Gender Equality – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 21:03:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cflweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Gender Equality – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ 32 32 Hold the climate destroyers to account – activists | The new times https://cflweb.org/hold-the-climate-destroyers-to-account-activists-the-new-times/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 21:03:34 +0000 https://cflweb.org/hold-the-climate-destroyers-to-account-activists-the-new-times/ After lengthy discussions on how women too should be involved in environmental protection at the Commonwealth Women’s Forum in Kigali on Tuesday 21 June, the conversation took a turn when delegates pointed out that companies responsible for damage should be held liable. It was during a session under the theme: “Gender and climate change: Interactions […]]]>

After lengthy discussions on how women too should be involved in environmental protection at the Commonwealth Women’s Forum in Kigali on Tuesday 21 June, the conversation took a turn when delegates pointed out that companies responsible for damage should be held liable.

It was during a session under the theme: “Gender and climate change: Interactions and opportunity for progress”.

Olive Uwamariya, a feminist from Rwanda, took the lead and asked why in important discussions large corporations with greater contribution to environmental damage are ignored.

“Today we are talking about 100 multinational companies that are responsible for more than 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Why is the private sector not involved in this conversation when we know it has a big role to play?

“As we talk about personal and collective responsibility, how can we ensure that they are held accountable? asked Uwamariya.

Indeed, only 100 companies have been responsible for more than 70% of global greenhouse gas emissions since 1988, and it would be pointless not to hold them accountable if a green world were achieved, or at least the risk to which climate change affects us reduced.

“We come to meetings like this, recommendations are made and one of the commitments is to hold the culprits accountable. What are we doing as a Commonwealth to make sure the culprits pay the price? asked Brighton Vita, Bishop of the Anglican Church of Malawi.

Other discussions held during the Women’s Forum invest more in the education of the girl, but without forgetting the boy.

Over 500 delegates are in Kigali at the Commonwealth Women’s Forum to discuss solutions to address pressing challenges affecting women and girls across the Commonwealth, and to ensure member countries have strong policies and programs in place to achieve gender equality goals by 2030.

The Forum, which is taking place in Africa for the first time ever, is themed: Delivering a Common Future: Transforming Gender Equality.

Apart from the Women’s Forum, several other clusters have been lined up including the Heads of Government Meeting (the main event), the Youth Forum which started on Sunday 19th June, the People’s Forum and the Business Forum which start both today.

giribagiza@newtimesrwanda.com

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Meet the team behind the Bangkok Pride Parade Global Voices https://cflweb.org/meet-the-team-behind-the-bangkok-pride-parade-global-voices/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 06:34:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/meet-the-team-behind-the-bangkok-pride-parade-global-voices/ Naruemit Pride Parade organizers pose for photos in Bangkok on June 6. Photo by Prachatai This article by Teeranai Charuvastra was originally published by Prachatai, an independent news site in Thailand, and an edited version is republished by Global Voices under a content-sharing agreement. After a nearly two-decade hiatus, the Pride Parade returned to Bangkok, […]]]>

Naruemit Pride Parade organizers pose for photos in Bangkok on June 6. Photo by Prachatai

This article by Teeranai Charuvastra was originally published by Prachatai, an independent news site in Thailand, and an edited version is republished by Global Voices under a content-sharing agreement.

After a nearly two-decade hiatus, the Pride Parade returned to Bangkok, Thailand on June 5 with a bang, drawing crowds of members of the LGBTQ+ community, sex workers, feminists, political dissidents and even corporate advocates.

The event was such a success that even its organizers were taken by surprise, they told Prachatai English in an interview. Emboldened by the overwhelming reception, they now aim to expand the fight for gender equality beyond Bangkok by organizing similar Pride campaigns across the country.

In an interview with Prachatai English, the team behind the Pride Parade shared their assessment of the event; how they managed to win such support in a largely conservative Thailand; and how the recent election of Chadchart Sittipunt as Bangkok’s new governor swung public support decisively in their favour.

The “Naruemit” Pride Parade, which means “creation” in Thai, included speeches, drag shows and dance parties throughout the day. No official attendance data was released, but one of the organizers said the event drew around 10,000 attendees.

Longtime gender equality advocate Chumaporn “Waaddao” Taengkliang said:

I felt really proud. It is an enriching experience to know that what we have done has brought our city and its inhabitants back to life. And I was really touched, because I could feel that people were having fun and hoping, proud of the diversity of gender identities.

The parade attracted a wide range of participants, from members of the LGBTQ+ community and their supporters, to women‘s rights activists, foreign tourists, sex workers, same-sex marriage advocates and government critics who used the march to express their political agendas.

There were even politicians, and the most prominent was the newly elected governor of Bankok, Chadchart Sittipunt, who pledged his support for the Pride Parade from the night of his election victory on May 31.

Members of the LGBTQ community and their supporters take part in the Pride march in Bangkok. Photo by Prachatai

The rare, the proud

The diversity celebrated by the June 5 parade was also evident among the organizers.

The planning committee was made up of Bangkokians, from the northeast and the south. One identifies as trans-non-binary, another as intersex, while another uses “ze” as a preferred pronoun. Most have been involved in campaigning for gender equality and LGBTQ+ rights for years, but for some it was their first time hosting an event.

Methawee Pannon, a 4th year student from Khon Kaen University, shared his thoughts:

Before that, I was just an outsider. I just signed my name on petitions and retweeted other people’s posts. But now I have seen and learned so much about the details of preparation. It gave me a very good first impression. It’s so different from what I’ve experienced on the outside.

The same opinions were expressed by many organizers: they were pleasantly surprised by the turnout for the parade and the warm reception from the public and the media.

“It was really beyond my expectations. When we started planning, we didn’t know so many people would come marching with us,” said Jingjai Jingjit, a 34-year-old member of Feminist Mermaids, a women’s rights group based in the province. from Songkhla.

Processions and rallies in support of LGBTQ+ rights have taken place in Thailand before, the last one taking place in Bangkok in 2006. But they were either gay parades or events marking the International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and transphobia, not like Pride activity tied to June’s Global Pride Month, said Waaddao, an activist who also leads a group called Togetherness for Equality and Action (TEA).

In that sense, she said, the June 5 parade was the first of its kind for the capital. She added that a Pride Parade is not just about gender equality.

This is democracy: we had to take to the streets and demand that our rights be respected. We wanted to practice street democracy.

The first parade planning meeting had “less than 10 people and 0 baht [Thai currency]“recalls Waaddao. Later, the news spread to other groups in the close-knit circle of LGBTQ+ activists and feminists. A total of 400,000 THB (11,350 USD) was raised to fund the parade. Funding came from equality organizations, donations from the public, and proceeds from afterparty ticket sales.

The organizers adopted what they called a “power-sharing” management as opposed to a hierarchical style of management. There was no leader or official spokesperson. During interviews, team members repeatedly emphasized that the parade was a collective effort. For this reason, they also tried to avoid media interviews involving individual representatives of the group.

The Chadchart effect

Team members also attributed the high turnout and public acceptance to the public endorsement given by Governor Chadchart, who attended several events prior to the June 5 parade. Waaddao said:

Chadchart’s support was a critical factor. The Chadchart effect is still strong. It helped mobilize people. Even though Chadchart didn’t organize the parade, he helped make our activity look like it was supported by the city.

With the head of Bangkok’s government hierarchy fully behind the march, support from the authorities quickly followed. On June 5, police cordoned off the march route and directed traffic flows through the heart of Silom district. State officials and medical personnel have also been deployed to provide support.

The result was a rarity in Thailand, where protests are regularly obstructed or violently dispersed.

Even more surprising to Naruemit organizers was the show of solidarity from the private sector, including some of Thailand’s biggest corporations, which are typically reluctant to advocate for civil interests and movements.

A sign calling for the resignation of Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha hangs above the Pride parade in Bangkok. Photo by Prachatai

Organizers say the near-universal support for the march has nonetheless been marred by government hostility. The Ministry of Health has tried to stoke public fears that the monkeypox disease could be spreading in Thailand due to foreign tourists attending the Pride Parade.

The World Health Organization said those fears were unfounded, but that didn’t stop government spokesmen from repeating the warning to the media.

“I wasn’t surprised they were trying to paint us that way. But I was very angry to see it,” said Jingjai, the Feminist Mermaids activist.

Pride beyond Bangkok

Naruemit’s success was enough to encourage organizers to focus on other Pride events outside of Bangkok. They are already planning to hold a march in Hat Yai district of Songkhla province on June 26 and another in Khon Kaen province on June 30.

But expanding the struggle beyond Bangkok comes with its own challenges, including potential resistance from people in more conservative parts of the country. Just 10 years ago, a gay parade in Chiang Mai was forced to cancel after protests from local residents.

Others said they were convinced times had changed and Thailand was now more ready than ever to embrace diversity.

“Of course, I think of the risk. I guess it’s normal that our event is attacked by some people,” Jingjai said. “But we will welcome the parade in a friendly way. I don’t think there will be a big backlash.

She added, “I think Thai people are more and more aware of their rights now.”

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Women are experiencing a “phantom pandemic”. Covid-19 made it worse https://cflweb.org/women-are-experiencing-a-phantom-pandemic-covid-19-made-it-worse/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 06:33:02 +0000 https://cflweb.org/women-are-experiencing-a-phantom-pandemic-covid-19-made-it-worse/ Violence against women and girls has reached devastating proportions around the world. A United Nations report recently revealed that one in three women, or approximately 736 million worldwide, have experienced physical and psychological violence. From domestic violence to sexual harassment, these various forms of abuse are deeply harmful to women. And unfortunately, this situation has […]]]>

Violence against women and girls has reached devastating proportions around the world. A United Nations report recently revealed that one in three women, or approximately 736 million worldwide, have experienced physical and psychological violence. From domestic violence to sexual harassment, these various forms of abuse are deeply harmful to women. And unfortunately, this situation has further deteriorated since the beginning of COVID-19.

An in-depth analysis of the data reveals that violence against women begins at an early age: almost a quarter of all girls have experienced gender-based violence before the age of 19, if they have been in couple. Physical and sexual assaults now threaten the well-being of women to such a degree that one could speak of a pandemic.

One of the defining moral challenges of our time will be to eradicate violence against women. And it is doable.

Survivor-centered solutions are essential

Civil society organizations can play a major role in connecting legal and personal safety specialists with women in at-risk communities. These communities include rural areas where poverty persists, where victims of gender-based violence often have no one to turn to. As a result, sexual violence often goes unchecked. We must prioritize improving access to legal services for women as both a preventive and accountability measure. Civil society groups with the necessary resources should be encouraged to engage with women survivors and their communities to reverse past neglect.

There are also areas where traditional justice systems can victimize survivors. Here we need specialists on the ground to help women and girls. In regions with traditional justice systems, such as East Africa, the public leadership structure begins with village elders. Service and advocacy organizations should facilitate dialogues with respected elders about persistent stigma and stereotypes.

Survivors of sexual assault need to be humanized by illustrating to elders the first-hand traumatic experiences of these survivors. Civil society can also provide mental health support to female survivors. Together, we must lead by example that care is the right answer to survivors, as opposed to marginalization.

International organizations should work with local government authorities to empower women to consider sharing their stories. Providing protection to survivors is essential and the international community should provide adequate material resources to low-income areas to build shelters for victims of sexual abuse. Promoting access to female healthcare is also essential to the process of empowering women.


Read also : India concerned about discriminatory and inferior status given to women in Afghan society


Train the next generation

Teaching the next generation to stand up for women and girls must be a priority. WHO-sponsored research shows that effective early education can help prevent intimate partner violence. International institutions should provide guidance on gender equality education reform and national women’s rights organizations can then localize the message. Men and boys need to learn from an early age to choose respectful words and actions when talking to women. In other words, men and boys should be actively involved in the prevention effort.

In addition to implementing fair and equitable education strategies, it is crucial to ensure the safety of women and girls who come to school. In particularly high-risk communities, school buses should have ticket inspectors to verify identities. A case study from Tanzania showed that education is a key pathway to ending poverty. Ensuring women’s right to quality education helps break the cycle of poverty and enables women to understand their human rights.

Moral action is also smart economics

To mobilize decisive action, it is imperative to remind hesitant people of the serious economic costs of gender inequality. When human beings experience physical and sexual violence, their general health deteriorates and they begin to miss work. Every day, abused women who miss work lead to losses in productivity and overall economic output in a country. It is therefore in the interest of any government to intensify and combat violence against women.

Gender-based violence can harm anyone, but certain groups are particularly vulnerable. For example, it disproportionately affects women and girls living in less developed regions. UN Women pointed out that women in countries classified as “least developed countries” have been subjected to a significantly higher rate of domestic violence over the past year, 13% more. This means that a greater proportion of women in low-income areas experience abuse that can prevent them from contributing to local economic development, perpetuating a cycle of violence and poverty. The fight against gender-based violence will be most important in the poorest regions of the world. A global effort to eradicate violence against women is an opportunity for poor countries to accelerate economic growth and reduce poverty.

Women’s rights are human rights and human rights are women’s rights

Women’s rights are human rights, and human rights are women’s rights. When this principle was declared at the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing in 1995, people dared to imagine a more inclusive and compassionate 21st century. Today, with the resurgence of violence against women, we urgently need to take concrete action to advance women’s rights.

Bincheng Mao is Chairman of the Board of the East Coast Coalition for Tolerance and Non-Discrimination (ECC).

The article was previously published in the World Economic Forum.


Read also : Brutal beating of women in China sparks outrage on social media


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UGC calls on colleges and universities to form gender bias complaints committee https://cflweb.org/ugc-calls-on-colleges-and-universities-to-form-gender-bias-complaints-committee/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 14:43:46 +0000 https://cflweb.org/ugc-calls-on-colleges-and-universities-to-form-gender-bias-complaints-committee/ The University Grants Commission, UGC, has ordered universities and colleges to set up an internal complaints committee, ICC, to address gender bias. The UGC has also requested the formation of a special unit that conducts gender awareness programs. In a statement released by the UGC on its official website, it is mentioned: “You are requested […]]]>
The University Grants Commission, UGC, has ordered universities and colleges to set up an internal complaints committee, ICC, to address gender bias. The UGC has also requested the formation of a special unit that conducts gender awareness programs.

In a statement released by the UGC on its official website, it is mentioned: “You are requested to ensure that the ICC constituted by your esteemed university works in accordance with the UGC (Prevention, Prohibition and Redress of Sexual Harassment of Female Employees and Female Students in Higher Education Institutions) Regulations, 2015.”

In addition, UGC has requested all affiliated universities and colleges to complete the gender audit compliance online on the SAKSHAM portal.

ICC will ensure that no gender bias is found in the atmosphere of colleges and universities. Any complaints about this should be handled with sensitivity and impact.

The UGC had also asked universities to set up hotlines for women, police and hospital helplines in all institutions. In addition, colleges are required to organize exposure visits to villages, blocks, districts and towns to impart knowledge on gender equality.

UGC has called on all educational institutions to ensure gender equality on their premises and that every person is treated with dignity and respect. The UGC said, “The Government of India, in order to increase the scope of creating an environment that promotes equal treatment, is considering gender equality champions in all educational institutions across the country. . Gender champions can be both boys and girls over the age of 16 enrolled in educational institutions. Gender Champions are seen as responsible leaders who will facilitate an enabling environment within their schools/colleges/academic institutions where girls are treated with dignity and respect.
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Report Shows Government Failing to Deliver Funds Pledged to Save Indigenous Lives « Canada’s NDP https://cflweb.org/report-shows-government-failing-to-deliver-funds-pledged-to-save-indigenous-lives-canadas-ndp/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 15:14:46 +0000 https://cflweb.org/report-shows-government-failing-to-deliver-funds-pledged-to-save-indigenous-lives-canadas-ndp/ NDP MP reiterates call for a safe space for women, girls and gender-diverse people fleeing violence OTTAWA – Today, NDP Women and Gender Equality Critic Leah Gazan was joined by community leaders who called on the Liberals to immediately fund a 24/7 safe space. days a week, for women, girls and gender diverse people in […]]]>

NDP MP reiterates call for a safe space for women, girls and gender-diverse people fleeing violence

OTTAWA – Today, NDP Women and Gender Equality Critic Leah Gazan was joined by community leaders who called on the Liberals to immediately fund a 24/7 safe space. days a week, for women, girls and gender diverse people in Winnipeg. Gazan’s call for more support comes after five Indigenous women have been killed or lost their lives due to failing systems in the past few weeks in Winnipeg alone. She also demanded answers from the Liberal government over the troubling confirmation that Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation and Indigenous Services Canada spent none of the $724.1 million Violence Prevention Strategy first announced in fall 2020 to provide shelter and operational funding across the country.

“Indigenous women, girls and gender diverse people in Winnipeg are in fear for their lives and they don’t have access to a culturally sensitive, 24-hour, low-barrier safe space, Gazan said. “For more than 10 years, our community has been calling for this space to save lives. And since coming to power, the Liberals have been stalling. To hear that three years after the release of the final report of the MMIWG National Inquiry, the Liberals have not funded a single new shelter in Winnipeg or across the country – it is simply devastating. Not a single shelter. It is costing aboriginal people their lives.

The NDP calls for shelter for those fleeing violence in a culturally appropriate setting, with staff trained to support those who have experienced gender-based violence. While creating low-barrier shelters and safe spaces for Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA people is a direct call for justice from the Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG), the Liberals failed to deliver.

“How many more people have to die before this government listens? How many other families have to mourn a loved one because of their inability to fund living spaces? said Gazan. “We cannot afford to be patient when an average of one Indigenous woman per week died in our city last month and Indigenous women are 4.5 times more likely to be murdered than non-Indigenous women . The Liberals love to make funding announcements, but that is not enough if the money never gets to the communities that desperately need it. These are preventable deaths and New Democrats will not stop fighting until this government creates a safe, low-barrier space for Indigenous women in Winnipeg.

Quotes from community leaders:
“In Ka Ni Kanichihk, we see women at risk every day, and those who recover go through incredible trauma. We have worked with women like this every day for 20 years, and the heartbroken families of murdered and missing women. This must stop. Now. It’s time to protect precious lives – our mothers, our sisters, our daughters. We are all parents and we are asking for help from the government.
– Dodie Jordaan, Executive Director of Ka Ni Kanichihk Inc
“We need to take a decolonized approach when considering how to ensure that Indigenous women, girls, and 2SLGBTQQIA+ people are safe from harm. All governments, institutions, organizations and individuals must exercise the political will to respond to the 231 calls for justice to end this genocide. .”
– Hilda Anderson-Pyrz, President of the National Family and Survivors Circle

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International Opti Regatta in St. Thomas >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News https://cflweb.org/international-opti-regatta-in-st-thomas-scuttlebutt-sailing-news/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 23:22:56 +0000 https://cflweb.org/international-opti-regatta-in-st-thomas-scuttlebutt-sailing-news/ St. Thomas, USVI (June 12, 2022) – The Caribbean’s largest annual small boat regatta kicks off this week. The TOTE Clinic runs June 13-15, the TOTE Team Race runs June 16, and the International Optimists Regatta (IOR) runs Friday-Sunday, June 17-19. A fleet of over one hundred sailors ages 8 to 15 from Puerto Rico, […]]]>

St. Thomas, USVI (June 12, 2022) – The Caribbean’s largest annual small boat regatta kicks off this week. The TOTE Clinic runs June 13-15, the TOTE Team Race runs June 16, and the International Optimists Regatta (IOR) runs Friday-Sunday, June 17-19.

A fleet of over one hundred sailors ages 8 to 15 from Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands and several US states will compete in an 8-foot-long single-sail Optimist in this trio of events. What makes this upcoming week unique is the combination of instruction, team and fleet racing, which includes beginner and advanced sailors, all in one event.

“We are thrilled to welcome our local, regional and international sailors, along with their family, friends and coaches to share in the ideal sailing conditions and warm hospitality here in the U.S. Virgin Islands,” said Emily Zimmerman, Director regatta and commodore. from the host, St. Thomas Yacht Club (STYC).

“This event is not only an opportunity for our young competitors to challenge their sailing skills, but also to reconnect and make new friendships. Additionally, we are proud that in the nearly three decades this event has taken place, several past winners and participants have excelled in the sport.

“Specifically, our IOR alumni have gone on to become high school national champions, college and world sailing All-Americans, #1 ranked match racers, world one-design class champions, Olympians and members of the America’s Cup campaign squad.”

Eleven international coaches, most of whom are national team coaches and all considered among the best Optimist coaches in the United States and around the world, make the TOTE clinic as informative as it is inspiring for registered junior sailors.

The coaches, in alphabetical order with their affiliations, are Mykel Alonso (Coral Reef Yacht Club, FL, USA), Pepe Betini (Long Island Sound Optimist Team, NY, USA), Jose Arturo Diaz (Club Nautico de San Juan, PR) , Mateo Di Blasi (STYC, USVI), Edgar Diminich (Key Biscayne Yacht Club, FL, USA), Bernat Gali (Coral Reef Yacht Club, FL, USA), Kate McDonald (STYC, USVI), Gonzalo Pollitzer (Club Nautico San Isidro, Argentina), Agustin Resano (STYC, USVI), Manny Resano (California Yacht Club, CA, USA) and Esteban Rocha (Fort Lauderdale Yacht Club, FL, USA).

Two new annual awards will be introduced this year, one for competitors and one for coaches. The Founders Trophy will be awarded to the best sailor in the IOR. It is designed to promote the participation of more young women in this event as well as to honor the best female sailors in the IOR through a name plate on the perpetual trophy.

The Founders Trophy is the brainchild of two of the event’s five founders, Henry and Fredelle Menin, who launched the IOR in 1993 with co-founders Verian Tuttle, Karen Paige and the late Bruce Marshall. The new IOR Founders’ Trophy is part of efforts by World Sailing, the sport’s global governing body, to promote gender equality in all aspects of sailing.

New this year is the first annual Coaches Cup Challenge Opti Race on Wednesday, June 15 from 5 p.m. The winning Coach gets 100 percent of the bragging rights and 50 percent of the proceeds going to their local Club’s Optimist program. The other half of proceeds will support the St. Thomas Yacht Club Optimist Program. The challenge is sponsored by the non-profit St. Thomas Yacht Club foundation.

In other prizes, trophies will be awarded to the top five sailors in each fleet: red (13-15), blue (11-12), white (10 and under), green (beginners) and the top three sailors. globally by score. A perpetual trophy, introduced in 2017, is inscribed with the names of winners from the past 28 years. Additional trophies include the Peter Ives Perpetual Trophy and the Chuck Fuller Sportsmanship Award. The Sea Star Perpetual Trophy will be entered with the names of the sailors from the winning racing team.

The IOR is sanctioned by the Caribbean Sailing Association.

This year’s event will follow an ecological theme. Sailors will be encouraged to recycle all plastic water bottles, use the reusable water bottle in the goodie bag throughout the regatta, keep all lunch bags and wrappers out of the water, to pick up litter on land and to accept drinks without a straw.

Event details: stthomasyachtclub.org/sailing/regattas/international-optimist-regatta

Source: event media

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Van Hollen and Cardin join colleagues in presenting a resolution recognizing June as LGBTQ Pride Month https://cflweb.org/van-hollen-and-cardin-join-colleagues-in-presenting-a-resolution-recognizing-june-as-lgbtq-pride-month/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 21:15:41 +0000 https://cflweb.org/van-hollen-and-cardin-join-colleagues-in-presenting-a-resolution-recognizing-june-as-lgbtq-pride-month/ June 10, 2022 U.S. Senators Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), Ben Cardin (D-Md.), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), and Tina Smith (D-Minn.) presented a Senate resolution recognizing June as LGBTQ Pride Month. The senators’ resolution highlights the contributions LGBTQ people have made to American society, notes several milestones in the fight for equal treatment for […]]]>

June 10, 2022

U.S. Senators Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), Ben Cardin (D-Md.), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), and Tina Smith (D-Minn.) presented a Senate resolution recognizing June as LGBTQ Pride Month. The senators’ resolution highlights the contributions LGBTQ people have made to American society, notes several milestones in the fight for equal treatment for LGBTQ Americans, and resolves to continue efforts to achieve full equality for LGBTQ people. The resolution also acknowledges how the U.S. Supreme Court’s pending bill to strike down Roe vs. Wade could potentially undermine and erode other constitutional rights also based on privacy, including the right for same-sex couples to marry or engage in consensual relationships without risk of criminal prosecution.

As we mark the start of Pride Month, we celebrate the progress our nation has made, but recognize that the fight is far from over as many LGBTQ+ Americans still do not enjoy equal protections under the law. », said Senator Van Hollen. “I will continue to work to fight for the rights of all members of the LGBTQ+ community and to pass the Equality Act to ensure that no American is discriminated against because of who they are. It will bring us closer to defending the ideals on which our country was founded – freedom and justice for all.

“We dedicate the month of June to celebrating the triumphs of the LGBTQ+ community while recognizing their struggles and the work that remains to be done. In this Pride month, it is essential that we stand together to elevate and support LGBTQ+ voices, especially our children, at a time when local and state legislatures are attacking their rights. No one should be afraid to be true and authentic themselves, said Senator Cardin.

“More than 50 years ago, the Stonewall Uprising, led largely by trans women of color, brought national attention to the ongoing movement for justice that endures today in Ohio and throughout all the countries”, said Senator Brown. “This Pride Month – and throughout the year – we recommit to gender equality and social, economic and racial justice, and to uphold marriage equality as a constitutional right. guaranteed by the Supreme Court seven years ago.”

“Everyone has the right to live their authentic life without discrimination or hatred. I am proud of the tremendous progress made in the fight for justice, equality and inclusion,” said Senator Feinstein. “This Pride Month, as we celebrate this progress, let’s also recognize that we still have work to do and continue to push for true equality.”

“This month, and throughout the year, we celebrate, recognize and uplift the LGBTQ+ community,” said Senator Smith. “The freedom to live and love openly is fundamental. This Pride month, we recognize the courage and achievements of those who have been on the front lines of the LGBTQ movement and recommit ourselves to the fight for justice. and equality. I’m proud to help lead this resolution.”

In 2021, Senate Democrats reintroduced the Equality Act, legislation to ensure that civil rights laws prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. The Equality Act would unequivocally prohibit discrimination in a host of areas, including employment, housing, public accommodations, jury service, access to credit, federal financial aid, and education.

Along with Senators Van Hollen, Cardin, Brown, Feinstein and Smith, the resolution was co-sponsored by Senators Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Ed Markey (D-Mass.), Maggie Hassan (DN.H.), Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), Angus King (I-Maine), Tom Carper (D-Del.), Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) , Sheldon Whitehouse (DR.I.), Bob Casey (D-Pa.), Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), Richard Durbin (D-Ill.), Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.), Kirsten Gillibrand (DN .Y.), Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii), Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.), Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), Tim Kaine (D-Va.), Jacky Rosen (D-Nev.), Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.), Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.), Alex Padilla (D-Calif.), Joe Manchin (DW.Va.), Cory Booker (DN.J.), Patrick Leahy (D- Vt.), Chris Coons (D-Del.), Jack Reed (DR.I.), Reverend Raphael Warnock (D-Ga.), Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), Mark Warner (D-Va.) , Martin Heinrich (DN.M.), John Hickenlooper (D-Colo.), Bob Menendez (DN.J.), Jeanne Shaheen (DN.H.), Mark Kelly (D-Arizona) , Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), Ben Ray Luján (DN.M.), Patty Murray (D-Wash.), Kyrsten Sinema (D-Arizona), Gary Peters (D-Mich.), Michael Bennet (D -Colo .), Jon Tester (D-Mont.), John Ossoff (D-Ga.) and Chuck Schumer (DN.Y.).

The full text of the resolution is available here.

This year’s Pride Resolution has been endorsed by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC).

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Eurostat documents ‘negative developments’ in the EU on SDG 15 | News | SDG Knowledge Center https://cflweb.org/eurostat-documents-negative-developments-in-the-eu-on-sdg-15-news-sdg-knowledge-center/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 23:14:42 +0000 https://cflweb.org/eurostat-documents-negative-developments-in-the-eu-on-sdg-15-news-sdg-knowledge-center/ Eurostat has published a monitoring report on progress towards the SDGs in the EU. The report finds that over the past five years the EU has made progress towards most of the SDGs, and although progress on some goals has been faster than on others, “the shift away from Sustainable development has only occurred in […]]]>

Eurostat has published a monitoring report on progress towards the SDGs in the EU. The report finds that over the past five years the EU has made progress towards most of the SDGs, and although progress on some goals has been faster than on others, “the shift away from Sustainable development has only occurred in a few specific areas, including biodiversity and ecosystem conservation.

Eurostat’s assessment indicates significant progress on five SDGs. The greatest progress, he notes, has been made on SDG 16 (peace, justice and strong institutions). The share of the EU population reporting crime and violence in their communities has increased from 13.2% in 2015 to 10.9% in 2020. In addition, more people consider their country’s justice system to be sufficiently independent, which represents an increase from 50% in 2016 to 54% in 2021.

Managing the impact of the economic shock caused by the Russian invasion of Ukraine must not make us lose sight of our objective of transforming the EU’s economic model.

— Paolo Gentiloni, European Commissioner for the Economy

Although the report documents significant progress towards reducing poverty and social exclusion (SDG 1), it acknowledges that available data “does not yet fully reflect the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic”. It also notes significant progress on: innovation and infrastructure (SDG 9); the economy and labor market (SDG 8), with the employment rate rising to 73.1% in 2021, exceeding pre-pandemic levels; and clean and affordable energy (SDG 7), although a UN press release notes that the report does not reflect recent increases in energy prices and other impacts of the war in Ukraine.

Eurostat highlights “some clearly negative developments”, which translates into a “slightly negative goal-level assessment” on SDG 15 (life on land). According to the report, over the past five years, ecosystems and biodiversity have remained under pressure from human activities. Although there have been slight increases in EU forest area and terrestrial protected areas, “pressures on biodiversity from land use, including soil sealing by impermeable materials” , continued to grow, leading to habitat loss. Like previous assessments, the report confirms that the conservation status of biodiversity and ecosystems in the EU is unfavorable and that EU consumption patterns have significant negative impacts on biodiversity.

Report notes moderate progress in health and well-being (SDG 3), life below water (SDG 14), gender equality (SDG 5), sustainable cities and communities (SDG 11) ), reducing inequalities (SDG 10), responsible consumption and production (SDG 12), quality education (SDG 4), climate action (SDG 13) and zero hunger (SDG 2). It provides a ‘neutral’ assessment of EU progress on SDG 17 (partnerships for the goals) and SDG 6 (drinking water and sanitation), given an ‘almost equal number of sustainable developments and unsustainable.

Released on 23 May 2022, the report is the sixth in a series of annual monitoring assessments launched by the EU Statistical Office in 2017. Based on a set of indicators developed to track progress towards the SDGs in In a European context, it aims to provide a benchmark to assess whether the EU has made progress towards the goals over the past five and 15 year periods. [Publication: Sustainable development in the European Union: 2022 Monitoring Report on Progress Towards the SDGs in an EU context] [Publication Landing Page] [European Commission Press Release] [UN in Western Europe Press Release] [SDG Knowledge Hub Story on the 2020 Report]

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UK four-day working week trial begins with 70 companies https://cflweb.org/uk-four-day-working-week-trial-begins-with-70-companies/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 06:12:46 +0000 https://cflweb.org/uk-four-day-working-week-trial-begins-with-70-companies/ Placeholder while loading article actions Thousands of workers in Britain had another reason to celebrate after returning from a long weekend to mark Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee. They are taking part in the world’s biggest trial of the four-day working week, as the global movement towards fewer working days gains momentum in the wake […]]]>
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Thousands of workers in Britain had another reason to celebrate after returning from a long weekend to mark Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee. They are taking part in the world’s biggest trial of the four-day working week, as the global movement towards fewer working days gains momentum in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

From fish and chips to large corporations, more than 3,300 workers at 70 companies will work 80% of their hours for 100% of their wages, provided they commit to maintaining 100% productivity.

Iceland has tested a 4-day working week. Employees were productive — and happier, according to the researchers.

The six-month trial, coordinated by non-profit groups 4 Day Week Global and 4 Day Week UK Campaign, with researchers from Cambridge and Oxford universities and Boston College, and labor think tank Autonomy, comes as workplaces grapple with pandemic burnout and the phenomenon dubbed the “Great Resignation”.

“As we emerge from the pandemic, more and more companies are recognizing that the new frontier of competition is quality of life, and that shorter, results-oriented work is the way to give them an edge. competitive,” said Joe O’Connor. , chief executive of 4 Day Week Global, said in a statement. “The impact of the ‘Great Quit’ now proves that workers across a wide range of industries can produce better results while working shorter and smarter.”

Similar trials are expected to begin this year in Scotland, Spain, Australia, New Zealand, the United States and Canada. Belgium announced plans in February to offer employees the option of requesting a four-day working week, as the government seeks to boost flexibility in the workplace amid the coronavirus crisis.

Belgium will offer employees a four-day working week

Caleb Hulme-Moir, who owns New Zealand-based PR firm Mana Communications, instituted a schedule of nine working days every two weeks in early 2020, initially as a way to retain workers as his company slowed during pandemic shutdowns.

At first, they all took a 20% pay cut. However, business rebounded quickly, and within a month they were back on full pay. The short week was so popular, however, that they kept it. His staff in Sydney and New Zealand’s capital, Wellington, alternate between four- and five-day weeks – a move he sees as a stepping stone for a small business that doesn’t yet have enough workers to move to a four-day week and always be available to customers every day of the week.

“I’ve always toyed with the idea of ​​a short work week. It’s good for staff retention in a hot employee market, he said. “People love it.”

Several large-scale trials of a four-day work week in Iceland between 2015 and 2019 found that workers were productive and happier, with fewer instances of stress and burnout.

In the United States, Rep. Mark Takano (D-California) has proposed a bill that would cut all standard workweeks to 32 hours, requiring overtime pay for anyone working beyond that. A number of companies in the United States have tested the four-day work week model.

Four-day weeks and the freedom to roam anywhere: companies are (again) rewriting the future of work

The 40-hour workweek became standard in the United States after the Great Depression; the government saw it as a way to deal with an unemployment crisis by distributing work among more people. During the Industrial Revolution, it was not uncommon for employees to work six days, for 70 hours or more.

Automaker Henry Ford was among the first to switch to a five-day work week in 1926. Ford argued that its employees were more productive on fewer hours. In 1933, the Senate passed, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt supported, a bill to reduce the standard workweek to just 30 hours. He later changed his mind, amid a corporate outcry. The 40-hour week was legislated by Congress in 1940.

A story of the invention of the 40-hour work week, the current burnout crisis, and the alternatives employers use today to attract their workforce. (Video: Jackie Lay/The Washington Post)

Back then, America had almost a 30-hour work week.

In the latest trial, involving 70 companies, researchers will measure the impact on the company’s productivity and the well-being of its workers, as well as the impact on the environment and gender equality.

“We will analyze how employees react to an extra day off, in terms of stress and burnout, job and life satisfaction, health, sleep, energy consumption, travel and many more. aspects of life,” said Juliet Schor, professor. of Sociology at Boston College and principal investigator of the trial.

The first day of the trial, Monday, was not entirely auspicious: it coincided with a strike by thousands of London transport workers that brought the British capital to a standstill, perhaps highlighting the pitfalls of travel.

Gillian Brockell contributed to this report.

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It’s time to end gender conflict https://cflweb.org/its-time-to-end-gender-conflict/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 11:27:42 +0000 https://cflweb.org/its-time-to-end-gender-conflict/ The June 1 local elections showed a greater bias between male and female voters in their thirties and younger than the March presidential election. According to joint exit polls from three terrestrial broadcasters, 65.1% of male voters aged 20 and under voted for the conservative People Power Party (PPP) candidates, while 66.8% of female voters […]]]>

The June 1 local elections showed a greater bias between male and female voters in their thirties and younger than the March presidential election. According to joint exit polls from three terrestrial broadcasters, 65.1% of male voters aged 20 and under voted for the conservative People Power Party (PPP) candidates, while 66.8% of female voters in the same age group voted for the Liberal Democratic Party candidates. Party (DP). The same bias was found among men and women in their thirties. The gap was not so evident among older voters.

Yet politicians continued to ride on gender bias. PPP leader Lee Jun-seok acted as if he was representing the young men. During the campaign, President Yoon Suk-yeol promised to shut down the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family Affairs and allow the introduction of slander into sex crimes cases. Former DP presidential candidate Lee Jae-myung has called himself the “father of assertive women”. The simmering gender conflict in the Moon Jae-in administration that defends women’s rights has only worsened.

To ease the conflict, the older generation needs to be more aware of the thoughts of the young. According to a survey last year, only around 20% of men in their 20s and 30s thought the responsibility for childcare fell primarily to mothers. About the same proportion of women in the same age group felt that men should be breadwinners. This means that young people are more accustomed to equal gender rights than their older counterparts.

What they cannot accept is discrimination. Over 80% of women in their 20s and 30s felt discrimination against their gender was serious. But only about 40% of men in the same age group agreed with them. Women still found a glass ceiling in society while men instead felt discriminated against in college and admission to employment due to affirmative action.

Young women fear gender-related crimes, while young men resent being denied the presumption of innocence in sex crimes. Young men or women are not particularly biased towards certain ideologies, but simply favor political parties that sympathize more with them.

If this conflict is not resolved, Korea will not be able to resolve the aversion to marriage or the low birth rate of the younger generation. Young people in their 20s and 30s approve of preferential scores for military service and the rehiring of women after the birth or custody of a child, regardless of gender, according to a survey. Politicians must develop measures for real gender equality. The Yoon Suk-yeol administration hastily included women in the Cabinet after being criticized for its male-focused appointments by the foreign press. Politicians must stop capitalizing on the suffering of young people.

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