Gender Equality – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ Fri, 11 Jun 2021 16:45:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://cflweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Gender Equality – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ 32 32 Government of Canada invests $ 1.3 million in three organizations supporting women in Newfoundland and Labrador https://cflweb.org/government-of-canada-invests-1-3-million-in-three-organizations-supporting-women-in-newfoundland-and-labrador/ https://cflweb.org/government-of-canada-invests-1-3-million-in-three-organizations-supporting-women-in-newfoundland-and-labrador/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 16:30:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/government-of-canada-invests-1-3-million-in-three-organizations-supporting-women-in-newfoundland-and-labrador/ ST. JOHN’S, NL, June 11, 2021 / CNW / – A strong and vibrant women’s and equality movement is part of the foundation for a more inclusive society Canada – one where everyone has the opportunity to succeed. The government of Canada continues to support organizations that ensure that all women, as well as victims […]]]>


ST. JOHN’S, NL, June 11, 2021 / CNW / – A strong and vibrant women’s and equality movement is part of the foundation for a more inclusive society Canada – one where everyone has the opportunity to succeed. The government of Canada continues to support organizations that ensure that all women, as well as victims and survivors of human trafficking, have the tools and support they need to heal and take back control of their lives. By investing in women’s organizations, the government of Canada helps ensure that women and their communities can thrive now and in the future.

Today, the Honorable Seamus O’Regan Jr., Minister of Natural Resources, on behalf of the Honorable Maryam Monsef, Minister for Women, Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development, announced funding of 1 , $ 3 million for three community organizations Newfoundland and Labrador who support women.

Through the Women’s Program, the Multicultural Women’s Organization of Newfoundland and Labrador and the Newfoundland and the Labrador Women Entrepreneurs Organization will each receive $ 450,000 to address organizational capacity and promote social and systemic change towards gender equality.

As part of the Human Trafficking Initiative, the Association for New Canadians will receive $ 400,000 advance knowledge and enhance empowerment supports through promising intervention practices for populations at risk, as well as victims and survivors of human trafficking across the province.

Funding announced today will help these organizations increase their capacity to continue to support women and girls, as well as victims and survivors of human trafficking in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Quote

“We invest $ 1.3 million in local organizations that empower women across our province. This is how we are recovering from this pandemic in a way that works for everyone, especially the hardest hit. We will build a more inclusive, sustainable and resilient economy right here at Newfoundland and Labrador. ”

The Honorable Seamus O’Regan Jr., Minister of Natural Resources

Fast facts

  • Since 2015, Women and Gender Equality Canada has supported more than 220 projects aimed at preventing and combating gender-based violence and more than 190 projects in support of women’s economic security, including 26 projects in the Newfoundland and Labrador.
  • It is estimated that projects funded by Women and Gender Equality Canada reached approximately six million people in 2019-2020, reducing barriers in the areas of economic equality and gender-based violence, and building capacity and confidence in areas of leadership.
  • In june 2020, Canada has been recognized by CARE as having the most gender-sensitive plan to deal with COVID-19.
  • Despite strong laws and global protocols, it has been estimated that human trafficking generates around 150 billion dollars per year in criminal profits around the world. It disproportionately affects women and children. In Canada, 95% of the victims identified by the police are women and girls.
  • To ensure that anyone facing gender-based violence has reliable and timely access to protection and services, no matter where they live, Budget 2021 invested $ 601.3 million over five years to move towards a new National Action Plan to End Gender-Based Violence. This includes increased funding for initiatives to end human trafficking.

Related links

Follow Women and Gender Equality Canada:

SOURCE Women and Gender Equality Canada

For further information: Marie-Pier Baril, Press Secretary, Office of the Minister for Women, Gender Equality and Rural Economic Development, 613-295-8123; Media Relations, Women and Gender Equality Canada, 1-855-969-9922

Related links

http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/



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“Success at the Generation Equality Forum is when we are able to translate gender equality from a concept or policy into reality” https://cflweb.org/success-at-the-generation-equality-forum-is-when-we-are-able-to-translate-gender-equality-from-a-concept-or-policy-into-reality/ https://cflweb.org/success-at-the-generation-equality-forum-is-when-we-are-able-to-translate-gender-equality-from-a-concept-or-policy-into-reality/#respond Thu, 10 Jun 2021 17:36:18 +0000 https://cflweb.org/success-at-the-generation-equality-forum-is-when-we-are-able-to-translate-gender-equality-from-a-concept-or-policy-into-reality/ UN Women Mavic Cabrera Balleza. Photo: GNWP / Katrina Leclerc Mavic Cabrera Balleza is the Founder and CEO of the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP). She also represents the Generation Equality Compact Forum on Women, Peace and Security and Humanitarian Action (WPS-HA), leading actions and resources to accelerate progress on the WPS-HA agenda. Balleza […]]]>


UN Women

Mavic Cabrera Balleza. Photo: GNWP / Katrina Leclerc

Mavic Cabrera Balleza is the Founder and CEO of the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP). She also represents the Generation Equality Compact Forum on Women, Peace and Security and Humanitarian Action (WPS-HA), leading actions and resources to accelerate progress on the WPS-HA agenda. Balleza prioritizes localizing national action plans on women, peace and security, and gender-sensitive humanitarian action to ensure they meet the needs of local communities and marginalized groups.

What has been the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on women, peace and security, and humanitarian action?

The COVID-19 pandemic is a multiplier of conflicts and crises. It has exacerbated the root causes of conflicts and crises, including economic inequalities, food insecurity and the unavailability of basic social services such as health care and education. The pandemic has also exacerbated gender inequalities, which are one of the main drivers of conflict. Lockdowns during the pandemic have led to an unprecedented increase in the incidence of sexual and gender-based violence.

The pandemic has blocked the implementation of peace processes. Implementation plans which require the participation of government agencies and local populations and the use of financial resources have been drawn up. Funds allocated to the peacebuilding programs of many civil society organizations have been misappropriated to support emergency health and humanitarian response.

The shortage of medical facilities, vaccines and supplies amid new variants of the coronavirus shows that the pandemic will continue to impact our lives, including our peacebuilding efforts and humanitarian action.

Why is now the time to step up Women, Peace and Security Commitments?

At the start of the pandemic, women and young peacemakers were on the front lines. They were the first to visit communities affected by conflict, refugee camps and camps for internally displaced people, distributing relief materials and factual information on preventing the spread of COVID. -19. However, they remain unrecognized, underfunded and excluded from decision making. To make matters worse, they face attacks and repression from authoritarian governments and armed groups who have used the global health crisis to gain more power.

This is a critical time for the Compact to accelerate WPS-HA commitments. To do this, the Pact must call on policy makers, especially governments, to ensure the participation of local women and youth in peace negotiations and the implementation of peace agreements – and to link formal peace processes and informal. The Compact must also encourage the long-established humanitarian system to rethink humanitarian response so that crisis-affected populations do not remain voiceless as beneficiaries of relief goods and services, but are empowered to participate in decision-making.

The Compact should work with donors to review their funding policies. We must advocate and contribute to at least a fivefold increase in direct aid to local women’s and youth organizations. We must also ensure funding for national and local action plans on WPS and other relevant national mechanisms on WPS-HA.

What are the most urgent changes in WPS-HA, and why?

Local women and youth have a deep understanding of their countries’ peace and security situation, gender and power relations, and humanitarian needs, as they experience this reality every day. When local people are able to shape the implementation of the peace, security and humanitarian aid agenda, it becomes inclusive, participatory, intersectional and fosters strong ownership (of local communities).

We must empower local women and youth to design and implement humanitarian responses and commitments to women, peace and security in order to respond effectively to violent conflict, the pandemic, and the crisis. other humanitarian crises. To facilitate this, experts need to transfer their skills and knowledge and share their resources so that local people can carry out their own initiatives. As a Compact, we must honor the agency, commitment and passion of local communities and engage Member States and the donor community to provide funding to local actors in a predictable and transparent manner.

What inspired the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP) to become a board member of the Compact on WPS-HA?

We are tired of increasing levels of conflict, insecurity for women and girls, and global military spending on the one hand, and endless commitments with no tangible impact on the other. It has been twenty years since the historic United Nations Security Council resolution 1325 on women, peace and security was passed, but we have seen little progress and are suffering from political fatigue.

GNWP wants everyone – Member States, the United Nations, regional organizations, the private sector and the donor community – to recognize, value and support civil society, including through funding. We want governments to ensure our security and protection as we work together to turn the commitments of the past decades into action. This is why the Compact’s unique large composition is important; it will ensure a more inclusive and bolder, but realistic, vision of the Pact over the next five years.

What is success at Generation Equality Forum looks like you?

Success at the Generation Equality Forum is when we are able to translate gender equality from a concept or policy into reality. This will only be possible if all of us who are now active in the Forum leave our echo chambers, talk with people in the streets, in schools, in factories and offices, in grocery stores, in markets, in local communities, and explain what gender equality is about. Most of them will probably hear about gender equality for the first time, but that would be our first indicator of success. We should then follow these initial conversations with more in-depth discussions and collective and transformative actions.

For this to happen, as members of the Compact and leaders of the Coalition of Action, we must ensure that women, young women, girls and LGBTQI + people around the world – including those living in conflict and crisis – are truly included in decision-making. do on the priority issues of the Generation Equality Forum. This is the only way to ensure that the outcomes of the Forum meet their urgent priorities and needs. This is what success looks like to me.

/ Public distribution. This material is from the original organization and may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. See it in full here.



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NCAA can do better when it comes to gender equality https://cflweb.org/ncaa-can-do-better-when-it-comes-to-gender-equality/ https://cflweb.org/ncaa-can-do-better-when-it-comes-to-gender-equality/#respond Wed, 09 Jun 2021 16:47:53 +0000 https://cflweb.org/ncaa-can-do-better-when-it-comes-to-gender-equality/ OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma softball coach Patty Gasso has had enough. Her Sooners round off another dynamic season when they face Florida State in the final of the top three Women’s College World Series this week. But lately, she has more in mind than winning between the lines. About a month ago, she entered the […]]]>


OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma softball coach Patty Gasso has had enough.

Her Sooners round off another dynamic season when they face Florida State in the final of the top three Women’s College World Series this week. But lately, she has more in mind than winning between the lines.

About a month ago, she entered the NCAA for its WCWS format. She pointed out that the Men’s College World Series runs for almost two weeks and does not include doubles programs while the women’s tournament lasts no longer than a week and requires multiple teams to play doubles. She said the current format is a health risk to her players and that she has been uncomfortable at times with the way she has had to use pitchers while winning her four national titles.

Gasso’s anger was raised again this week after the states of Florida and Oklahoma played a WCWS game that started around midnight and did not end until after 2 a.m. on Sunday. Although a delay due to the rain delayed things, she felt the situation could have been avoided. In the men’s World Series there are more days off and more flexibility in the schedules.

“It is very uncomfortable when we talk to our players about standing up for what is right, yet what is happening around us is not fair,” said Gasso. “And the players will do whatever you want them to do. They are not going to complain. They’re going to go to bed at three, wake up at seven, because it’s the World Series. But that’s not the memory they need.

If this sounds familiar to you, it should be: There was strong criticism of the inequalities between the men’s and women’s basketball tournaments earlier this year. Similar complaints were raised a few weeks later about the NCAA Women’s Volleyball Tournament.

Now softball is doing its math.

There is a lot of energy behind this year’s WCWS, which returned after being canceled last year due to the pandemic. A $ 27.5 million project that Oklahoma City voters approved in 2017 has been completed, and the USA Softball Hall of Fame has new top decks that have increased seating from 9,000 to 13. 000, as well as improved changing rooms and other equipment.

The men’s and women’s World Series events got similar ratings in 2019 and the ratings are still good this year for WCWS, according to ESPN.

Just having more than women’s softball had before is no longer enough.

“I think softball is ready to explode, and I just hope we can get that across to the NCAA and look at some of the inequalities that are still involved in women’s sport,” said Mike Candrea, retired coach of Arizona. “And I think they need to be changed because we have a great product.”

The NCAA declined an interview request for this story, saying it wanted to stay focused on the athletes. Joni Comstock, senior vice president of the NCAA Championships, said the Division I softball committee that manages the format and programming includes active coaches and administrators from across the country.

There are questions, and not just about planning. Women do not have a shower at the USA Softball Hall of Fame Stadium. And Gasso pointed out ahead of the tournament that there are no indoor batting facilities for women.

Men have these things.

“Oklahoma City did that by increasing the number of seats and you’re going to get that wow factor (at the stadium),” Gasso said. “But there are still things behind the scenes that need to be worked on, and they will. I know they will. We are in the right direction, without a doubt.

The NCAA made a change on Sunday. When another weather delay increased the potential for two very late games, they were moved to Monday and the championship series was postponed by one day to Tuesday.

Matthew Holmes, NCAA assistant director for championships and alliances, said it was an independent decision unrelated to the long night that dragged on Sunday. He said the games were moved because the softball committee did not want those games to potentially be split into separate days, giving one runner-up a day off while the other played in an elimination game.

Coaches believe permanent changes are needed. Florida State coach Lonni Alameda said the schedule makes players inferior to their best, which means viewers are getting less product.

“I really want to be a part of this discussion because I know that in our sport we will play until all hours, we will do whatever is necessary because we are a blue collar sport,” she said. declared. “But on the other hand, when we have something this great, we have to protect it and take care of it. This conversation must therefore begin. Now that I’ve been through it, I can move this conversation forward.



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End all legal barriers to abortion, say key European politicians | Reproductive rights https://cflweb.org/end-all-legal-barriers-to-abortion-say-key-european-politicians-reproductive-rights/ https://cflweb.org/end-all-legal-barriers-to-abortion-say-key-european-politicians-reproductive-rights/#respond Wed, 09 Jun 2021 05:30:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/end-all-legal-barriers-to-abortion-say-key-european-politicians-reproductive-rights/ Ministers from five European countries, including Belgian Prime Minister Alexander de Croo, are among 29 politicians, health and women’s rights activists who signed an open letter calling for the removal of all legal obstacles to abortion. The letter, signed by the Ministers of Gender and Equality of France, Canada and Norway, and the Ministers of […]]]>


Ministers from five European countries, including Belgian Prime Minister Alexander de Croo, are among 29 politicians, health and women’s rights activists who signed an open letter calling for the removal of all legal obstacles to abortion.

The letter, signed by the Ministers of Gender and Equality of France, Canada and Norway, and the Ministers of International Development of Sweden and the Netherlands, declares that women’s right to a safe and legal abortion is eroded by disinformation and attacks on services. He calls for the reopening of abortion clinics closed during the pandemic.

The signatories say abortion should be seen as an essential health service and call for a global campaign of “factual and unbiased information” so that women and girls know their rights and understand their options.

Posted on Wednesday by the SheDecides movement, the letter calls for an end to mandatory abortion counseling, implementation of upcoming revised World Health Organization guidelines, and approval of the inducing drug mifepristone. abortion, in countries where it is not yet available.

“No woman should be forced to carry an unwanted pregnancy to term; and no woman should die as a result of pregnancy or childbirth. The foundation for a just and equal world for women and girls in all their diversity is the right to decide about their own bodies. Every woman, everywhere, has the right to a safe and legal abortion, maternal and midwifery health care, comprehensive sexuality education and contraception, ”the letter said.

“But today, all over the world, women and girls are routinely denied full access to their sexual and reproductive rights and freedoms. The disproportionate impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, particularly on the economic empowerment of women, and the increase in sexual and gender-based violence, make the need to ensure gender equality more urgent than ever. “

Anti-abortion campaigns are often “led by well-funded and well-organized pressure groups” around the world, the letter continues.

“Their most visible vanguard are the protesters who stand outside clinics, intimidating and harassing women and girls seeking essential health services. But they also operate behind the scenes, working with anti-abortion groups and politicians to spread disinformation and force a crippling effect on women’s rights. “

The letter adds: “By campaigning to remove legal barriers and protect abortion as an essential health service, we can prevent unsafe abortions, save women’s lives and take a further step towards achieving it. gender equality.

The SheDecides movement was started in 2017 by Lilianne Ploumen, former Dutch trade minister and letter signatory, in response to cuts to reproductive health services by the Trump administration.

In the UK, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline on 0808 2000 247 or visit Women’s Aid. Other international helplines can be found via www.befrienders.org



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Debra Allcock Tyler: Flexible working could roll back gender equality by decades https://cflweb.org/debra-allcock-tyler-flexible-working-could-roll-back-gender-equality-by-decades/ https://cflweb.org/debra-allcock-tyler-flexible-working-could-roll-back-gender-equality-by-decades/#respond Tue, 08 Jun 2021 07:45:42 +0000 https://cflweb.org/debra-allcock-tyler-flexible-working-could-roll-back-gender-equality-by-decades/ I have always been interested in the science of unintended consequences. One of my favorite examples is road signs and crosswalks. It turns out that there is some evidence that it makes the roads less safe. For example, a study on a busy road showed that the number of accidents was reduced by 60% after […]]]>


I have always been interested in the science of unintended consequences. One of my favorite examples is road signs and crosswalks.

It turns out that there is some evidence that it makes the roads less safe. For example, a study on a busy road showed that the number of accidents was reduced by 60% after the removal of some traffic lights.

We introduced things like road signs, traffic lights, and crosswalks because we thought it would make our roads safer. Common sense, right?

But it seems the opposite is true. No sign means fewer accidents.

The unintended consequence of visible traffic signs is that they make roads less safe – counterintuitive.

Whenever I come across something that seems both logical and the right thing to do, I immediately pay attention to the unintended consequences. Which brings me to today’s conversations about flexible working.

The pandemic has undoubtedly forced changes in working practices in the office, which means that many office workers no longer have to operate in an “office-Monday to Friday nine to five” culture.

It has also resulted in a more equitable distribution of tasks at home. Men, like it or not (and, in all fairness, many say they liked it), were allowed to be more involved in housework, childcare and care. This is clearly a good thing for fair parenting.

Now we are seeing flexible ways of working, where home and work can be better aligned for people, being embraced by many organizations. And we embrace it because it seems the logical and right thing to do.

But, like traffic signs, I foresee possible accidents to come.

I vividly remember a study from the University of California in the 1980s. It was done around the time when women started struggling for a better work-life balance and wanted to include men.

The study asked men about their attitudes towards work-life balance. To my surprise, it turned out that the majority of men, when allowed to respond anonymously, thought their work-life balance was good, despite long office hours.

According to the survey, they didn’t want to spend more time at home doing housework, feeding the children, or struggling with bedtime.

Has men’s attitudes changed since? Well, given that most current studies still show that women still bear the burden of family responsibilities disproportionately, I’m not sure they have it. (Please don’t #NotAllMen me!)

I recently read an article on the BBC website referring to a recent survey of 2,300 office workers in the UK which showed that 69% of mothers wanted to work from home at least once a week after the pandemic, against only 56% of fathers.

So this passion for new flexibility, while very appealing on the surface, could have the unintended consequences of pushing equality back decades.

If mothers work from home more often than fathers and employers allow people to do whatever they want, what could this mean for gender balance in the physical workplace?

If we simply allow reckless and unmanaged flexibility, will we end up with a male dominated physical workspace, with all the advantages that this brings on careers and opportunities?

Will we see the pay, positions and power favoring the men because they’re in the room, going to meetings together, sharing ideas by the kettle, walking into the pub when they get home?

We, as a sector, should think long and hard about the unintended consequences of the new labor flexibility.

Don’t get me wrong: this is better than the old ways and we should, indeed, have to embrace it – but not without being very careful about how it can harm women and what we can do. to avoid this.

At the very least, we need to track which demographic in our charity has requested home / work flexibility, and who accepts it.

We need to ask ourselves what we can do to prevent workspaces from being dominated by men, with all the benefits that this confers, such as greater access to senior leaders.

Are our paternity rights fair? Are we encouraging male staff to work from home as much as female staff? Are we watching him?

What about our promotion criteria and process? Do we have ways in place to ensure that office workers don’t get a benefit one way or another?

Can we work on the unconscious biases about how we might view those who are physically present, versus those who are physically distant?

The unintended consequence of road signs is less safe roads. The unintended consequence of flexible working could mean a less favorable working environment for women.

We can potentially avoid it if we remain vigilant.

Debra Allcock Tyler is Executive Director of the Directory of Social Change



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Conflict Trends 2021/1 – Women’s Participation in Peacebuilding Efforts in Africa: A Review of Recent Academic Contributions – World https://cflweb.org/conflict-trends-2021-1-womens-participation-in-peacebuilding-efforts-in-africa-a-review-of-recent-academic-contributions-world/ https://cflweb.org/conflict-trends-2021-1-womens-participation-in-peacebuilding-efforts-in-africa-a-review-of-recent-academic-contributions-world/#respond Mon, 07 Jun 2021 11:35:42 +0000 https://cflweb.org/conflict-trends-2021-1-womens-participation-in-peacebuilding-efforts-in-africa-a-review-of-recent-academic-contributions-world/ By Jenny Nortvedt As we move into the next decade of the Women, Peace and Security agenda, it is important to review relevant research and focus on the participation of women in peacebuilding efforts. introduction The year 2020 marked the 20th anniversary of the unanimous adoption of United Nations Security Council (UN) resolution 1325 on […]]]>


By Jenny Nortvedt

As we move into the next decade of the Women, Peace and Security agenda, it is important to review relevant research and focus on the participation of women in peacebuilding efforts.

introduction

The year 2020 marked the 20th anniversary of the unanimous adoption of United Nations Security Council (UN) resolution 1325 on women, peace and security; 25 years since the World Conference on Women in Beijing; and the conclusion of the African Women’s Decade. Since 2000, the UN has adopted 10 subsequent resolutions and several strategies within the normative framework of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda. On the African continent, the African Union (AU) and its Member States have promoted the WPS agenda through several legal guidelines, training manuals and normative frameworks, including Aspiration 6 of Agenda 2063, the Solemn Declaration on gender equality in Africa (2004), The Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa (2003) and the AU Gender Policy (2009) . In addition, in 2016, more than 19 AU Member States adopted Resolution 1325 of the National Action Plans and in 2018 the AU adopted the Regional Strategy for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women. women (2018-2028).[2]Yet despite progress in many areas, progress in the meaningful participation of women in peacebuilding efforts and the promotion of gender equality in peace and security has been slow.[3]

Since the adoption of Resolution 1325 and subsequent resolutions, which now constitute the normative framework of the WPS, an abundant literature has emerged. The literature has focused on some key thematic areas – participation, protection, prevention and gender perspectives – which to a large extent reflect the four main pillars of UNSCR 1325. In 2018, The Oxford Handbook of Women, Peace and Security examined the growing number of academics. and political contributions to the WPS agenda over the past two decades and have highlighted the remaining challenges.[4] Therefore, the recent anniversary provides an opportunity to continue on this path and take stock of recent and ongoing empirical studies and emerging topics within the WPS agenda. This review explores (1) recent academic and political contributions to the WPS agenda on the African continent from 2017, with a particular focus on participation; and (2) new relevant contributions addressing emerging challenges to women’s participation in peacebuilding efforts.

There have been several reviews regarding the operationalization and implementation of the goals set out in Resolution 1325 by the UN and AU, and in academic communities – for example, the AU Commission review ; Implementation of the Agenda for Women, Peace and Security in Africa; the Continental Results Framework: Monitoring and Reporting on the Implementation of the Agenda for Women, Peace and Security in Africa (2018-2028);[5] the review Women, Peace and Security – Implementation of the Maputo Protocol in Africa (2016),[6] the recent ten-year review of the AU Peace and Security Council’s Women, Peace and Security program (2020)[7] and the 2015 United Nations review, including the United Nations Global Study.[8] However, the main focus of this article is a review of academic contributions over the past few years, in order to assess the empirical basis for the next decade of the WPS agenda.



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Meghan and Prince Harry welcome their second child https://cflweb.org/meghan-and-prince-harry-welcome-their-second-child/ https://cflweb.org/meghan-and-prince-harry-welcome-their-second-child/#respond Sun, 06 Jun 2021 16:21:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/meghan-and-prince-harry-welcome-their-second-child/ Originally Posted: JUNE 06, 21 12:01 ET By Max Foster and Lauren Said-Moorhouse, CNN (CNN) – Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex has given birth to a daughter, the second child for her and Prince Harry, a Sussex spokesperson told CNN. “It is with great joy that Prince Harry and Meghan, The Duke and Duchess of […]]]>


Originally Posted: JUNE 06, 21 12:01 ET

By Max Foster and Lauren Said-Moorhouse, CNN

(CNN) – Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex has given birth to a daughter, the second child for her and Prince Harry, a Sussex spokesperson told CNN.

“It is with great joy that Prince Harry and Meghan, The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, welcome their daughter, Lilibet” Lili “Diana Mountbatten-Windsor, to the world.”

“Lili was born Friday, June 4 at 11:40 a.m. under the trusted care of doctors and staff at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital,” the statement said, adding that the new arrival weighed 7 pounds 11 ounces and that “both mothers and the child are in good health and well and are settling in at home. “

“Lili is named after her great-grandmother, Her Majesty the Queen, whose family nickname is Lilibet. Her middle name, Diana, was chosen to honor her beloved late grandmother, the Princess of Wales.” , adds the press release.

Baby Lili is the sister of the couple’s two-year-old son Archie Harrison.

Harry and Meghan revealed they are expecting a girl during their revealing interview with Oprah Winfrey, which aired in March.

The newborn is the eleventh great-grandchild of the Queen. She is eighth on the throne behind her grandfather Charles, her uncle William, her three children (George, Charlotte and Louis), her father Harry and her big brother Archie.

Her birth in the United States makes her the oldest royal in the line to be born abroad.

It also makes her a dual US-UK citizen – meaning the youngest of Sussexes could potentially become President of the United States when she grows up – while also being in line with the British throne.

Meghan and Harry kept the pregnancy as private as possible, only talking a few times about their daughter’s imminent arrival.

One of those occasions was a pre-recorded message from Meghan for the recent Vax Live concert in May, which she and Harry co-chaired.

“My husband and I are delighted to welcome a daughter soon – it is a feeling of joy that we share with millions of other families around the world,” the Duchess told the audience at the event, intended to promote equity in the Covid-19 vaccine and gender equality.

“When we think of her, we think of all the young women and girls around the world who must have the capacity and the support to move us forward,” she said. “Their future leadership depends on the decisions we make and the actions we take now to put them in place, and prepare us all, for a successful, equitable and compassionate future.”

The royal couple announced they were expecting an addition to their family in February, sharing a black and white photo of them looking at each other, as Meghan cradled her baby.

The photo was taken by Misan Harriman, a Nigerian-born British photographer and friend of the couple, who took the photo remotely from his London home.

The timing of their Valentine’s Day announcement was likely of particular significance to the couple, coming almost exactly 37 years to the day after Prince Charles and Princess Diana revealed they were expecting their second child: Prince Harry.

Meghan previously revealed she miscarried last summer in a moving opinion piece for The New York Times.

Their newborn daughter has the right to be a lady from birth, but will likely not use the title, but instead use the name (given name) Mountbatten-Windsor.

When Archie Harrison was born in 2019, the Duke and Duchess chose to relinquish the titles and indicated that they would not use his father’s second peerage title, the Earl of Dumbarton.

None of the Sussex children are currently eligible to use HRH titles, according to the rules set out by George V in the 1917 Letters Patent. However, that will change when their grandfather Charles takes the throne.

As to whether Archie and his little sister will be joined by other siblings in the future, that doesn’t appear to be on the cards at this time.

Harry revealed that he and his wife are likely to limit their brood to “two, maximum” while discussing the Earth’s dwindling resources with activist and chimpanzee expert Jane Goodall for a special edition of British Vogue in July latest.

Harry and Meghan tied the knot in a lavish wedding at St. George’s Chapel in Windsor, England three years ago.

They stepped down from their roles as royals last year, relinquishing their HRH titles and now live in Santa Barbara, California.

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Vernon women’s group says normalize gender parity – Lake Country Calendar https://cflweb.org/vernon-womens-group-says-normalize-gender-parity-lake-country-calendar/ https://cflweb.org/vernon-womens-group-says-normalize-gender-parity-lake-country-calendar/#respond Sat, 05 Jun 2021 17:30:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/vernon-womens-group-says-normalize-gender-parity-lake-country-calendar/ We all know that women are under-represented in almost every category of leadership. And each of us, in our own way, works to overcome obstacles in our way. But beyond our individual needs and motivations, have you wondered why it is important for society as a whole that gender parity becomes the norm rather than […]]]>


We all know that women are under-represented in almost every category of leadership. And each of us, in our own way, works to overcome obstacles in our way. But beyond our individual needs and motivations, have you wondered why it is important for society as a whole that gender parity becomes the norm rather than the exception?

It’s because women make great leaders!

Women have natural and learned abilities that benefit the places where we work. Women tend to lean more naturally towards a cooperative and collaborative work environment rather than a top-down model of leadership.

These are not stereotypical statements. There are articles and studies that attest to this.

It is now recognized that good leaders have, among other attributes, a balanced set of soft skills, sometimes referred to as emotional intelligence. These skills include adaptability, a positive attitude, empathy, mentoring, conflict management, a consensus and collaborative approach, and teamwork. You might think you don’t have these skills, but take a closer look and don’t sell yourself short.

In 2015, when asked to explain his joint cabinet, Justin Trudeau replied: “Because we are in 2015! And he appointed another cabinet for gender equality in 2019. It seemed like it was obvious that NOW is the time for gender equality.

For society, this means not only at the highest level of government, but at all levels in our workplaces. Women represent half of the population and are also expected to occupy half of managerial positions in various sectors of the economy.

The need for a more diverse, and therefore better, model of leadership is necessary for the success of businesses and organizations so that their structures more closely reflect the society to which they serve.

If it is recognized that women have the skills, why have more of them not translated into leadership roles?

One reason may be that women have generally not had access to the avenues used by men to progress, especially the former “men’s clubs”, whether they are of a recreational, organizational or professional nature.

What is going on in these male strongholds of power?

Besides the social aspect, it is clear that what is going on is professional networking, role model and mentoring.

Women must create these avenues for themselves. Women need the support of other women to be successful.

We can frame. We can help a colleague to improve her position, give her some advice. We recognize that each of us is a role model for someone (maybe a son or daughter, a student, a colleague). We can help newcomers network.

One organization that offers these various opportunities is Vernon Women in Business. Check it out on vwib.com. There are others. Look for them – or create them!

In addition to the personal supports above, more concrete infrastructure is needed. This includes affordable childcare, paid parental leave, guarantees to return to previous positions once maternity leave has run out, and opportunities for training and development.

The progress of these measures will in part be achieved through the collaboration of women to advocate for improvements at all levels of government. Organizations such as the Canadian Federation of Women Graduates of Vernon Universities provide a vehicle for this. Let’s see what we can do to accelerate progress. Collectively, we can do it.

We are not all Dragons Den panelists, but we can lead by example, work hard and cooperate.

It’s time to step over the glass ceiling!

The Canadian Federation of University Women (CFWU) Vernon is a local voluntary organization that welcomes all women who promote, defend and encourage women.



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President of Kenya pledges millions to tackle outbreak of gender-based violence https://cflweb.org/president-of-kenya-pledges-millions-to-tackle-outbreak-of-gender-based-violence/ https://cflweb.org/president-of-kenya-pledges-millions-to-tackle-outbreak-of-gender-based-violence/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 12:00:26 +0000 https://cflweb.org/president-of-kenya-pledges-millions-to-tackle-outbreak-of-gender-based-violence/ By Nita Bhalla NAIROBI, May 28 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – The President of Kenya on Friday pledged millions of dollars in public funds to help tackle an upsurge in gender-based violence during the pandemic, outlining plans to open shelters for women across the country and improve the police. Uhuru Kenyatta said crime statistics showed cases […]]]>


By Nita Bhalla

NAIROBI, May 28 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – The President of Kenya on Friday pledged millions of dollars in public funds to help tackle an upsurge in gender-based violence during the pandemic, outlining plans to open shelters for women across the country and improve the police.

Uhuru Kenyatta said crime statistics showed cases of violence against women almost doubled between January and June 2020 compared to the previous year.

“The closures during the COVID-19 pandemic and the social and economic impacts of the pandemic have increased women’s exposure to physical, sexual and psychological violence, while limiting their access to protection and recovery services,” said Kenyatta said at a conference on gender equality. .

“This is now a crisis that we must address urgently. Ending gender-based violence remains at the heart of the development agenda,” he said, speaking via video link.

Kenya to invest $ 23 million by 2022 and an additional $ 50 million by 2026 to help tackle gender-based violence, pledging to establish shelters for victims across the country and strengthen police resources to deal with gender crimes, he said.

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Other commitments include the implementation of policies aimed at curbing sexual harassment in the workplace and the integration of medical, legal and psychosocial support to victims as part of the country’s universal health coverage regime.

Kenyatta’s pledge precedes the UN Women’s Generation Equality Forum in Paris in June, where countries are expected to make bold pledges to achieve gender parity.

Around the world, violence against women has increased during closures linked to the pandemic.

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Social and economic tensions – compounded by strict restrictions on movement – have not only made women and girls more prone to physical and sexual violence, but also more vulnerable to sexual exploitation – especially in developing countries like Kenya.

Women’s rights groups – who have long campaigned for measures such as increased funding and shelters for survivors – welcomed the commitments Kenyatta made, adding that they were ready to work with the government to implement them.

“We are very excited about the commitments made, they are quite bold and reflect all the critical demands of civil society,” said Judy Gitau, regional coordinator of Equality Now.

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Gitau said the funding was a big improvement, as the government’s previous allocation for gender-based violence was “tiny” at around Ksh 200 million ($ 1.86 million).

“But it’s up to us to make sure that these commitments are formulated as they should be… We have to follow up and make sure they are kept.”

($ 1 = 107.5000 Kenyan shillings) (Reporting by Nita Bhalla @nitabhalla; Editing by Helen Popper. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, which covers the lives of people around the world who are struggling to survive freely or fairly. Visit http://news.trust.org)



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C’garh tops gender equality in sustainability index https://cflweb.org/cgarh-tops-gender-equality-in-sustainability-index/ https://cflweb.org/cgarh-tops-gender-equality-in-sustainability-index/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 18:32:50 +0000 https://cflweb.org/cgarh-tops-gender-equality-in-sustainability-index/ Chhattisgarh became the first state to achieve the gender equality sustainable development goal according to Niti Aayog’s 2020-21 Sustainable Development Goals Index report released on Thursday. In addition to being among the top five Sustainable Development Goals, the state is also among the performing states with an overall index of 61, along with Uttar Pradesh, […]]]>


Chhattisgarh became the first state to achieve the gender equality sustainable development goal according to Niti Aayog’s 2020-21 Sustainable Development Goals Index report released on Thursday.

In addition to being among the top five Sustainable Development Goals, the state is also among the performing states with an overall index of 61, along with Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Odisha.

The five main development indicators are freedom from poverty, zero hunger, health, education and gender equality.

The India Index of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) assesses the progress of States and Union territories with a qualitative assessment of 17 goals on social, economic and environmental parameters.

Last year, Chhattisgarh witnessed a high participation of women in MGNREGA, with women getting paid employment of Rs 4.65 crore out of Rs 9.17 crore generated, according to an official communication.

Women in Chhattisgarh made up 50.75% of the workforce in the first four months of the current 2020-21 fiscal year. In addition, 24.28 lakh female workers obtained employment during the various phases of the Covid-induced lockdown.

Self-help groups in Chhattisgarh greatly contribute to the economic empowerment of women. Twenty Lakh women have obtained employment by joining self-help groups.

Women also participate 50 percent in the panchayats of Chhattisgarh.

In Gauthans, women carry out many economic activities in addition to making vermin-compost. They derive their income from the small forest products they collect.

Chhattisgarh has adopted policies to promote gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls. This is why Chhattisgarh is also among the top states in the country in terms of sex ratio, according to the statement.

The Chhattisgarh government is committed to ending all discrimination and violence against women and girls. The use of information and communication technologies is encouraged to empower women. The state guaranteed ownership and control of women in accordance with the land and property law.



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