender identity provisions have caused”.

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“The sections of the law dealing with discrimination on the basis of gender identity are vague and poorly drafted,” said Professor Parkinson.

“No one has given any thought to the legal obligations imposed on schools if a troubled teenager decides they are ‘trans’ or ‘non-binary’. Should the school accept the adolescent’s self-identification? What about from the parents’ point of view? What does it even mean for a school’s uniform policy, for example, if a teenage girl insists she is “non-binary”? “

Christian Schools Australia policy director Mark Spencer said schools wanted to be able to have pastoral conversations with students about their sexuality and gender identity “without the threat of prosecution.”

“It is the pastoral that reflects our clearly stated values ​​and it is the pastoral that could tell the young people that we obviously do not agree with this behavior and we do not think that it is the best thing for you”, Mr Spencer said. .

In some cases, this behavior “could lead to disciplinary consequences if it actively undermines the ethics of the school,” he said.

The president of the Islamic Council of Victoria, Adel Salman, said the repeal of exemptions for students had not been specifically discussed in the Islamic school sector, saying it was a “non-problem” .

“I am not aware of any situation in Australia where an Islamic school has ever discriminated against a trans student or a gay student. It never happened, ”Mr. Salman said.

He said that all the students were taught the core values ​​of Islam, including that homosexuality is prohibited, and that they would not be allowed to campaign against these values ​​inside the school.

“We cannot have Islamic schools that allow students to openly call for homosexuality … or if students start espousing the legitimacy of same-sex marriage when it is completely against religion,” he said. -he declares. “If the students themselves are gay, and as long as they don’t openly promote it or practice it within the school, then the school will likely understand. It’s a very fine balancing act.


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Attorney General Michaelia Cash Says Religious Discrimination and Gay Student Protection Bill “Separate Issues” https://cflweb.org/attorney-general-michaelia-cash-says-religious-discrimination-and-gay-student-protection-bill-separate-issues/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 06:14:09 +0000 https://cflweb.org/attorney-general-michaelia-cash-says-religious-discrimination-and-gay-student-protection-bill-separate-issues/ Earlier this month, Prime Minister Scott Morrison agreed to speed up protection for gay students in a bid to gain support from moderate Liberal MPs ahead of a possible vote on the bill in the final week of the Parliament. But a vote on the bill was delayed and it was instead referred to two […]]]>

Earlier this month, Prime Minister Scott Morrison agreed to speed up protection for gay students in a bid to gain support from moderate Liberal MPs ahead of a possible vote on the bill in the final week of the Parliament. But a vote on the bill was delayed and it was instead referred to two parliamentary committees for review over the summer.

Responding to Senator Cash’s comments, moderate Victorian Liberal MP Katie Allen said she had requested a meeting with the Attorney General to clarify the deal with the Prime Minister.

Liberal NSW MP Dave Sharma said: “I have made it clear that discrimination against students and teachers needs to be dealt with swiftly, and I see no need for an extra review and period of time. ‘waiting.”

The bills present themselves as an electoral test for the coalition and Labor, with both sides keen to win the support of faith communities without isolating LGBTIQ groups who believe the laws will allow discrimination against them on religious grounds.

Senator Cash said during the webinar that the Prime Minister made it clear that gay students should not be kicked out because of their sexuality, adding, “I think we all agree with that.”

“But to be clear, this bill does not deal with that. This bill aims to protect people from religious discrimination on the basis of their beliefs or non-beliefs, ”she said.

She said it was the Labor Party that made it clear “they would be the ones to deal with this issue”.

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Shadow Attorney General Mark Dreyfus said last week the opposition would seek to make the issue of protecting gay students and teachers a key part of parliamentary inquiries.

Moderate Liberal MPs including Ms. Allen, Mr. Sharma, Angie Bell and Fiona Martin are among those on the government benches who have raised concerns about the bill and the need for more protections for the government. gay students and teachers.

In a statement following the webinar, a spokesperson for Senator Cash said the government would consider the views of the respective committees, saying “any amendment will also be addressed through the appropriate parliamentary processes.”

“We recognize that a number of stakeholders wished to be consulted on the issue of exemptions in the HPA. [Sex Discrimination Act]. We can assure them that they will have this opportunity through the committee process and through their submissions and public hearings to share their views, ”said the spokesperson.

“Our goal is for committees to recommend both the bill and for the bill to pass smoothly in a bipartisan fashion once the committees are finished.”

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Federal Court of Appeal to review Charter Day School dress code for girls https://cflweb.org/federal-court-of-appeal-to-review-charter-day-school-dress-code-for-girls/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 20:56:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/federal-court-of-appeal-to-review-charter-day-school-dress-code-for-girls/ BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WECT) – On the surface, this is a lawsuit over whether girls should be allowed to wear pants at a private charter school in Brunswick County. But it was the potential far-reaching impacts of this case that led more than a dozen federal judges to take a very close look at the […]]]>

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WECT) – On the surface, this is a lawsuit over whether girls should be allowed to wear pants at a private charter school in Brunswick County. But it was the potential far-reaching impacts of this case that led more than a dozen federal judges to take a very close look at the dress code at Leland’s Charter Day School.

“I think this case is attracting attention because it goes straight to the heart of the parents’ choice and the choice of the school which best corresponds to their educational philosophy and which, according to them, will suit their children best”, constitutional lawyer Aaron Streett told WECT on Monday.

He represents Charter Day School in a lawsuit first brought against the school in 2016, by the parents of three girls who were students there. They opposed the requirement that girls wear a skirt, skort or sweater, but not pants like boys in school can wear.

The Charter Day School is one of several charter schools in the region operated by a private board, but funded by public funds. Charter schools were created in large part to provide parents with an alternative to traditional public schools, without having to pay for a private school. Charter schools have the flexibility to teach however they see fit, and in many cases, charter school students outperform their peers attending traditional public school.

Charter Day School takes a traditional approach to teaching, promoting traditional values, manners and respect. They believe their gender-specific dress code instills mutual respect, discipline and order. Boys cannot wear jewelry, must wear a belt, and must keep their hair cut. With the exception of gym classes and school trips, girls must wear a skirt and cannot wear pants.

Parents who sued Charter Day School, with help from the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), argue that the dress code prevented their daughters from moving freely during recess and made it more difficult for them to sit in certain positions. They also said it was outdated and worried their daughters would feel inferior to their male classmates.

The case first went to a lower Brunswick County court, which ruled that school dress codes fell outside the protection of Title IX, a federal law prohibiting sex discrimination in schools. But in March, the Richmond, Va., Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the ruling, saying a dress code that requires girls to wear skirts is discriminatory and violates Title IX.

A three-judge panel of the Court of Appeal rendered the decision in March. The entire body of 16 judges that make up the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals subsequently voted to review the decision. This review took place on Friday.

Legal experts say these kinds of reviews tend to happen when major issues are at stake, or the larger court disagrees with the small group’s decision. The main legal questions to be debated in this case are whether a school’s dress code is governed by Title IX and whether the Charter Day School is a state actor. Although the school is publicly funded, no one is required to attend. Parents choose to send their children to charter day school, and the school’s track record is strong enough that there is a waiting list to enter.

Streett says this matter goes way beyond the dress code.

“I think it’s also important to understand that this is the kind of choice that could affect any charter school, regardless of the philosophy of education. And if the Court of Appeal or any other tribunal declares that charter schools are essentially state actors, then they will be back in many ways on a par with traditional government-run public schools, which is exactly what the North Carolina legislature was trying to do. stay away from charter schools, ”Street explained of the profound implications of this case.

Lawyers for the ACLU were not immediately available for comment, but some judges who have considered this case over the past year have echoed concerns about the dress code at Charter Day School.

“No, it’s not 1821 or 1921. It’s 2021. Women serve in the combat units of our armed forces. Women walk in space … sit on our nation’s Supreme Court, in Congress, and today a woman is Vice President of the United States. Yet girls in some public schools in North Carolina are required to wear skirts to conform to the old-fashioned and illogical view that courteous behavior on the part of both sexes can only be achieved if girls are dressed in clothing. that reinforce gender stereotypes and signal that girls are not as capable and resilient as boys, ”Fourth Circuit judge Barbara Milano Keenan wrote in her dissent from the three-judge panel decision earlier this year.

The full decision of the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals after the case is examined on Friday could be delivered within the next three to six months.

Copyright 2021 WECT. All rights reserved.


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A judge ruled that a North Carolina charter school’s ban on girls wearing pants was unconstitutional. The school is backing down. https://cflweb.org/a-judge-ruled-that-a-north-carolina-charter-schools-ban-on-girls-wearing-pants-was-unconstitutional-the-school-is-backing-down/ Sat, 11 Dec 2021 22:59:14 +0000 https://cflweb.org/a-judge-ruled-that-a-north-carolina-charter-schools-ban-on-girls-wearing-pants-was-unconstitutional-the-school-is-backing-down/ Chills during outdoor lunches. Forbidden to sit cross-legged on the floor like the boys. Forbidden to play football or cartwheels during recess. This is how three girls described the daily discomforts they felt due to their school’s dress code, in statements in federal court. The judge ruled in their favor, in a court ruling that […]]]>

Chills during outdoor lunches. Forbidden to sit cross-legged on the floor like the boys. Forbidden to play football or cartwheels during recess. This is how three girls described the daily discomforts they felt due to their school’s dress code, in statements in federal court.

The judge ruled in their favor, in a court ruling that was supposed to usher in a new day for girls attending Charter Day School in North Carolina. In March 2019, U.S. District Judge Malcolm Howard ruled that the school’s dress code, which prohibited its female students from wearing shorts or slacks, was unconstitutional, violating students’ rights to equal protection under the law.

But the Leland Elementary and Middle Charter Public School in North Carolina fought back, defending its right to institute a school policy that, in the words of its founder, was “to preserve chivalry and respect among young women and men ”.

Charter Day School, which is part of a network known as Classical Charter Schools of America, filed a lawsuit in 2020, arguing that because it is run by a private, non-profit organization, it is exempt from the constitutional requirement, which applies to entities managed by the government.

The school did not respond to an interview request, but lawyers for the school told Reuters in August that the uniform code, which also requires boys to keep their hair short, is intended to teach discipline and reduce distractions.

In a statement given to Reuters by its lawyers, Charter Day School said, “Girls and boys continue to flock to these classically oriented schools, and girls academically outperform their male and female peers in public schools, while achieving extraordinary success in sports and other extracurricular activities.

On Friday, the school’s challenge was heard by the Fourth Circuit of Appeal, which will decide whether the school should be considered an “actor of the state” – and be held responsible for violating the protection clause. equal to the 14th Amendment.

Holding the scales is more than a dress code, said Galen Sherwin, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union who is the girls’ lead lawyer.

“The implications here are much broader,” she said, “as it would potentially apply to any constitutional freedom that is violated under a charter school, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, the right not to be searched and seized, due process and beyond.

The school’s policy had been controversial before the lawsuit, which was filed in 2016. Keely Burks, then a CDS student and one of the plaintiffs in the case, wrote in an ACLU blog post that ‘she had started a petition asking for the skirt requirement. to delete.

Wearing a skirt prevented her from playing soccer during recess and doing “flips and cartwheels” like the boys in her class, she wrote. Girls also had to wear them during the winter. “Even with tights and leggings,” she said, the uniform did little to protect them from the cold.

But after getting “over 100 signatures,” the petition was confiscated by a teacher, she said.

Sherwin said the ACLU took up the case after a relative, Bonnie Peltier, contacted the organization. During a parenting orientation in 2015, Peltier learned that girls’ uniform rules require them to wear skirts, sweaters, or skorts unless they were in physical education class.

According to court documents, Peltier contacted Baker Mitchell, founder of Roger Bacon Academy, which runs Charter Day School.

In an email, Mitchell said the dress code and other school policies were written to “preserve chivalry and respect among young women and men.”

It meant “a code of conduct where women are … seen as a fragile vessel that men are supposed to care for and honor,” Mitchell wrote.

He added that a learning environment that “embodied traditional values” was needed to address concerns such as “teenage pregnancies” and “casual sex”.

The Charter Day case is the first to focus on a school uniform or grooming policy that the ACLU has adopted, Sherwin said.

“There hasn’t been a lot of litigation around school dress codes until recently,” she noted.

Lawsuits against school dress codes and grooming policies proliferated in the 1960s and 1970s, but they mostly focused on demands that boys not wear long hair, Sherwin said.

But after the enactment in 1972 of Title IX, the federal law that prohibits sex discrimination in all federally funded schools, this type of litigation began to disappear, as schools moved away from “distinctions based on” sex and grooming-based ”.

Over the past five years, students and parents across the country have drawn renewed attention to school dress policies which they believe are either blatantly discriminatory or unevenly enforced. Many of the high-profile cases have revolved around rules banning protective hairstyles for black college students, such as braids, cornrows, twists, locs, and extensions.

Charter Day School’s most recent textbook states that its uniform is intended to “instill discipline and maintain order so that student learning is not hampered.” “

“The school has designed its dress code to reflect the standards of the community of parents who have chosen to send their children to school,” it read.

In practice, Sherwin said, the policy restricts the ability of girls to participate equally in school activities.

The emphasis on “chivalry” is also not always as benign as the school’s founder suggested, Sherwin added. By emphasizing the difference between the sexes, “it is clearly intended to teach children that women are the weaker sex,” she argued.

A second ruling, released this year, concluded that the dress code violated Title IX rules but that the equal protection clause did not apply because the school is not a state actor.

On Friday, Sherwin argued that the charter day school is considered a government entity under North Carolina law and must uphold the rights of students in the 14th Amendment.

Riddhi Sandil, psychologist and co-founder of the Sexuality, Women and Gender Project at Columbia University’s Teachers College, said policies around school uniforms can have benefits: they can foster a sense of allegiance and community with their counterparts, as well as potentially alleviating class differences.

But they have also been used to control the bodies of young women and girls, she added.

Regarding “traditional gender values,” said Sandil, “not all traditional values ​​need to be respected”.

Sandil, whose research focuses on the stress experienced by minority groups, said that gender-restrictive dress codes like that at Charter Day School can create an environment of “constant surveillance” for girls, as they teach them. ‘they must be vigilant “at all times” so as not to attract unwanted or negative attention.

The school said its dress code is meant to help students focus on school, but Sandil said the dress code could distract from the girls’ learning experience. The foundress’ emphasis on chivalry “by definition” implies that girls are weak, she added.

Ultimately, Sandil said, she thinks it’s difficult to separate the Charter Day dress restrictions – and her commitment to “chivalry” and “tradition” – from a deeper unease at letting them. women and girls speak out.

“This is how we see a way of experiencing misogyny,” Sandil said. “You can’t trust women with a choice. “


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