Equal Pay – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 14:19:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://cflweb.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default-150x150.png Equal Pay – CFL Web http://cflweb.org/ 32 32 COMMENT: Don’t recreate the wheel — no reason why pay equity legislation hasn’t moved forward in NL. https://cflweb.org/comment-dont-recreate-the-wheel-no-reason-why-pay-equity-legislation-hasnt-moved-forward-in-nl/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 14:19:03 +0000 https://cflweb.org/comment-dont-recreate-the-wheel-no-reason-why-pay-equity-legislation-hasnt-moved-forward-in-nl/ I don’t know much about it, but if there’s one truth I’ve gleaned from my nine years of post-secondary education (engineering, public policy, and law if we care): if anyone does something sound complicated, it’s either they don’t understand much themselves, or they’re tricked into losing interest in you. So, reading the comments about the […]]]>

I don’t know much about it, but if there’s one truth I’ve gleaned from my nine years of post-secondary education (engineering, public policy, and law if we care): if anyone does something sound complicated, it’s either they don’t understand much themselves, or they’re tricked into losing interest in you.

So, reading the comments about the long-awaited gender pay equity legislation for the province, I became endlessly curious to know what first it was: a general lack of basic understanding on the part of those politicians, or a goal to ward off the public interest?

Prince Edward Island recently announced that its pay transparency legislation will come into effect on June 1. While it’s not technically its pay equity legislation (as it came into effect, like many other provinces, like, oh, you know, 1988), it does a lot with what seems to be a bit and adds to the existing frame.

The legislation essentially mirrors that of other provinces: requiring companies to post salaries when they publicly advertise jobs and prohibiting companies from asking potential job seekers for information about past salaries or salary expectations. It also prohibits employers from going after employees who ask for pay raises or engage in salary discussions. That’s it. It’s like a few extra lines of text in, what, the whole province’s Employment Standards Act.

What it does, however, is really interesting – it forces employers to publish wage information and reduces the ability of companies to exploit workers who can take less (statistically, women and other minority workers) for similar work that would normally pay more.

Like almost all policies intended to benefit equity groups, pay equity/pay transparency legislation actually benefits everyone (at least all workers), as most studies show that the secrecy salary is how you lose by getting the most out of your position. If companies are required to publish job salaries on postings, everyone is able to maintain a good understanding of their specific value to a company and have the data to demand more without penalty.

You might be thinking, “Damn, if we want to see how this turns out, we’ll have to wait a bit and see if it works.” Except we don’t need it — because we’re the fourth (potentially the third, at the rate BC is going) last province to pass such legislation. New PEI Policies are virtually the same as existing Ontario legislation.

For those of you who really care, I’m sure the thought of reading legislation is sleep-inducing (which is a healthy response). However, as someone who has read more statutes and statutes than the average person, I can promise you that it is largely the same. And why wouldn’t it be? An effective policy is often a proven policy. Transferable legislation facilitates interprovincial business.

MHAs talk about this ‘legislation’ like we’re playing a complex ops game and if we use the wrong word in line 2 under (b) the buzzer goes off and our chance for gender equity is over . But these are bananas and a complete misunderstanding of their work or an attempt to distract us from the bewildering simplicity of these policies, especially with the legislation in place and well understood in almost every other province.


Pam Parsons, Minister Responsible for Women and <a class=Gender Equality. – Photo File” data-enhance=”true” src=”https://www.saltwire.com/image/media/photologue/photos/2022/2/8/in-brief-president-ceo-of-nl-advisory-council-on-the-status-o_72exLER.jpg?cs=srgb&fit=clip&h=700&w=847&auto=format%2Ccompress%2Cenhance” srcset=”https://www.saltwire.com/image/media/photologue/photos/2022/2/8/in-brief-president-ceo-of-nl-advisory-council-on-the-status-o_72exLER.jpg?fit=clip&h=700&w=847&auto=compress,https://www.saltwire.com/https://www.saltwire.com/format,https://www.saltwire.com/enhance 847w, https://www.saltwire.com/image/media/photologue/photos/2022/2/8/in-brief-president-ceo-of-nl-advisory-council-on-the-status-o_72exLER.jpg?fit=clip&h=1400&w=1694&auto=compress,https://www.saltwire.com/https://www.saltwire.com/format,https://www.saltwire.com/enhance 1694w”/>
Pam Parsons, Minister Responsible for Women and Gender Equality. – Photo File

Adjustments can be made

It’s far from me to say that the legislation that currently exists is perfect — but you can’t adjust what doesn’t exist. You’re doing everyone a favor by having no protection while we collectively work on optimizations.

Each law goes through several changes once in place – some several times a year – over decades of changes. Such is the cycle of life (and, of course, of politics).

To suggest that MPs in this province cannot even agree to add words encoding the right of workers to know how much money they could make on a job or protecting them with a process if they are taken advantage of is extremely concerning. (Almost as worrisome as the utterly serious comment from elected officials that “there are still wage gaps in provinces that have pay equity legislation”, somehow leaving aside , the fact that most provinces without pay equity legislation have the highest wage gap.

I think my naïveté shines through in my ability to remain impressed by those who constantly weave a fable about hoverboard manufacturing for somehow pulling back the curtain on (ta-da!) a reinvented wheel.

Still.


To suggest that MPs in this province cannot even agree to add words encoding the right of workers to know how much money they could make on a job or protecting them with a process if they are taken advantage of is extremely concerning.


I know that at a critical, even academic level, public policies must be adapted to the environment to which they apply. True evidence-based public policy takes fundamental principles proven in other jurisdictions and engages with local stakeholders, manages variables and modifies what is necessary to ensure that positive results are demonstrated when applied in the intended environment.

However, we’re not talking about something that falls within the jurisdiction — we just require people to be paid the same for the same work. We ask that this be put in writing so that those who find themselves in situations where this is not the case have the power to protect themselves, their colleagues, their families from this inequity. That there are mechanisms to make this fight possible.

The only way to accept that this is a “skills” issue is to suggest that women or other equity groups in Newfoundland and Labrador matter less than those in PEI. .-P.-E. or Ontario or, comparatively, if NL companies matter more than its people. It’s certainly not a complex issue — I don’t even know how the government has managed to call it divisive.


SaltWire network composite
SaltWire network composite

NL’s legacy

I will leave us with this reflection: from 1991, the government of T.-N.-L. fought tooth and nail against his people, taking a case all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada, to avoid paying his people (a subdivision of unionized women) equal pay, in violation of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms .

They asked the Supreme Court to declare that these women deserved to be paid unfairly by others in their fields. The NL government’s argument was that he just couldn’t afford them; the province would go bankrupt. The government has asked that these women in our province be denied a right under the Constitution.

The Supreme Court authorized it (years later the back pay was issued).

That was over 30 years ago. We have seen economic recessions since then, of course, but we have also had economic booms. We have not ceased to reward these women by ensuring that none quietly suffer the same fate as those who suffered it so publicly.

We have not stopped and checked in to provide continued protection for our neighbors during these times of well-being. Is this the story we want to leave of our province?

This question of “do we deserve basic pay equity and pay transparency legislation” is such a solid question for all of us. The only “them” who lose are the companies that profit from the wage gap and the silence on the public discussion of wages.

It is shameful that there is a narrative encouraged by “others” – those who simply ask for protection from oppression or abuse of power. It’s embarrassing that we’re dragging our feet not to protect each other. But the one thing I can say with confidence is that it’s not complicated: it just interferes, apparently, with other interests.

Which begs the question — whose interests are these elected officials more concerned with than the people of this province?

Lori Wareham is from Mount Pearl, NL. She has a university level background in gender public policy research and is interested in diversity and equity in labor law. She was recently called to the bar of Nova Scotia and is now beginning an article in Ottawa.

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Karl Stefanovic and Lisa Wilkinson arrive at their Gold Coast hotels ahead of the Logie Awards https://cflweb.org/karl-stefanovic-and-lisa-wilkinson-arrive-at-their-gold-coast-hotels-ahead-of-the-logie-awards/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 10:09:34 +0000 https://cflweb.org/karl-stefanovic-and-lisa-wilkinson-arrive-at-their-gold-coast-hotels-ahead-of-the-logie-awards/ TV rivals Karl Stefanovic and Lisa Wilkinson avoid crossing paths as they arrive at their Gold Coast hotels ahead of the Logie Awards By Kristy Johnson for Daily Mail Australia Published: 6:09 a.m. EDT, June 18, 2022 | Updated: 8:25 a.m. EDT, June 18, 2022 Lisa Wilkinson quit the Today show in October 2017 after […]]]>

TV rivals Karl Stefanovic and Lisa Wilkinson avoid crossing paths as they arrive at their Gold Coast hotels ahead of the Logie Awards

Lisa Wilkinson quit the Today show in October 2017 after a dispute over the gender pay gap.

And on Saturday, Lisa, 62, and her former co-host Karl Stefanovic, 47, were spotted arriving at their respective Gold Coast hotels ahead of Sunday night’s Logie Awards.

Lisa, who now works for Channel 10’s The Project, made a statement in a bright yellow trench coat, while Karl looked dapper in a black suit, white shirt and bow tie.

Former Karl's Today co-host Lisa Wilkinson (pictured), 62, was also seen arriving at her Gold Coast hotel on Saturday

TV rivals Karl Stefanovic (left), 47, and Lisa Wilkinson (right), 62, arrived at their respective Gold Coast hotels on Saturday ahead of Sunday night’s Logie Awards.

Donning a face mask, Lisa teamed her vibrant coat with a chic black top and pants and crisp white sneakers.

She accessorized with stylish sunglasses and a beige shoulder bag, and her brunette tresses fell loosely around her shoulders.

Meanwhile, Karl made a very dapper arrival at his hotel in a black suit and bow tie ensemble.

The breakfast TV presenter is in the running to win the Gold Logie alongside other notable names such as Hamish Blake, Sonia Kruger and Melissa Leong.

Lisa, who now works for Channel 10 after a gender <a class=pay gap dispute with Nine, wore a bright yellow trench coat, paired with a chic black top and trousers and white trainers.” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

Lisa, who now works for Channel 10 after a gender pay gap dispute with Nine, wore a bright yellow trench coat, paired with a chic black top and trousers and white trainers.

Meanwhile, Karl, who now hosts the Today show alongside Allison Langdon, made a very dapper arrival at his hotel in a black suit and bow tie ensemble.

Meanwhile, Karl, who now hosts the Today show alongside Allison Langdon, made a very dapper arrival at his hotel in a black suit and bow tie ensemble.

Lisa quit the Today show in October 2017 after a dispute over the gender pay gap.

Nine was “unable to meet his expectations” after demanding a salary equal to Karl’s, according to reports at the time.

In January 2018, Lisa joined Channel 10 in a multi-million dollar deal to host The Sunday Project.

Since joining The Sunday Project, Wilkinson has landed interviews with Kim Kardashian, Kylie Minogue and Bradley Cooper.

Lisa quit the Today show in October 2017 after a dispute over the gender pay gap.  Nine was

Lisa quit the Today show in October 2017 after a dispute over the gender pay gap. Nine was “unable to meet his expectations” after demanding a salary equal to Karl’s, according to reports at the time. Photographed together on the show

Although they work for rival networks, Lisa and Karl appeared to be on good terms when they were spotted posing for photos together at an event announcing the Logie 2022 nominees on the Gold Coast last month.

Karl and Lisa looked friendly as they were seen in public together for the first time since she released a tell-all book detailing her time at Channel Nine.

Speaking to The Daily Telegraph at the time, Lisa said: ‘It was lovely to see Karl and a reminder for both of us of the many great years we’ve had together.

Although they work for rival networks, Lisa and Karl appeared to be on good terms when they were spotted posing for photos together at an event announcing the Logie 2022 nominees on the Gold Coast last month ( Photo)

Although they work for rival networks, Lisa and Karl appeared to be on good terms when they were spotted posing for photos together at an event announcing the Logie 2022 nominees on the Gold Coast last month ( Photo)

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Dispute over states’ carbon costs draws skepticism from Eighth Circuit (1) https://cflweb.org/dispute-over-states-carbon-costs-draws-skepticism-from-eighth-circuit-1/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 20:57:39 +0000 https://cflweb.org/dispute-over-states-carbon-costs-draws-skepticism-from-eighth-circuit-1/ A panel of Eighth Circuit judges appeared strongly in favor of upholding a trial court order dismissing a lawsuit brought by Missouri and a dozen other states challenging the use of preliminary estimates on greenhouse gas costs, during oral argument on Thursday. The states want the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit […]]]>

A panel of Eighth Circuit judges appeared strongly in favor of upholding a trial court order dismissing a lawsuit brought by Missouri and a dozen other states challenging the use of preliminary estimates on greenhouse gas costs, during oral argument on Thursday.

The states want the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit to reinvigorate their lawsuit after a judge ruled they lacked standing to sue and their claims were not ripe for court.

Dean John Sauer of the Missouri Attorney General’s Office told the panel that the task force that created the binding estimates has no legislative authority. States were also denied the opportunity to comment on the estimates, Sauer argued.

The Missouri attorney was rebuffed by Judge James B. Loken, who noted that half of his time in the White House was spent on an interagency task force. The judge served there under President Richard Nixon from 1970 to 1972.

Sauer said that none of the executive branch working groups wield the same kind of authority as the group that created the greenhouse gas estimates. But the attorney could not point to an operational action the group took, Loken said.

Sauer was “hypothesizing the impact” of an agency decision based on the estimates, according to Loken.

Minnesota District Judge Kate M. Menendez, sitting by designation, asked the attorney how the estimates were used in the regulatory action. He responded with the federal government issuing emissions standards for light-duty vehicles in December.

Deadline Pressure

The EPA said its analysis of the social costs of greenhouse gases was not material to its final rule, Justice Department attorney Thomas Pulham countered. The Environmental Protection Agency said it would always adopt the final rule regardless of the methods used to quantify the benefits of greenhouse gas reductions, according to Pulham.

The fundamental problem with this challenge is that the preliminary estimates alone “do nothing for the complaining states,” the DOJ attorney said.

Menendez noted that the executive order that created the task force stated that the agencies will “use” the estimates. But agencies sometimes perform cost-benefit analyzes that won’t be relevant to the final decision they make, Pulham said.

Judge Jane Kelly was also on the panel.

Analysts at ClearView Energy Partners LLC said Thursday they expect states to turn to the U.S. Supreme Court if the Eighth Circuit rejects their appeal. But the case may become moot even if the High Court agrees to hear the case, they said, as the task force may have missed its deadline to come up with updated estimates.

“However, we do not rule out that new values ​​may be proposed – if not finalized – at a time when a motion to review an 8th Circuit ruling on interim values ​​is ripe for court consideration, analysts said.

Other states joining the Missouri Challenge include Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Utah.

The case is Missouri v. Biden, 8th Cir., No. 21-03013, pleadings of 06/16/22.

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ACLU of Kansas argues probation shouldn’t depend on ability to pay fines https://cflweb.org/aclu-of-kansas-argues-probation-shouldnt-depend-on-ability-to-pay-fines/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 20:34:32 +0000 https://cflweb.org/aclu-of-kansas-argues-probation-shouldnt-depend-on-ability-to-pay-fines/ TOPEKA — The American Civil Liberties Union of Kansas argues that a state law allowing for the extension of probation for non-payment of fines and fees should be struck down as unconstitutional. A brief the ACLU filed Monday in state appeals court stems from the Johnson County case of Edwanda Garrett, who is appealing the […]]]>

TOPEKA — The American Civil Liberties Union of Kansas argues that a state law allowing for the extension of probation for non-payment of fines and fees should be struck down as unconstitutional.

A brief the ACLU filed Monday in state appeals court stems from the Johnson County case of Edwanda Garrett, who is appealing the continued sentence and probation extensions that resulted from its inability to pay unpaid fines and fees. Under the law in question, the term of probation can be repeatedly extended by the court if one is in arrears with these payments.

Sharon Brett, legal director for the ACLU of Kansas, said the law creates a tiered system of penalties, violating the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause by imposing that standard based on wealth. This clause requires organizations not to discriminate between individuals solely on the basis of differences unrelated to purpose.

“If you’re rich, you can finish your probation and move on,” Brett said. “If you’re not rich, you’re trapped in the system, with all its bad consequences for years and years without a remedy.”

In Bearden v. Georgia, the U.S. Supreme Court said authorities cannot revoke a person’s probation for nonpayment of fines and fees unless they do so voluntarily. The nation’s highest court has already struck down sanctions programs that disproportionately affect those without the financial means.

Brett said the lack of specific language in Kansas law about whether someone willfully fails to pay fines is the basis of the ACLU’s concern. She said a person does not need to have probation revoked to be subject to a continuing sentence.

“Probation comes with a host of onerous conditions that are incredibly difficult to meet,” Brett said.

The current continuing probation process in Kansas is counterproductive because probation requirements often make it harder to earn money, Brett said.

“You have onerous reporting and registration requirements with your probation officer, and you are subject to a range of other conditions, which could include curfews and drug testing, Brett said. “Many employers may not want to hire you as an employee while you are on probation.”

Earlier this year, the ACLU was among groups seeking to end the practice of fines and fees for minors in the justice system.

According to the National Juvenile Defender Center, based on juvenile courts that track income levels, families of young people have annual incomes of less than $20,0000. Fines and fees imposed on children can send them and their parents into a cycle of involvement with the criminal justice system.

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How UK social policies continue to maintain gender inequalities in work and family https://cflweb.org/how-uk-social-policies-continue-to-maintain-gender-inequalities-in-work-and-family/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 07:15:17 +0000 https://cflweb.org/how-uk-social-policies-continue-to-maintain-gender-inequalities-in-work-and-family/ Despite various changes since the establishment of the post-war welfare state, Jenny Chanfreau argues that British social policies have maintained an unequal gender regime. Current policies continue to differentiate between ‘worker’ and ‘parent’, much like William Beveridge’s explicitly gendered male breadwinner/female caregiver model. Formal equality of men and women in the labor market has been […]]]>

Despite various changes since the establishment of the post-war welfare state, Jenny Chanfreau argues that British social policies have maintained an unequal gender regime. Current policies continue to differentiate between ‘worker’ and ‘parent’, much like William Beveridge’s explicitly gendered male breadwinner/female caregiver model.

Formal equality of men and women in the labor market has been a legal requirement for several decades. For example, equal pay for work of equal value has been protected since 1983. Nevertheless, the most recent statistics recorded the median gender pay gap at 15.4%. The latter is often largely explained by the different behavior of men and women after becoming parents. Yet this behavior is heavily shaped by policy, as shared maternity/paternity/parental leave and pay, along with a range of other policies, articulate the opportunities to combine paid work and child-rearing differently for men and women. the women.

Carol Bacchi’s theoretical lens on politics as gender practice draws attention to the role of politics in the complex ongoing social construction and negotiation of gender. The approach asserts that policies help to constitute categories of people, that is, the meanings associated with groupings of people, such as mothers and fathers. This attention to politics as a process of categorization also highlights how political assumptions of “appropriate” behavior for women and men are often implicitly white and middle-class as well as gendered, and thus simultaneously racializing, classifying, heteronormed.

Applying this approach, I have traced the gender of ‘worker’ and ‘parent’ through taxation, in-work and unemployment benefits, leave, childcare, child support and social housing policies over time, and I have concluded that despite a multitude of changes to work and family policies, their gendered effects have remained remarkably constant.

The welfare state established in Britain after the Second World War, with social security rights linked to employees’ contributions, assumed full male employment, a male model of continuous full-time employment throughout life and stable heterosexual marital unions. The Beveridge report emphasized the role of women as wives and mothers with rights derived through the marriage contract. In the early decades, the institutionalization of the male breadwinner model was explicit in many policies, most obviously through joint taxation, but there are many other examples. Did you know, for example, that when a Caregiver Benefit was introduced in the mid-1970s, married women were initially not eligible because such care was presumed to be part of the normal duties of a wife?

Fast forward to the present day and there could be individual income taxation, but the male breadwinner model is perpetuated by means-tested benefits for low-income families. Universal Credit explicitly assigns primary caregiver status to a single parent, whose work requirement is reduced based on the age of the youngest child. Terminology may be gender-neutral, but this reveals an unspoken enduring commitment in benefit policy to (gender) specialization. There is no possibility of a custody-related adjustment to the work requirements of the non-lead parent, either among couples or separated parents (regardless of the number of contacts).

Furthermore, since part-time work rarely offers financial security or salary progression in the short or long term, encouraging part-time work for “primary carers” (usually mothers) can then be considered compatible. with the maintenance of the primacy of their caring role. It exempts the state from either supporting the combination of full-time work and caregiving for all, or from valuing child-rearing through adequate levels of social security and pension protection. This highlights the continued state support for women’s financial dependence on (male) partners. Which, by the way, is also reflected in the low levels of wage replacement for postnatal leave.

Thus, Universal Credit actively impedes the equal sharing of income and parenting responsibilities among low-income parents. The single payment for couples, ostensibly to mimic a salary, further illustrates the underlying assumption of a single earner family/full-time caregiver model. Thus, whatever the gender-neutral terminology, the effect is as gendered as Beveridge’s explicit male breadwinner/female caregiver model. This example also shows that despite the rhetoric of non-interference in private affairs and the right of families to choose how to organize unpaid work, in practice British policy intervenes and regulates family life quite willingly (in especially for low-income people), through his commitment to a patriarchal regime. family model.

Focusing specifically on policies aimed at separated/single parents, we can see that Britain’s political preoccupation with fathers has been strongly and consistently focused on financial provision, and ambivalent about their role as caregivers. Through a combination of child support rules and household means tests for benefits, the policy positions biological and social fathers as financial providers. Meanwhile, the inflexible conceptualization of family living conditions means that active parenting and caregiving in households cannot be factored into the benefit system. For example, regardless of the actual arrangements, Housing Benefit treats parents as one person if their children are registered as living with the other parent. The reduction in the rate of benefits for single people, which limits the financial accessibility of housing suitable for shared custody and overnight stays of children. Since most children whose parents live in different households typically reside with the mother, benefit rules that hinder rather than support shared custody not only classify fathers as breadwinners and mothers as caregivers, but also have class effects. Contact and caregiving is presented as a privilege not granted to low-income separated fathers who receive benefits.

I argue that despite a host of changes to work and family policies, including the introduction of shared parental leave and the right to early education, their gender the effects persisted. Requiring mothers on benefits to undertake paid work (at least part-time) might seem to indicate that the policy no longer assumes that ‘the worker’ is male and has no family responsibilities. Yet these policy changes mask the consistency of the gendered family ideal in all policies. Parents are not positioned as interchangeable in their roles of provider and caregiver, or even as each having a dual role, instead, policy stipulations that there is a primary caregiver reinforce the gender division of labor , as the father figure remains primarily a financial provider. Neither when living together nor in separate households are both (or all) parents considered equally important and required as caregivers.

Instead of committing to a more equitable gender order, through individual changes, UK social policy has generally maintained a consistent gender order over time. The implication is that specific policy recommendations to increase equality, such as the individual right to leave for fathers and partners, are insufficient if the commitment to privilege the nuclear family and gendered division of labor sanctioned by the State remains intact in other policies. These measures must be complemented by reforms in benefits, housing, employment and pension policies to support and encourage individuals’ care responsibilities within and between households, as well as their attainment of full citizenship. , regardless of their labor market status or relationship.

___________________

Note: the above is based on the article published by the author in the Social Policy Review.

About the Author

Jenny Chanfreau is a researcher in demography at the UCL Social Research Institute.

Photo by Kenneth Sørensen on Unsplash.

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Plaintiffs and Google agree to $118 million settlement in pay equity class action lawsuit https://cflweb.org/plaintiffs-and-google-agree-to-118-million-settlement-in-pay-equity-class-action-lawsuit/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 00:42:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/plaintiffs-and-google-agree-to-118-million-settlement-in-pay-equity-class-action-lawsuit/ SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The law firms of plaintiffs Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein LLP and Altshuler Berzon LLP announced today that the plaintiffs have reached an agreement with defendant Google LLC (“Google”), in which Google will pay $118 million dollars to settle a sex discrimination class action lawsuit. , Ellis v Google LLCNo. CGC-17-561299, pending since […]]]>

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–The law firms of plaintiffs Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein LLP and Altshuler Berzon LLP announced today that the plaintiffs have reached an agreement with defendant Google LLC (“Google”), in which Google will pay $118 million dollars to settle a sex discrimination class action lawsuit. , Ellis v Google LLCNo. CGC-17-561299, pending since 2017. The settlement affects approximately 15,500 female employees in 236 job titles (“Covered Positions”) in California since September 14, 2013.

In addition to the financial relief, the settlement provides for an independent third-party expert to analyze Google’s hiring leveling practices and an independent labor economist to review Google’s pay equity studies. Post-settlement work will be overseen by an external settlement controller over the next three years. The lawsuit challenged Google’s compensation and leveling processes, and the plaintiffs believe these programs will help ensure that women are not paid less than their male counterparts who perform substantially similar work, and that the challenged leveling practices of Google are fair.

Applicants: The named plaintiffs are Kelly Ellis, Holly Pease, Kelli Wisuri and Heidi Lamar. All of the complainants are women who had worked for Google in California in a covered position since September 14, 2013. Their backgrounds:

Complainant Kelly Ellis worked as a software engineer at Google’s office in Mountain View for about four years, leaving the company with the title of senior manager.

Plaintiff Holly Pease worked for Google for approximately 10.5 years, in Mountain View and Sunnyvale, holding numerous technical leadership positions including: Manager, Enterprise Network Engineering; Manager, Business Systems Integration; Manager, Enterprise Data Warehouse/Reporting Team; and Senior Manager, Business Systems Integration.

Plaintiff Kelli Wisuri worked for Google for approximately 2.5 years in its Mountain View office, serving as Corporate Operations Coordinator, Corporate Sales Operations Associate and Google Brand Evangelist, Communications Program Executive (aka Sales Solutions Senior Associate ).

Complainant Heidi Lamar worked as a preschool teacher and infant/toddler teacher at Google’s Children Center in Palo Alto for about four years.

Next steps: The court will set a hearing date for the preliminary approval of the settlement, which, if approved, will result in the Third Party Administrator sending notice to class members. If the court subsequently grants final approval of the settlement, the third-party administrator will allocate the settlement amounts based on an objective formula to each eligible class member. More information is available on the website: https://googlegendercase.com/

Settlement Statements:

“As a woman who has spent her entire career in the tech industry, I’m optimistic that the steps Google has agreed to take in this settlement will ensure more fairness for women,” the company said. complainant Holly Pease. “Google, since its inception, has led the tech industry. They also have the opportunity to lead the charge to ensure the inclusion and equity of women in tech.”

Plaintiffs’ co-lawyer Kelly Dermody said, “Plaintiffs believe this settlement advances gender equity at Google and will set an industry precedent.”

“Google has long been a technology leader. We are pleased that in this settlement agreement and order, Google will also affirm its commitment to be a leader in pay equity and equal employment opportunity. employment for all of its employees,” said plaintiffs’ co-lawyer Jim Finberg.

Claimant Counsel Information:

Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP: Lieff Cabraser is one of the largest and most successful law firms in the country, exclusively representing plaintiffs in civil litigation, having obtained verdicts or settlements worth more than $127 billion for clients in national scale. With 120 attorneys, the firm has conducted some of the most significant litigation of the past decade, including the VW clean diesel emissions case, which cost VW owners more than $15 billion (In re: Volkswagen ‘Clean Diesel’ Marketing, Sales Practices, and Products Readability Litigation, MDL No. 2672 (Federal Court for the Northern District of California); and the high-tech cold-call wage conspiracy case alleging an agreement between leading tech companies not to poach each other’s employees, which resulted in settlements totaling $435 million. dollars (In re: High Tech Employee Antitrust Litigation, 11-cv-2509-LJK (Federal Court for the Northern District of California). Partner Kelly Dermody, co-lead attorney here, led Advanced technology for his business. She is currently Chair of the Labor and Employment Law Section of the American Bar Association and Managing Partner of the San Francisco office of Lieff Cabraser.

Altshuler Berzon LLP: Altshuler Berzon LLP is a San Francisco law firm specializing in labor and employment law, constitutional, environmental, civil rights, election campaigning and impact litigation. Altshuler Berzon, LLP has served as co-lead counsel in a number of civil rights class action lawsuits, including Ries vs. McDonald’s, 1:20 CV 0002 HYJ RSK (WD Mich. 2022) (Sexual Harassment Class Action); and Satchell v Federal Express, C03-2878 SI (ND Cal.) (class action for racial discrimination). Altshuler Berzon is currently Co-Lead Counsel in the Jewett vs. Oracle Class action under the Equal Pay Act in San Mateo Superior Court, 17 Civ 02669 (San Mateo Sup.) Scheduled for trial on January 23, 2023.

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Female stars who had to fight for equal pay https://cflweb.org/female-stars-who-had-to-fight-for-equal-pay/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 13:21:03 +0000 https://cflweb.org/female-stars-who-had-to-fight-for-equal-pay/ “I felt that the offer presented to me did not match the value I brought to the franchise.” Negotiating a contract can be tricky, especially when it comes to careers in Hollywood. Sometimes things just don’t work out, leaving an actor to figure out if they want to fight for what they’re worth or just […]]]>

I felt that the offer presented to me did not match the value I brought to the franchise.”

Negotiating a contract can be tricky, especially when it comes to careers in Hollywood.

Sometimes things just don’t work out, leaving an actor to figure out if they want to fight for what they’re worth or just walk away from a project altogether.

Find out what happened when these actresses talked about what they deserved:

1.

neve campbell

Tasos Katopodis/WireImage/Getty Images

Neve Campell is an emblematic part of the Scream franchise, but she recently announced that she will not be appearing in Cry 6 because the offer made to her was not what she expected.

“As a woman, I’ve had to work extremely hard in my career to establish my worth, especially when it comes to Scream“, Neve said in a statement. “I felt that the offer presented to me did not match the value I brought to the franchise. It was a very difficult decision to move on. To all my Scream fans, i love you. You have always been incredibly supportive. I will be forever grateful to you and for what this franchise has given me over the past 25 years.”

2.

Charlize Theron

Jon Kopaloff/Getty Images

When Charlize Theron found out she was being paid less for her role in The hunter, despite sharing equal billing with co-star Chris Hemsworth, she knew she had to speak out. When it came time to negotiate contracts for the sequel, Charlize demanded more – and the studio agreed!

“I have to give them credit because once I asked they said yes,” Charlize told Elle UK. “They didn’t fight us to bring this to a place of fairness, and girls need to know that being a feminist is a good thing. It doesn’t mean you hate men. It means equal rights If you do the same job, you should be compensated and treated the same.”

3.

Jessica Chastain

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Jessica Chastain says she’s turned down projects when she’s not paid the same as her male counterparts. While she didn’t specify which movies she walked away from, she says it helped her “create a boundary” that educates others “about how to treat you.”

“There’s something huge that I recently turned down,” Jessica told Variety. “For me, it wasn’t about the money; it was an old-fashioned pay gap issue. I refused and they didn’t come back. I remember afterwards I was like, ‘What did I do? Maybe it was a mistake. But it wasn’t, because everyone in the studio system heard what I did. So what you’re doing is building a reputation: don’t bring Jessica something where she’s not fairly compensated compared to the male actor.

4.

Octavia Spencer

Emma Mcintyre/WireImage/Getty Images

Octavia Spencer has stood up for a higher paycheck on a film after being encouraged by Jessica Chastain. She explained that while the duo was talking about the pay gap, Octavia brought up the pay gaps faced by women of color. Jessica immediately helped Octavia into acting, and the women fought for equal pay on a project they were working on together.

“I love this woman, because she walks and she really talks,” Octavia said during a Sundance Film Festival panel. “She said, ‘Octavia, we’re going to make you pay for this movie… You and I are going to be bonding together. We’re going to be favored nations and we’re going to do the same thing. Fast forward to last week, we are earning five times what we asked for.”

5.

Siena Miller

Mike Marsland/Mike Marsland/WireImage/Getty Images

Sienna Miller says she had to turn down many roles throughout her career because she didn’t feel like she was being paid fairly. At one point, she was offered a role in a Broadway production where she and a male actor were the only ones on stage. When the team refused to pay her the same as her counterpart, she refused.

“It was a play with only two of us on stage and I was offered less than half of what it was going to be paid for,” Sienna told Vogue. “If it was two men, it probably wouldn’t happen. Sad, but I left.”

Later in her career, she asked for a higher salary before signing on for her role in 21 bridges. The movie studio turned her down, and she nearly walked away from the project — until her co-star, Chadwick Boseman, stepped in to donate part of her salary so she would be fairly paid.

6.

Patricia Arquette

Amy Sussman/Getty Images for Deadline Hollywood

Despite the fact that Patricia Arquette once gave a powerful Oscars acceptance speech where she called for equal pay for women, she says she continued to be presented with unfair offers from studios. In fact, she had to walk away from movies where she wasn’t compensated fairly. In one project, which she did not name, she says she was offered an entirely different compensation structure than her male partner, even though they were both Oscar winners.

“I quit a lot of jobs because they gave me really shitty deals that were really shitty and different from men in a really fucked up way, Patricia said. The daily beast.

seven.

Julie Depy

Axelle/FilmMagic/Getty

Julie Delpy had to fight for equal pay for her role in the Before trilogy. She Explain that in the first film, she earned a tenth of co-star Ethan Hawke’s salary. By the time of the second film, she was able to negotiate up to half Ethan’s salary. And before filming the final film in the trilogy, Julie threatened to walk away unless she was paid equally.

“I said, ‘Listen guys. If I don’t get paid, I don’t,’ Julie said Variety.

8.

Emmy Rossum

Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images

Midway through Emmy Rossum’s nine seasons Shameless, she fought to have her salary equal to that of the series’ male protagonist, William H. Macy. After lengthy contract negotiations, she received what she considered fair compensation, especially since she had spent seven seasons being paid less than William.

“I’ll tell you, the person who supported me the most was William H. Macy,” Emmy told The Hollywood Reporter. “Having the male counterpart on my show like, ‘Yeah, she deserves this and more,’ it was so empowering. And after it went public, it was a quick resolution.”

9.

Lauren Cohan

Desiree Navarro/WireImage/Getty Images

Lauren Cohan was part of the cast of The Walking Dead for nearly a decade, and while negotiating her contract for a ninth season, she realized it was time to move on. Amid the months-long contract renegotiation, AMC reportedly sent her “lowball” offers, and she says the whole process surprised her.

“I felt kind of surprised, to be honest with you,” Lauren told EW. “And I took that, how baffled I was, and I thought, ‘Okay, well, that’s a sign. It may no longer be an adjustment. To feel like we weren’t aligned in many ways, I just thought, “Okay, well, maybe that means something.”

Although she initially left, Lauren has since returned to the show.

ten.

Hilary Duf

Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Back when Hilary Duff was a teenager, her team was in negotiations for a sequel to The Lizzie McGuire movie. Hilary’s mother, Susan, helped with the finances, explaining that Hilary deserved the $500,000 bonus that Disney promised her immediately. Disney disagreed and withdrew their offer for the film completely and Hilary walked away from any future Lizzy projects with the company.

“Disney thought they might bully us into taking the offer they wanted to make, and they couldn’t,” Susan told EW. “We walked away from a sequel. They walked away from a franchise…We weren’t feeling the love. They weren’t giving Hilary the respect she deserved.”

11.

Julianna Margulies

Jon Kopaloff/Getty Images

The good wife star, Julianna Margulies, has been asked to reprise her role in the show’s spin-off series, The Good Fight, but she ended up walking away when she was not going to be fairly compensated. Julianna says the “deal didn’t happen” because “CBS wouldn’t pay her.”

“The showrunners had found a good way to reintroduce my character, a story that was supposed to span three episodes,” Julianna reportedly said. “I was really excited about the idea, but CBS refused to pay my (demand).”

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Canada-Panama game canceled in labor and equal pay dispute https://cflweb.org/canada-panama-game-canceled-in-labor-and-equal-pay-dispute/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 21:16:11 +0000 https://cflweb.org/canada-panama-game-canceled-in-labor-and-equal-pay-dispute/ VANCOUVER, BC – Canada’s warm-up game against Panama has been canceled On Sunday, when the men’s team refused to play due to a labor dispute with the country’s governing body which includes a request for the women’s national team to be granted equal match fees. The players, who are preparing for the country’s first appearance […]]]>

VANCOUVER, BCCanada’s warm-up game against Panama has been canceled On Sunday, when the men’s team refused to play due to a labor dispute with the country’s governing body which includes a request for the women’s national team to be granted equal match fees.

The players, who are preparing for the country’s first appearance at the men’s World Cup since 1986, refused training on Friday and Saturday.

The players said they wanted 40 per cent of World Cup prize money, a travel package for friends and family and “a fair structure with our women‘s national team which shares the same match costs for players, the percentage of prize money won at our respective FIFA World Cups and the development of a national women’s league.

“We want to work with our organization, but the relationship has been strained for years,” the players said in a statement. “And now Canada Soccer has disrespected our team and compromised our efforts to raise the standards and effectively advance the game in Canada. »

A d

Unions for the United States men’s and women’s national teams announced agreements on May 18 calling for equal pay, including a pooling of World Cup prize money. The Canadian men said they wanted an equal percentage of prize money and equal match fees.

“In March, we entered into contract discussions with Canada Soccer,” the men’s national team said in a statement. “Due to leaders delaying the process and taking vacations, the negotiation process was unnecessarily prolonged. an archaic offer and the general secretary and president of the association only made themselves available for the first time to enter into contact with the players only on June 4 at 4 p.m. For these reasons, we have reluctantly decided not to play our match today against Panama.”

Richard Scott, a spokesman for the Canadian Soccer Association, did not respond to an email seeking comment. The governing body said in a statement on Saturday evening: “Canada Soccer is currently in discussions with its national team players regarding fair and equitable player compensation ahead of the FIFA World Cup period.”

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FIFA did not respond to a request for comment.

Canada’s women’s team is ranked sixth in the world and won gold at the Olympics last year.

“I think what we’re asking of the players is fair,” midfielder Jonthan Osorio, a regular out of the current roster due to injury, told The Canadian Press. “We don’t want to be treated more specially than similar teams we compare ourselves to. We just want to be respected and not exploited and just get our fair share.

Osorio, 29, said flights and accommodation have improved since former women’s coach John Herdman became men’s coach in January 2018.

“It’s very different from what it was before,” Osorio said. “That said, there is a lot to do on the part of the federation. I think the players need to see more support from the federation now and not just rely on John to get things done. I think these things will come with results.

Panama was a late replacement as Sunday’s opponent, which was originally Iran. Canada’s governing body has abandoned Iran following criticism from Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

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Canada are scheduled to face Curacao in Vancouver on Thursday and Honduras on June 13, both in the CONCACAF Nations League. Number 38 Canada open World Cup Group F in Qatar against second-ranked Belgium on November 23, face number 16 Croatia four days later and number 24 Morocco on December 1 .

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Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Better East Texas: Equal Pay in Sports https://cflweb.org/better-east-texas-equal-pay-in-sports/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 21:51:00 +0000 https://cflweb.org/better-east-texas-equal-pay-in-sports/ TYLER, Texas (KLTV) — Star athletes have always had the opportunity to make big bucks professionally. For some parents, it’s an early dream for their children to play a chosen sport as a pro, and for other families, sports are a way to financially provide gifted players. But recent years have revealed a pay disparity […]]]>

TYLER, Texas (KLTV) — Star athletes have always had the opportunity to make big bucks professionally. For some parents, it’s an early dream for their children to play a chosen sport as a pro, and for other families, sports are a way to financially provide gifted players. But recent years have revealed a pay disparity between professional female athletes and their male counterparts. Men are generally paid more for the same sport. It took a class action lawsuit filed against the United States Women‘s National Soccer Team against the organization governing American football. And they finally came to a settlement that provides equal pay to get ahead in the sport. The women’s team used the point of their success – their performance – being better than the men’s team and the resulting pay for both – as one of the reasons for the lawsuit. And, it’s true, the women’s team won more on the big stages. But is this really the point that should have been at the heart of the argument? What happens when the men’s team has a better record? The point of their argument should have simply been, let’s do what is right and fair. This then applies to all professional sports that have men’s and women’s leagues – hockey, basketball, and many others. Now, of course, it remains to be seen if other sports will adopt this same equality. Men’s basketball, the NBA, has been so active on social justice that there will surely be pressure to share wealth between genders. But we will see. And it will make a Better East Texas.

Copyright 2022 KLTV. All rights reserved.

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The uphill battle for equal work in Europe 2022 – POLITICO https://cflweb.org/the-uphill-battle-for-equal-work-in-europe-2022-politico/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 03:03:07 +0000 https://cflweb.org/the-uphill-battle-for-equal-work-in-europe-2022-politico/ Equality has a business case. Employers who treat their staff equally attract and retain a talented and skilled workforce, and drive productivity and innovation. Inequality is bad for economic growth, says the OECD, and they should know it. Yet creating equal working conditions and treatment for workers is an uphill battle, even in Europe in […]]]>

Equality has a business case. Employers who treat their staff equally attract and retain a talented and skilled workforce, and drive productivity and innovation. Inequality is bad for economic growth, says the OECD, and they should know it. Yet creating equal working conditions and treatment for workers is an uphill battle, even in Europe in 2022. After two decades of declining real wages, the economic wrecking ball of the COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact devastating on poverty levels. Europe’s tough sanctions against Russia’s barbaric aggression against Ukraine are right, and we are ready to pay that price for peace while ensuring solidarity mechanisms so that the most vulnerable do not bear the brunt heavy burden. At the same time, new technologies and artificial intelligence are increasing the size of the precarious work sector, creating the dangerous prospect of a two-speed labor market.

After two decades of declining real wages, the economic wrecking ball of the COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on poverty levels.

Can we stop the digital revolution from devouring hard-won workers’ rights? The answer to this question will largely determine the future of work. It’s so convenient: with one click on our smartphones, we can have food delivered to our homes or transported. But the apps carefully hide the true story of platform workers, who are too often denied fair wages and social insurance, denied employee participation and voice, and denied paid time off and working conditions. decent work. We fight for platform workers to be considered employees, with all applicable rights – unless platform companies can prove they are dealing with genuine freelancers. Through this “rebuttable presumption” of an employment relationship, we can ensure that platform workers get the rights they should be entitled to, such as minimum wage, social insurance, health and security and sick leave, as well as the right to organize and bargain collectively.

The apps carefully hide the true story of platform workers, who are too often denied fair wages and social insurance.

As algorithms become an integral part of working life, we risk creating a two-tier labor market, where workers managed by their employers through algorithms have fewer rights than workers in the traditional economy. This is true for platform workers, as well as any other worker managed by digital tools. Every tool affecting working conditions and worker health and safety must be transparent and subject to collective bargaining, including algorithms. Decisions affecting working conditions should not be made by automated systems without human supervision or in violation of our data protection laws. Workers should never be at the mercy of algorithms. How we protect some of the most vulnerable people in today’s economy will shape tomorrow’s societies.

In the EU, women earn on average 14.1% less than men in comparable jobs.

To fight another fight worth fighting: equal pay for equal work or work of equal value. Yet women in the EU earn on average 14.1% less than men in comparable jobs, according to Commission figures. Currently, we are negotiating with EU governments for a new law on corporate pay transparency. Closing the gender pay gap cannot be left to women workers suing companies, but must be the obligation of companies and governments. With the new rules, workers will have the right to receive wage information. Companies will have to remedy unjustified imbalances. If companies do not comply, they must face penalties and compensate those affected.

Inequality between European workers remains a divisive issue. With the revised rules for posted workers, we have ensured that workers receive the same rights and the same pay for the same work at the same workplace. By putting an end to the mistreatment of posted workers, who often had to endure deplorable living conditions and received nothing but misery, we also put an end to social dumping. Now co-workers can become co-workers again rather than competitors. Yet we are still waiting for governments to finally take social security coordination seriously. With a single market and labor mobility comes the duty to ensure that the 14 million citizens living or working in another EU country are sufficiently covered and protected by social security systems, including unemployment benefits, long-term benefits and family benefits.

The Adequate Minimum Wage Directive will finally put an end to the in-work poverty scandal.

We also say it loud and clear: hard work must pay off. According to Eurostat, one in ten Europeans does not earn enough to make ends meet. Even if they work a hard week of 40 hours or more, they cannot afford their rent, food and energy bills. With prices soaring, many Europeans cannot take a decent standard of living for granted. We are talking about the very people who keep our societies afloat: supermarket cashiers and stackers, cooks and waiters, truck drivers and carers, farm workers and kindergarten teachers. They don’t get the respect or pay they deserve.
The Adequate Minimum Wage Directive will finally put an end to the in-work poverty scandal. In one fell swoop, we are strengthening collective bargaining as the best way to ensure decent working conditions across Europe. Europe’s misguided recipe of lowering wages and breaking sectoral collective agreements is hurting people. It is time for change and we are leading the charge to make it happen: wages must rise and the bargaining power of workers must increase.

Minimum wages should function as a threshold of decency. Setting them at an adequate level only works when taking into account the cost of living. Fair minimum wages will also help reduce the gender pay gap and tackle inequality. According to the OECD, the main mechanism through which inequality disrupts growth is by undermining the educational opportunities of children from the poorest families, reducing their social mobility, making them less productive and causing them to earn lower wages. . We need to break the vicious cycle of poverty that breeds poverty — by ensuring that all Europeans have decent wages so that they can have housing, healthy food and a good education for their children. Furthermore, we also need sufficient standards for the minimum income in the EU. Equality at work will make many children happier and our societies better off in every way.

This is the fight of our time: progress cannot go hand in hand with rising inequalities. European citizens have been calling for change for years. We progressives hear their roar.

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