Gender Equality – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 06:20:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cflweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Gender Equality – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ 32 32 Italian dictionary Treccani embraces gender equality in major shift https://cflweb.org/italian-dictionary-treccani-embraces-gender-equality-in-major-shift/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 06:20:41 +0000 https://cflweb.org/italian-dictionary-treccani-embraces-gender-equality-in-major-shift/ Treccani tackles gender discrimination with a “revolutionary” new edition. The historical Italian dictionary Treccani will record the feminine form of nouns and adjectives on an equal footing with the masculine and abolish gender stereotypes in its latest edition to be published in October. For the first time in the history of Italian vocabularies, the masculine […]]]>

Treccani tackles gender discrimination with a “revolutionary” new edition.

The historical Italian dictionary Treccani will record the feminine form of nouns and adjectives on an equal footing with the masculine and abolish gender stereotypes in its latest edition to be published in October.

For the first time in the history of Italian vocabularies, the masculine gender will not benefit from privileged treatment.

The order is also alphabetical, so if you are looking for – for example – the word “beautiful”, the feminine “bella“will be listed before the masculine”hello“.

In another breakthrough, the dictionary will record the professions of women whose titles, although existing in the Italian language, were historically considered jobs for men.

These include “lawyer” (lawyer), “sindaca“(mayor), “minister” (minister), “medical“(doctor),”note» (notary) and «soldiery” (soldier).

Similarly, the term “housewife” (casalinga) will no longer be registered only in the feminine but will also include the masculine form”casalingo“.

Likewise, the dictionary will tackle gender stereotypes by eliminating references and examples in which the woman is at home cooking and ironing while the man is usually a manager or reading a newspaper.

The new edition is presented by Treccani as “an ambitious and revolutionary project, in which tradition and progress come together to bear witness to the socio-cultural changes of our country”, recognizing and validating “new nuances, definitions and meanings”.

Giuseppe Patota, who led the changes with Valeria Della Valle, told the newspaper Corriere della Sera that the newly reorganized edition “creates absolutely no difficulty for those who consult the dictionary, but restores to the words a denied truth and reality, nullified for centuries”.

The updated dictionary will also list new terms, many of which are covid-related, such as lockdown, social distancing (social distancing), DAD (online learning), thermoscan and smart work.

Shutterstock Photos

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Ubisoft launches five-year plan to help improve diversity https://cflweb.org/ubisoft-launches-five-year-plan-to-help-improve-diversity/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 19:12:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/ubisoft-launches-five-year-plan-to-help-improve-diversity/ Ubisoft has announced a new five-year plan called Project Rise which will see the publisher attempt to improve “racial, ethnic and cultural diversity” within the company as well as the majority of its studios. In a recent blog post on the Ubisoft website (thanks, GamesIndustry.biz), Director of Human Resources Anika Grant and Vice President for […]]]>

Ubisoft has announced a new five-year plan called Project Rise which will see the publisher attempt to improve “racial, ethnic and cultural diversity” within the company as well as the majority of its studios.


In a recent blog post on the Ubisoft website (thanks, GamesIndustry.biz), Director of Human Resources Anika Grant and Vice President for Global Diversity, Inclusion and Accessibility Raashi Sikka described several things they plan to do to improve diversity and also talked about some of the steps the company has apparently already taken.

Related: What Do We Really Want From An Assassin’s Creed Homecoming

“We know that we have room for growth when it comes to the representation of racial, ethnic and cultural diversity, both within Ubisoft and the gaming industry in general, says Sikka. “With this in mind, we have created a multi-year strategy called Project Rise to ensure that Ubisoft better reflects the diversity of our players, with an emphasis on racial, ethnic and cultural diversity.”

GAME VIDEO OF THE DAY

In the interview, Sikka also claims that she has worked on gender equality within the company, saying that “women now make up 25% of our team members” and that “a third of all hires in the last year were women.” Grant also claimed that the gender pay gap at Ubisoft has been reduced at Ubisoft from 1.7 to 1.3%, but promises the company “isn’t done yet.”

Yet despite all these supposed changes to diversity and gender equality, Ubisoft employees are still unhappy with the amount of change seen at the company since it was accused of fostering a culture of toxic work. Better Ubisoft said progress in reforming the company has been “painfully slow” and several reported abusers are still in positions of power.

Employees said a new reporting system had been put in place, but those accused of abusing staff would have been moved to different roles and even different studios. It’s unclear if Ubisoft plans to address these employee concerns with this five-year plan, but hopefully working conditions at the publisher will improve as soon as possible.

Next: A Bunch Of Games I Loved At Gamescom 2022

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UN Women promotes gender balance https://cflweb.org/un-women-promotes-gender-balance/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 23:20:42 +0000 https://cflweb.org/un-women-promotes-gender-balance/ By Henri Uche The The need to amplify women‘s voices and encourage their participation in politics and representation in governance has taken center stage as Nigerians count down to the 2023 elections. In a recent dialogue between media executives organized by UN Women (UN-Women) and Women Radio (WFM) with the support of the Canadian government, […]]]>

By Henri Uche

The The need to amplify women‘s voices and encourage their participation in politics and representation in governance has taken center stage as Nigerians count down to the 2023 elections.

In a recent dialogue between media executives organized by UN Women (UN-Women) and Women Radio (WFM) with the support of the Canadian government, it was decided that Nigerian women certainly deserve more than the level and l tilt of the visibility they get from the media.

The dialogue was followed by a two-day training for journalists and aimed to equip them with skills on the most effective approach to reporting on gender-sensitive issues.

One of the key takeaways from the sessions was the burden placed on journalists to ensure that equal opportunities are given to women and other vulnerable people in their reporting.

According to UN Women Country Representative in Nigeria and ECOWAS, Beatrice Eyong, although Nigeria has produced some of the most intelligent and influential women in the world, the voice of women in Nigeria over the years has not. not been heard.

Quoting the Director General of the World Trade Organization (WTO), Dr. Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the Deputy Secretary General of the United Nations, Amina Mohammed and many other Nigerian women who are making waves in different spheres of activity human across the world. , she wondered why the Nigerian media would not help women, especially unsung heroes, to come forward.

“Our women there shake the world, but here they are scorned with threats of assault and intimidation. They are singled out as belonging in the kitchen and in the other room. Gender-sensitive reporting seeks to eliminate all constraints and burdens preventing women and other vulnerable people from empowering themselves.

“Those who reject or oppose gender equality should abstain. Women need equal opportunities in education and other critical sectors to maximize their potential. We are not calling on women to be recalcitrant nor are we trying to overthrow men, rather it is a call for the media to change the ugly narrative that makes women and other vulnerable people look like humans on the way of disappearance. Gender equality aims for sustainable development that would lift women out of poverty, Eyong emphasized.

Eyong argued that if the media did nothing about the blatant act of relegating women, the situation would get worse. She also expressed the view that “wherever women are duly recognized, recognized and involved, things are going well. Much effort has been made by some civil society organizations (CSOs) to untangle women from the shackles of poor representation in power at all levels, however, more actions are needed to ensure that their light shines, the media must be in the forefront of the positive denunciation of women.

For Women Radio CEO, Toun Okewale Sonaiya, being deliberate and intentional in reporting women and other vulnerable people is a duty. According to her, journalists must be conscious and strategic in their work if democracy is to flourish in the country.

“Journalists must be deliberate to be inclusive, responsive and balanced while fulfilling their constitutional obligations. Avoid gendered words, give equal representation as news sources or news content, and be aware of unconscious biases against women. It’s not a crime if women get a front-page post,” she said.

Sonaiya, who spoke on inclusive, responsive and balanced reporting, frowned upon the little or no representation, in some cases, of women at the executive level in most media outlets, recalled the Equality Project 50 -50 initiated by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) which was designed to empower women. One of its goals is to ensure that half of the contributors and decision makers are women.

In her presentation, a gender equality activist/media strategist, Ene Ede, said that a lot will go wrong if journalists do not report gender issues correctly and change misguided narratives, adding that development socio-political and economic context of the country depended on how positively gender equality issues are brought to the fore.

Ede, known as Mama Gender, lamented the number of women in the National Assembly, INEC and other strategic positions in different Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) in the country, adding that although ‘There are documents in Nigeria among political parties, businesses and the country as a whole that support women, but these documents are very difficult to implement.

“We have been involved in this campaign and advocacy for some time, and we must continue to spread this message. Women and other vulnerable people should not be treated with contempt or as second class people. The media has the power to shape the conversation there. We have to be very sensitive in our choice of words. Stereotypes are unacceptable. We don’t drag anything with you; we are only saying that we have the potential to reach any level in life. The system must be designed to enable us to achieve our highest purpose,” she stressed.

Similarly, Wole Soyinka Center for Investigative Journalism (WSCIJ) Executive Director Motunrayo Alaka, who spoke on the RUSH Model: A Catalyst for Good Representation and Reporting, reminded journalists that they are therefore the leaders of the civic space; it is their job to put things in the right perspective as opinion shapers in society

Alaka was of the view that nation building is a function of fair, balanced, objective and gender sensitive reporting. She asked journalists to be careful how they present stories, adding that any poor presentation of information could trigger a backlash from the public.

“Our culture is one of learning. RUSH stands for: Report Until Something Happens “We have to go down into the backcountry and find these women and other vulnerable people (the underreported) and get them to the flash point,” a- she challenged media professionals.

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The gender pay gap is widening: research https://cflweb.org/the-gender-pay-gap-is-widening-research/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 06:49:43 +0000 https://cflweb.org/the-gender-pay-gap-is-widening-research/ Job seekers browse employment information at a job fair held at a convention center in Daegu on Friday. (Yonhap) More women are employed, but Korea’s gender pay gap remains wide, a Ministry of Gender study found on Tuesday. The Ministry of Gender Equality and Family has published the results of a study entitled “The lives […]]]>

Job seekers browse employment information at a job fair held at a convention center in Daegu on Friday. (Yonhap)

More women are employed, but Korea’s gender pay gap remains wide, a Ministry of Gender study found on Tuesday.

The Ministry of Gender Equality and Family has published the results of a study entitled “The lives of men and women through statistics”. Although the Ministry of Gender has conducted the study every year since 1997 under the title “Women‘s Lives Through Statistics”, it changed its name this year, including an index on dual-income families and cyberattacks. sexual.

In 2021, Korea had a gender wage gap of 35.4%, meaning women earned on average 31.4% less than men.

The female employment rate last year was 50.7%, marking an increase of 0.5 percentage points from the previous year. The employment rate gap between men and women was 18.8. percent, slightly less than the previous year’s point of 19.1 percent.

However, 47.4% of employed women were non-regular workers, including those in temporary positions, while 31% of employed men were non-regular workers.

The gender pay gap has widened, according to the report. While a male employee earned an average of 3.83 million won ($2,780) per month, a female employee earned an average of 2.47 million won per month, or 64.6% of the average male salary. . The gender wage gap in monthly income was 1.36 million won, an increase of 3 percent from last year.

There were 1.44 million women on career breaks in Korea last year, about 57,000 fewer than the previous year. Women in their late twenties were the most employed age group, with 70.9% employed. But the figure dropped significantly for women in their late thirties, as only 57.5% of them were employed.

The reasons for many women’s career breaks were child care, marriage, pregnancy and childbirth.

The study also showed that more women received medical services for infertility treatment in 2021, which is a tenfold increase from 2017. Last year, 79,099 women and 65,900 men received received medical services for the treatment of infertility. The average age of women giving birth for the first time was 32.3 years, 3.2 years older than in 2005.

By Im Eun-byel (silverstar@heraldcorp.com)

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The (gender) role of a teacher https://cflweb.org/the-gender-role-of-a-teacher/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 12:00:07 +0000 https://cflweb.org/the-gender-role-of-a-teacher/ According to world Bankthe female workforce in India is only 20% of the total workforce. The LinkedIn Opportunities Index 2021 found that more than 4 in 5 working women (85%) say they missed a raise, promotion or job offer because of their gender. The ongoing controversy over a young woman assistant professor from the reputed […]]]>

According to world Bankthe female workforce in India is only 20% of the total workforce.

The LinkedIn Opportunities Index 2021 found that more than 4 in 5 working women (85%) say they missed a raise, promotion or job offer because of their gender. The ongoing controversy over a young woman assistant professor from the reputed St. Xavier’s College, Kolkata was forced to resign for posting ‘objectionable’ photos on her personal social media account is a case in point.

Professor Joseph H. Pleck proposed the Gender Role Constraint Paradigm (GRSP) in its founding book “The Myth of Masculinity” which can be used as a lens to examine this scenario.

The GRSP allows us to understand how cultural norms, social norms and institutional expectations related to ‘gender role identity’ – ‘femininity’ and ‘masculinity’ – influence individual conduct in infants and adults; and organize everything for the long term – from the socialization of young students in an educational environment to the emotions, expressions and behaviors of faculty members and college administration.

The current case of a college’s regulation techniques (reading, policing) of an individual assistant professor’s speech and expression on social media fits quite well into Pleck’s paradigm which explains how the “gender role strain” arises from the deviation or inability of an individual to respect or to society and an institution normative order of femininity.

Pleck’s “gender role norms”

Five of Pleck’s ten major propositions may be directly relevant to the present controversy, namely:

  1. Gender roles are operationally defined by gender role stereotypes and norms: The Guardian of the student who had filed a formal complaint with the college against the professor worried about the type of education such a teacher would give to his son, whom he protected all his life from “gross indecency and objectification of the female body…”
  2. Violating gender role norms leads to social condemnation: The professor was yelled into a room, in the presence of university officials, including the vice-chancellor, registrar and head of the ‘gender cell’, and told of the complaint. This “control room” circulated the questionable photographs of the professor among them and asked her to confirm their veracity. What followed was a rigorous session of moral policing, disparaging the professor’s conduct on social media and her upbringing.
  3. The violation of gender role norms leads to negative psychological consequences: At the end of the meeting, the assistant professor was asked to apologize and tender her resignation, as it was too late for any further appeal as the photographs had already gone viral among students.
  4. The real or imagined violation of gender role norms obliges individuals to conform to them: St. Xavier’s College, Kolkata is a “sacred institution” and so he has strict dress coded for his students. Female and male guards at the gates of the college protect the integrity, decency, and morality of the institution by brazenly dismissing students wearing anything “objectionable.” The teacher was once a student at this college and if the three years she had been here had failed to develop a moral character in her, then what could? She should have known better!
  5. Each gender experiences gender role tension in their paid work and family: Women are automatically bound by descriptive and prescriptive gender norms in the workplace because, as part of “impression management”, they seek to connect with colleagues, project an authentic feminine identity and form a deeper departmental alliance; all under the pretext of being accepted into the organization.However, in this case, the college went too far by monitoring not only the employee’s conduct on its premises, but even her individual expression on social media. Essentially, the college judged the character of its employee based on her social media profile and not based on her work as a professor.

American case law on “gender stereotyping” in the workplace

In Price Waterhouse Cooper (PWC) vs. Ann Hopkins 490 US 228 (1989)watercraftthe world-renowned accounting firm, refused to promote Ann Hopkins to managing partner because she did not behave and dress in a traditional feminine manner.

Unlike other PWC partners, Hopkins demonstrated exceptional performance, professional independence and integrity as a project manager. She worked long hours with multidisciplinary teams that she vigorously pushed and demanded excellence from; she has dealt directly with clients who have showered her with praise for being a hands-on project manager; and she had even won a $25 million contract with the US State Department.

However, completely erasing his career achievements – productivity, energy and creativity in the workplace – some PWC partners have described Hopkins as “macho”, “abrasive”, “boring”, “irritating”, a “tough talker, somewhat masculine, with a hard nose”. manager’ and a ‘woman’s libber’, while the others advised Hopkins to ‘take a course at charm school’ and to ‘walk more femininely, talk more femininely, dress more femininely, wear makeup, do their hair and wear jewellery’.

In a landmark judgment, the United States Supreme Court ruled that an employer’s decision regarding an employee’s job performance that was based on “gender stereotyping” was discriminatory and therefore illegal under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; and that a company could not refuse to promote an individual simply because that employee did not conform to stereotypical notions of how a woman should appear and behave in the workplace.

Need for US “Title VII” Legislation in India

Apparently the college indulged in ‘gender stereotyping’ as the academician was forced to resign because she failed to conform properly to institutional standards of ‘achieving womanhood’ on social media. Being on probation made his position even more precarious.

An important question that arises is: would a male counterpart in a similar position have faced the same level of scrutiny and moral policing from college authorities for posting photos to his social media account? ? Or was the professor treated like this just because of his “gender” and “age”?

Universities across the country need to think deeply about these relevant issues around “gender equality” and “sex and gender discrimination.” None can operate in a silo implementing its own set of norms and expectations based on traditional notions of gender roles. It is extremely necessary for educational institutions to define their code of conduct, gender role standards and disciplinary practices for their faculty members and students in accordance with the Sexual Harassment of Women in the Workplace (Prevention, Prohibition and Redress) Act 2013. There are far-reaching consequences to dealing with such sensitive issues in an ad hoc and informal manner.

There is also an urgent need for the Union government to step in and legislate through special legislation reflecting America’s Title VII and its own Transgender Persons (Protection of Rights) Act 2019; Sexual Harassment Act 2013; and Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, 1979to bring private sector organisations, corporate employers and educational institutions within the framework of fundamental rights and the application of gender equality.

“Gender Role Coercion” Has Negative Consequences for Employees

In by Pleck conception, gender role constraint can take the form of one of three theoretical subtypes:

  1. Gender role difference: An employee who is watched and reprimanded for posting her photos on social media may end up feeling unworthy, incomplete, and inferior to her docile colleagues.
  2. Gender Role Trauma: Employees who are put under constant surveillance could suffer from ‘alexithymia‘, a medical condition in which an individual lacks emotional quotient and is unable to put their emotions into words, nor their feelings into their work.
  3. Gender role dysfunction: The adaptation and internalization of gender norms by women leads to increased self-policing which leads to acute physical and psychological effects such as eating disorders, sexual dysfunctions, depression, anxiety about losing friends and rejection from the workplace.

Today’s women are no longer by Eliza Linton – the first salaried female journalist of the Victorian era – version of “charming women” who didn’t blur outlines or possess confusing qualities and had “no Amazon virtues…we don’t have Achilles before us in petticoats rather …a true Pyrrha or a more tender Deidamia…”

Institutions like St. Xavier’s College in Kolkata need to catch up.

Prerna Dhoop is Assistant Professor at the National School of India University, Bangalore, India.

Vandana Dhoop is an independent research consultant based in Kolkata.

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Mary Roy’s legacy will be her fight to ensure equal inheritance rights for Syrian Christian women, advancing gender justice https://cflweb.org/mary-roys-legacy-will-be-her-fight-to-ensure-equal-inheritance-rights-for-syrian-christian-women-advancing-gender-justice/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 22:42:14 +0000 https://cflweb.org/mary-roys-legacy-will-be-her-fight-to-ensure-equal-inheritance-rights-for-syrian-christian-women-advancing-gender-justice/ House Opinion Editorials Mary Roy’s legacy will be her fight to ensure equal inheritance rights for Syrian Christian women, advancing gender justice The renowned educator and activist, who died aged 89 this week, was the petitioner in a court case, Mary Roy against the state of Kerala, which has become a landmark in Indian legal […]]]>

The renowned educator and activist, who died aged 89 this week, was the petitioner in a court case, Mary Roy against the state of Kerala, which has become a landmark in Indian legal history.

In 1986, when the Supreme Court ruled in his favor, it cemented Roy’s role in pushing India down the path to greater gender equality.

It was anger at its value of being reduced to Rs 5,000 that propelled Mary Roy into her long and lonely battle for equal inheritance rights for Syrian Christian women in Kerala. The famous educator and activist, who died aged 89 this week, was the petitioner in a court case, Mary Roy v the State of Kerala, which became a landmark in Indian legal history and marked an important moment in the struggle for gender. justice in India.

Roy had a tumultuous life – she had come out of an unhappy marriage and raised her two children alone, and in an acrimonious battle fought her family in court for an equal share of the ancestral property. His courage and refusal to be bullied inspired the character of Ammu, the rebellious heart of his daughter Arundhati’s award-winning novel The God of Little Things. Later, Roy’s life saw some stability, especially with the success of his school, Pallikoodam, in his hometown of Kottayam.

While she came to be seen as a pillar of the Syrian-Catholic community, her path to this position was long and thorny. It was hard enough being a divorced, single-parent woman in a deeply conservative society: Roy’s isolation only deepened when in 1983 she filed a motion for an injunction in the Supreme Court, challenging the provisions of the Travancore Christian Succession Act of 1917, which had continued. to be applied to Syrian Christians after the former princely state became part of Kerala in 1956. According to the provisions of the law, if a man died intestate, any daughter he had would only be entitled to a quarter of the value of the inherited share. by the son or Rs 5,000, whichever is less. In 1986, when the Supreme Court ruled in his favor, it cemented Roy’s role in pushing India down the path to greater gender equality.

© The Indian Express (P) Ltd

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EQUL Great idea to close the gender investment gap https://cflweb.org/equl-great-idea-to-close-the-gender-investment-gap/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 14:09:23 +0000 https://cflweb.org/equl-great-idea-to-close-the-gender-investment-gap/ Gender investing is a relatively new phenomenon on the broader environmental, social and governance (ESG) scene, but it is a credible avenue for investors looking to take a proactive role in terms of investing in the improvement of various social inequalities. This task is made easier thanks to a new generation of exchange-traded funds, whose […]]]>

Gender investing is a relatively new phenomenon on the broader environmental, social and governance (ESG) scene, but it is a credible avenue for investors looking to take a proactive role in terms of investing in the improvement of various social inequalities.

This task is made easier thanks to a new generation of exchange-traded funds, whose ETF IQ Engender Equality (EQUL). EQUL is relevant at a time when more and more investors are pressuring companies to prioritize gender equality and some companies are responding to these demands.

“Companies are instrumental in advancing women because they can provide a safe and fair workplace for all employees; investors have a key role to play in ensuring they do. There are three topical areas that are on the minds of investors these days: reproductive freedom, pay equity, and gender parity in senior management and boards,” noted Gwen Le Berre, Director of Responsible Investment at Parametric.

Supporting the long-term case for EQUL is the fact that public companies with above-average gender diversity in the C-suite outperform their less diverse rivals. In other words, there are tangible benefits for companies that prioritize gender diversity. Along the same lines, an easy way for companies to boost gender diversity is to ensure that they close and eliminate gender pay gaps. Investors are asking for the same.

“Six shareholder proposals requesting reports on race- and gender-based pay gaps were voted on in 2022, with average investor support of 38%, a big increase from the 24% average of the last year. In fact, two of these proposals received majority support, one from Disney and the other from Lowe’s. Demonstrating the effectiveness of active ownership, Microsoft immediately committed to disclosing its ratio pay equity when 40% of its shareholders voted for a pay equity proposal last fall,” added Le Berre.

EQUL is also relevant on this front as its underlying index is designed to focus on “empowering women through equal pay and gender balance in leadership and the workforce”, depending on the issuer.

Conclusion: Gender-focused investing has ample room for growth, indicating that EQUL is a relevant consideration for socially responsible investors looking for long-term additions to their portfolio.

“Investors can help encourage progress within the companies in which they invest. This can be done either by voting for proposals and engaging with management to prioritize gender equality, or by investing with managers who do this important work on their behalf, Le Berre concluded.

For more news, insights and strategy visit the Double impact channel.

Opinions and predictions expressed herein are solely those of Tom Lydon and may not materialize. Information on this site should not be used or construed as an offer to sell, a solicitation of an offer to buy, or a recommendation for any product.

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Women’s Equality Day celebrated at MIER College of Education – Jammu and Kashmir Latest News | Tourism https://cflweb.org/womens-equality-day-celebrated-at-mier-college-of-education-jammu-and-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 21:46:18 +0000 https://cflweb.org/womens-equality-day-celebrated-at-mier-college-of-education-jammu-and-kashmir-latest-news-tourism/ Women‘s Equality Day.” title=”Members of the MIER Gender Champions Club during the celebration of Women’s Equality Day.”/>Members of the MIER Gender Champions Club during the celebration of Women’s Equality Day. Excelsior Correspondent JAMMU, August 29: The Shanti Gupta Center for Women‘s Studies, MIER College of Education commemorated ‘Women’s Equality Day’ by inaugurating the ‘Gender Champions […]]]>
Women‘s Equality Day.” title=”Members of the MIER Gender Champions Club during the celebration of Women’s Equality Day.”/>
Members of the MIER Gender Champions Club during the celebration of Women’s Equality Day.

Excelsior Correspondent

JAMMU, August 29: The Shanti Gupta Center for Women‘s Studies, MIER College of Education commemorated ‘Women’s Equality Day’ by inaugurating the ‘Gender Champions Club’.
Prof. Vishav Raksha, Head of Department of Sociology and Director of Center for Women’s Studies, University of Jammu, was the chief guest. Dr. Renu Gupta, President MIER, was the guest of honour.
Dr. Bharti Tandon, Facilitator and Nodal Teacher of the Gender Champions Club, gave a welcome speech while a documentary on the inspiring journey of the 15th President of India, Draupadi Murmu, was screened on the occasion.
Rupa Gupta, Director of the Center deliberated on the vision and mission of the Gender Champions Club and also outlined the roles and responsibilities that Gender Champions would fulfill in this position.
The Club was inaugurated with the lighting of the lamp and the pinning of badges to Gender Champions and club members. Club members are committed to promoting the cause of gender equality with sincerity and dedication. Two upcoming gender champions, Neha Sharma from the M Ed department and Surya Khajuria from B Ed Special Education delivered their opening remarks.
In his presidential remarks, Prof. Vishav Raksha pointed out that gender champions are our ambassadors who would advance the cause of gender equality as they would interact and sensitize individuals not only in educational institutions but also by transmitting this message at home. She added that even though we talk about gender equality, women still face challenges of patriarchy, stereotypes, occupational segregation, poor health care, legal rights, etc. , cybersecurity and the media.
Dr. Renu Gupta, President of MIER, said this year’s theme for Women’s Equality Day is “Hard Won-Not Done”, keeping in mind that gender equality is yet to be achieved. achieve in all areas. She emphasized that celebrating Women’s Equality Day gives us the opportunity to learn how other women in the past have fought for our rights. She commended the Gender Champions and Nodal teachers and gave them a 4C mantra that would help them work towards gender parity and neutrality i.e. awareness, interest, commitment and the competence.
A formal vote of thanks was presented by Jyoti Sharma, Nodal Teacher, Gender Champions Club and the program was led by Naman Mansotra.

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Emirates News Agency – Emirati Women’s Day recalls pride Emirati women bring to UAE: Fatima bint Mubarak https://cflweb.org/emirates-news-agency-emirati-womens-day-recalls-pride-emirati-women-bring-to-uae-fatima-bint-mubarak/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 08:38:56 +0000 https://cflweb.org/emirates-news-agency-emirati-womens-day-recalls-pride-emirati-women-bring-to-uae-fatima-bint-mubarak/ ABU DHABI, 27th August, 2022 (WAM) — H.H. Sheikha Fatima bint Mubarak, President of the General Women‘s Union (GWU), President of the Supreme Council for Motherhood and Childhood, Supreme President of the Foundation for the Development of the family (FDF), and the “Mother of the Nation”, said that Emirati Women’s Day, celebrated on August 28, […]]]>

ABU DHABI, 27th August, 2022 (WAM) — H.H. Sheikha Fatima bint Mubarak, President of the General Women‘s Union (GWU), President of the Supreme Council for Motherhood and Childhood, Supreme President of the Foundation for the Development of the family (FDF), and the “Mother of the Nation”, said that Emirati Women’s Day, celebrated on August 28, is a reminder of the pride and joy that Emirati women bring to the nation, to through their successes and their contributions to the achievements of the country.

In her speech marking the special occasion, Sheikha Fatima affirmed that the UAE and its leaders will continue to support women to achieve leadership and excellence, building on their firm belief in the invaluable role of women in society, highlighting the immense efforts of the insightful founding father, the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, in also supporting the education and empowerment of women, and their contributions to the sustainable development of the UAE.

“The late Sheikh Zayed worked tirelessly to support women, established women’s empowerment as a pillar of the country, and made the protection of women’s rights a strategic objective, through laws and legislation that support gender equality and promote it as common practice, while encouraging women’s empowerment, integration into the labor market and providing a safe and conducive environment for the development of their professional capacities,” he said. she explains.

Sheikha Fatima also highlighted the first steps taken towards women’s empowerment, in particular the establishment of the first women’s society in the United Arab Emirates, the Abu Dhabi Women’s Development Association, in 1973, which paved the way for future efforts to educate women and promote gender equality.

She further highlighted the efforts and initiatives of the GWU, which have reshaped the world of working women in the UAE by cementing a progressive approach that ensures the constant development of relevant practices, in line with international standards, to the point where the Gender equality has become a top priority for the UAE government, further contributing to supporting female talent and celebrating the creative productions of Emirati women across all sectors.

Talking about the great achievements of Emirati women, Sheikha Fatima explained that the Emirati woman has become a role model for women around the world, noting that the number of female members of the Federal National Council (FNC) has increased from 9 to 20 out of 40, accounting for 50 percent of the total, the world’s highest rate of women in parliament.

Women also hold 27% of UAE Cabinet seats, with the UAE having nine female ministers, she said, pointing out that women also make up about 30% of the total in the diplomatic service and 64% in government sectors. education and health, with 23,000 women. contractors managing projects with a total value of over AED 50 billion.

“I hope that every woman works to achieve their dreams and achieve excellence to help support their families and communities, and therefore, I would like to express my gratitude to all the women who have shown dedication to lead the development of their country and bring about a better future. I also salute the women who have worked to excel as members of their families or mothers who help raise the future generations of the world, Sheikh Fatima said, in conclusion.

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The Delta Record | Celebrate Women’s Equality Day https://cflweb.org/the-delta-record-celebrate-womens-equality-day/ Wed, 24 Aug 2022 22:59:55 +0000 https://cflweb.org/the-delta-record-celebrate-womens-equality-day/ Women‘s Equality Day is celebrated annually on August 26, falling on Friday that year. Most would agree that it is not easy to be a woman today or in the past. However, the women kept fighting and pushing forward. And with the latest legislative changes on abortion, contraception and more, it’s more vital than ever […]]]>

Women‘s Equality Day is celebrated annually on August 26, falling on Friday that year. Most would agree that it is not easy to be a woman today or in the past. However, the women kept fighting and pushing forward. And with the latest legislative changes on abortion, contraception and more, it’s more vital than ever to honor and celebrate Women’s Equality Day.

Women would not be where they are today if the brave women of years past had not fought tooth and nail for equal rights. Vantage Circle summed it up quite poetically in their statement: “Today we see female representatives in the military, in space, and as CEOs of Fortune corporations. But they had to endure many struggles to gain equal rights. Feminism as a wave has brought multiple changes in the lives of women around the world, but we cannot deny that suffragettes have reached the current position of women.

One of the most basic rights in a civilian democratic county is the right to vote, but women didn’t get the right to vote until 1920 as women represented themselves by raising their voices for equality voting rights. After the fight, the 19th Amendment was declared and gave rights to every American citizen, regardless of gender.

“This groundbreaking decision highlights the importance of Women’s Equality Day in today’s world. It celebrates the achievements of women’s rights activists and reminds us of the daily struggles women go through, as Vantage Circle noted. Women’s Equality Day is celebrated in the United States, but global platform Vantage Circle says, “We believe every global workplace should mark this occasion to show solidarity and support for women.”

The history of Women’s Equality Day begins with a return to the early 19th century. During this period, women were not allowed to inherit property and did not receive the same salary as their male counterparts. These issues led to the women’s suffrage movement, where women actively sought to have equality in political rights and representation.

Other countries, including Finland, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, had already granted women the right to vote in the 1900s. Soon this traveled to the United States but met with failure. Later, a turning point came after women’s participation in World War I as democratic battles unfolded in Europe as well as America.

“Constitutional amendments in the United States required the approval of two-thirds of the state. Thus, 36 of them ratified the 19th Amendment before it could pass. The deciding vote was in the hands of the Tennessee legislature named Harry T. Burn. He was a young state representative and received a call from his mother to support the amendment. His vote became the deciding factor and he changed his decision at the last minute,” as Vantage Circle stated.

And although this historic decision gave women the right to vote, there is still today a fight for equal rights among the gender pay gap when it is still clear that there is gender discrimination, workplace harassment and more in many companies.

Women’s Equality Day became official in 1973 following a bill introduced two years earlier by Bella Abzug, who was a representative in New York. Congress has designated August 26 as Women’s Equality Day to “remember the struggles of women in the past, present and future.”

Vantage Circle came up with ways to celebrate Women’s Equality Day, including the following.

1. Introduce a mentorship program

Despite all the efforts made by women, more men are occupying high-level positions. Until May 2018, Fortune 500 companies had only 24 female CEOs, accounting for just 5% of the total number of positions.

With this in mind, we believe that orientation helps make a difference and encourages workers to strive for success. All you need is a mentorship program where workers connect with their higher authorities and discuss career goals, networking, education, and other opportunities for success. Women should see other women as mentors. This will make them feel more empowered about their abilities. Representation matters a lot!

The involvement of women in leadership is essential to the growth of the company in 2022. For this, it is essential that great leaders support, empower and listen to women in our workplaces.

2. Encourage girl power

It is high time, as a manager or leader, to think about improving the lives of young women in the community. In August, you can show your support for women’s rights by encouraging more and more opportunities for women. Here are some ways to promote girl power:

• Set up an internship program specific to women

• Invite middle school and high school girls to observation or side-barging internships

• Introduce STEM careers to a Girl Scout troop

• Offer a college scholarship to your best employees who wish to pursue higher education.

This helps improve diversity and inclusion in your company, promoting fairness in the workplace and improving company culture.

3. Help a cause

In this post-modern world, women’s suffrage is limited to social media alone, but many modern causes need compassionate supporters.

This Women’s Equality Day, volunteer as a team and make it a team building activity. Present a project and discuss its execution. Make the project women-centric – a great initiative to promote awareness and team cohesion.

Here are some projects to imagine and work on as a team:

• You can visit schools or join students in their online classes and do a reading session on gender studies.

• Organize a blood donation camp

• Consider doing charity for homeless women

• Organize luncheons with women leaders in your region

4. Listen to women

Are you wondering how to improve the working conditions of female staff in your company? Well, all you have to do is ask!

Many complaints of harassment, discrimination at work, subjugation go unnoticed or are not even filed. This is because of the social stigma and humiliation attached to it. To solve such uncomfortable situations for women and call predators to work, you need to listen to them. And you can do it in an innovative and confidential way. Here are some possible ways:

• Create a suggestion box

• Set up a designated complaints box for sexual harassment

• Conduct employee surveys

• Collect individual input on ways to improve job satisfaction and safety for women at work.

5. Update Library

Education and awareness is the best way to celebrate equal rights! And nothing beats reading some great feminist authors on Women’s Equality Day to help everyone reset their patriarchal worldview.

Reading is a mindful and relaxing activity that helps you connect with the outside world. So, to help you connect with feminism and women’s rights, here are some fantastic books that will give you some insight into gender equality.

• “We should all be feminists” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

• “Broad influence” by Jay Newton-Small

• “Women, Race and Class” by Angela Davis

• “Dear Ijeawele, or a feminist manifesto in fifteen suggestions” by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

6. Shout

Finally, to mark Women’s Equality Day, you can simply spread the word and advertise the occasion to get the needed attention. Bring it to social media and your internal portals. Change your logo to support the event and ask your design team to come up with cool ideas.

Also, you can organize a fun quiz among team members. For example, ask them to guess the year women got the right to vote in the United States. Only a few will succeed, we bet!

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